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Rapid, controllable growth of silver nanostructured surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for red blood cell detection.

Zhang S, Tian X, Yin J, Liu Y, Dong Z, Sun JL, Ma W - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: A greater proportion of the haemoglobin in the RBCs of older donors was in the deoxygenated state than that of the younger donors.This implies that haemoglobin of older people has lower oxygen-carrying capacity than that of younger people.Overall, the fabricated silver substrates show promise in biomedical SERS spectral detection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Science, Huazhong Agricultural University, 430070, Wuhan, China.

ABSTRACT
Silver nanostructured films suitable for use as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates are prepared in just 2 hours by the solid-state ionics method. By changing the intensity of the external direct current, we can readily control the surface morphology and growth rate of the silver nanostructured films. A detailed investigation of the surface enhancement of the silver nanostructured films using Rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a molecular probe revealed that the enhancement factor of the films was up to 10(11). We used the silver nanostructured films as substrates in SERS detection of human red blood cells (RBCs). The SERS spectra of RBCs on the silver nanostructured film could be clearly detected at a laser power of just 0.05 mW. Comparison of the SERS spectra of RBCs obtained from younger and older donors showed that the SERS spectra depended on donor age. A greater proportion of the haemoglobin in the RBCs of older donors was in the deoxygenated state than that of the younger donors. This implies that haemoglobin of older people has lower oxygen-carrying capacity than that of younger people. Overall, the fabricated silver substrates show promise in biomedical SERS spectral detection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Growth of silver nanostructures by the solid-state ionics method.(a) A clean glass slide placed in a deposition chamber at room temperature under vacuum (10−4 Pa). (b) Two parallel silver films separated by a distance of 6 cm deposited by vacuum thermal evaporation on the two ends of the glass slide for use as electrodes. (c) RbAg4I5 film (400-nm-thick) deposited over the Ag electrodes and glass slide by vacuum thermal evaporation. (d) An external direct current applied to the slide. (e) Silver nanostructures grow at the edge of the cathode and burst out of the RbAg4I5 film. (f) The silver nanostructures grow continuously under the applied current. The growth front, where Ag+ is reduced to Ag atom, serves as the new edge of the cathode. The silver nanostructure grows toward the anode and the silver anode is consumed.
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f7: Growth of silver nanostructures by the solid-state ionics method.(a) A clean glass slide placed in a deposition chamber at room temperature under vacuum (10−4 Pa). (b) Two parallel silver films separated by a distance of 6 cm deposited by vacuum thermal evaporation on the two ends of the glass slide for use as electrodes. (c) RbAg4I5 film (400-nm-thick) deposited over the Ag electrodes and glass slide by vacuum thermal evaporation. (d) An external direct current applied to the slide. (e) Silver nanostructures grow at the edge of the cathode and burst out of the RbAg4I5 film. (f) The silver nanostructures grow continuously under the applied current. The growth front, where Ag+ is reduced to Ag atom, serves as the new edge of the cathode. The silver nanostructure grows toward the anode and the silver anode is consumed.

Mentions: A superionic conducting RbAg4I5 film has the same order of ionic conductivity as a strong electrolyte solution or fused salt, so it acts as an ion channel between silver electrodes. With the external direct current provided by a source meter (Keithley 2400, USA), Ag atoms of the anode are ionized to form Ag+ and move to the cathode through the ion channel, thus forming a directional ion current. The Ag+ is reduced to Ag atom at the cathode. As a result, Ag atoms pile up at the edge of the cathode and grow into silver nanostructures. This process is described in detail in Fig. 7.


Rapid, controllable growth of silver nanostructured surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for red blood cell detection.

Zhang S, Tian X, Yin J, Liu Y, Dong Z, Sun JL, Ma W - Sci Rep (2016)

Growth of silver nanostructures by the solid-state ionics method.(a) A clean glass slide placed in a deposition chamber at room temperature under vacuum (10−4 Pa). (b) Two parallel silver films separated by a distance of 6 cm deposited by vacuum thermal evaporation on the two ends of the glass slide for use as electrodes. (c) RbAg4I5 film (400-nm-thick) deposited over the Ag electrodes and glass slide by vacuum thermal evaporation. (d) An external direct current applied to the slide. (e) Silver nanostructures grow at the edge of the cathode and burst out of the RbAg4I5 film. (f) The silver nanostructures grow continuously under the applied current. The growth front, where Ag+ is reduced to Ag atom, serves as the new edge of the cathode. The silver nanostructure grows toward the anode and the silver anode is consumed.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837339&req=5

f7: Growth of silver nanostructures by the solid-state ionics method.(a) A clean glass slide placed in a deposition chamber at room temperature under vacuum (10−4 Pa). (b) Two parallel silver films separated by a distance of 6 cm deposited by vacuum thermal evaporation on the two ends of the glass slide for use as electrodes. (c) RbAg4I5 film (400-nm-thick) deposited over the Ag electrodes and glass slide by vacuum thermal evaporation. (d) An external direct current applied to the slide. (e) Silver nanostructures grow at the edge of the cathode and burst out of the RbAg4I5 film. (f) The silver nanostructures grow continuously under the applied current. The growth front, where Ag+ is reduced to Ag atom, serves as the new edge of the cathode. The silver nanostructure grows toward the anode and the silver anode is consumed.
Mentions: A superionic conducting RbAg4I5 film has the same order of ionic conductivity as a strong electrolyte solution or fused salt, so it acts as an ion channel between silver electrodes. With the external direct current provided by a source meter (Keithley 2400, USA), Ag atoms of the anode are ionized to form Ag+ and move to the cathode through the ion channel, thus forming a directional ion current. The Ag+ is reduced to Ag atom at the cathode. As a result, Ag atoms pile up at the edge of the cathode and grow into silver nanostructures. This process is described in detail in Fig. 7.

Bottom Line: A greater proportion of the haemoglobin in the RBCs of older donors was in the deoxygenated state than that of the younger donors.This implies that haemoglobin of older people has lower oxygen-carrying capacity than that of younger people.Overall, the fabricated silver substrates show promise in biomedical SERS spectral detection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Science, Huazhong Agricultural University, 430070, Wuhan, China.

ABSTRACT
Silver nanostructured films suitable for use as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates are prepared in just 2 hours by the solid-state ionics method. By changing the intensity of the external direct current, we can readily control the surface morphology and growth rate of the silver nanostructured films. A detailed investigation of the surface enhancement of the silver nanostructured films using Rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a molecular probe revealed that the enhancement factor of the films was up to 10(11). We used the silver nanostructured films as substrates in SERS detection of human red blood cells (RBCs). The SERS spectra of RBCs on the silver nanostructured film could be clearly detected at a laser power of just 0.05 mW. Comparison of the SERS spectra of RBCs obtained from younger and older donors showed that the SERS spectra depended on donor age. A greater proportion of the haemoglobin in the RBCs of older donors was in the deoxygenated state than that of the younger donors. This implies that haemoglobin of older people has lower oxygen-carrying capacity than that of younger people. Overall, the fabricated silver substrates show promise in biomedical SERS spectral detection.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus