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Rapid, controllable growth of silver nanostructured surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for red blood cell detection.

Zhang S, Tian X, Yin J, Liu Y, Dong Z, Sun JL, Ma W - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: A greater proportion of the haemoglobin in the RBCs of older donors was in the deoxygenated state than that of the younger donors.This implies that haemoglobin of older people has lower oxygen-carrying capacity than that of younger people.Overall, the fabricated silver substrates show promise in biomedical SERS spectral detection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Science, Huazhong Agricultural University, 430070, Wuhan, China.

ABSTRACT
Silver nanostructured films suitable for use as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates are prepared in just 2 hours by the solid-state ionics method. By changing the intensity of the external direct current, we can readily control the surface morphology and growth rate of the silver nanostructured films. A detailed investigation of the surface enhancement of the silver nanostructured films using Rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a molecular probe revealed that the enhancement factor of the films was up to 10(11). We used the silver nanostructured films as substrates in SERS detection of human red blood cells (RBCs). The SERS spectra of RBCs on the silver nanostructured film could be clearly detected at a laser power of just 0.05 mW. Comparison of the SERS spectra of RBCs obtained from younger and older donors showed that the SERS spectra depended on donor age. A greater proportion of the haemoglobin in the RBCs of older donors was in the deoxygenated state than that of the younger donors. This implies that haemoglobin of older people has lower oxygen-carrying capacity than that of younger people. Overall, the fabricated silver substrates show promise in biomedical SERS spectral detection.

No MeSH data available.


SEM images of the front surface morphology of the silver nanostructures grown with different external direct currents.The scale bar is 1 μm in all images.
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f2: SEM images of the front surface morphology of the silver nanostructures grown with different external direct currents.The scale bar is 1 μm in all images.

Mentions: Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of silver nanostructures grown with different external direct currents are presented in Fig. 2. The surface morphology of the silver nanostructures depends on the external direct current. This is because the surface morphology is influenced by the accumulation rate of Ag atoms at the cathode. When the external direct current is low, the current density of Ag+ in the RbAg4I5 film used as an ionic conductor is small and the accumulation rate of Ag atoms at the cathode edge is slow. As a result, the Ag atoms accumulate in an orderly manner to form thin, ordered nanowires. At higher external direct current, the accumulation rate of Ag atoms at the cathode edge is faster, which leads to thicker Ag nanowires. Redundant Ag atoms continue to accumulate on the Ag nanowires to form convex particles. When the external direct current exceeds 30 μA, the accumulation rate of Ag atoms at the cathode edge increases further. Nanowires cannot adapt to such a high accumulation rate, so closely stacked nanobud structures are produced. The density of the nanobuds increases with external direct current up to 70 μA. When the external direct current exceeds 70 μA, the nanobuds fuse to form thicker structures coated with numerous convex particles.


Rapid, controllable growth of silver nanostructured surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates for red blood cell detection.

Zhang S, Tian X, Yin J, Liu Y, Dong Z, Sun JL, Ma W - Sci Rep (2016)

SEM images of the front surface morphology of the silver nanostructures grown with different external direct currents.The scale bar is 1 μm in all images.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837339&req=5

f2: SEM images of the front surface morphology of the silver nanostructures grown with different external direct currents.The scale bar is 1 μm in all images.
Mentions: Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of silver nanostructures grown with different external direct currents are presented in Fig. 2. The surface morphology of the silver nanostructures depends on the external direct current. This is because the surface morphology is influenced by the accumulation rate of Ag atoms at the cathode. When the external direct current is low, the current density of Ag+ in the RbAg4I5 film used as an ionic conductor is small and the accumulation rate of Ag atoms at the cathode edge is slow. As a result, the Ag atoms accumulate in an orderly manner to form thin, ordered nanowires. At higher external direct current, the accumulation rate of Ag atoms at the cathode edge is faster, which leads to thicker Ag nanowires. Redundant Ag atoms continue to accumulate on the Ag nanowires to form convex particles. When the external direct current exceeds 30 μA, the accumulation rate of Ag atoms at the cathode edge increases further. Nanowires cannot adapt to such a high accumulation rate, so closely stacked nanobud structures are produced. The density of the nanobuds increases with external direct current up to 70 μA. When the external direct current exceeds 70 μA, the nanobuds fuse to form thicker structures coated with numerous convex particles.

Bottom Line: A greater proportion of the haemoglobin in the RBCs of older donors was in the deoxygenated state than that of the younger donors.This implies that haemoglobin of older people has lower oxygen-carrying capacity than that of younger people.Overall, the fabricated silver substrates show promise in biomedical SERS spectral detection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Science, Huazhong Agricultural University, 430070, Wuhan, China.

ABSTRACT
Silver nanostructured films suitable for use as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates are prepared in just 2 hours by the solid-state ionics method. By changing the intensity of the external direct current, we can readily control the surface morphology and growth rate of the silver nanostructured films. A detailed investigation of the surface enhancement of the silver nanostructured films using Rhodamine 6G (R6G) as a molecular probe revealed that the enhancement factor of the films was up to 10(11). We used the silver nanostructured films as substrates in SERS detection of human red blood cells (RBCs). The SERS spectra of RBCs on the silver nanostructured film could be clearly detected at a laser power of just 0.05 mW. Comparison of the SERS spectra of RBCs obtained from younger and older donors showed that the SERS spectra depended on donor age. A greater proportion of the haemoglobin in the RBCs of older donors was in the deoxygenated state than that of the younger donors. This implies that haemoglobin of older people has lower oxygen-carrying capacity than that of younger people. Overall, the fabricated silver substrates show promise in biomedical SERS spectral detection.

No MeSH data available.