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A Moderate Dose of Alcohol Does Not Influence Experience of Social Ostracism in Hazardous Drinkers.

Buckingham J, Moss A, Gyure K, Ralph N, Hindocha C, Lawn W, Curran HV, Freeman TP - Front Psychol (2016)

Bottom Line: Alcohol administration did not influence the effects of simulated social ostracism, which was supported by a Bayesian analysis.In conclusion, a moderate dose of alcohol did not influence experience of simulated social ostracism in hazardous drinkers.Further research is needed to establish the effects of alcohol administration on social ostracism using different doses and populations of alcohol users.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological and Experimental Psychology, Queen Mary University of LondonLondon, UK; Clinical Psychopharmacology Unit, University College LondonLondon, UK.

ABSTRACT
Anecdotal and correlational evidence suggests a relationship between social ostracism and alcohol dependence. Furthermore, a recent fMRI investigation found differences in the neural correlates associated with ostracism in people with alcohol dependence compared to healthy controls. We predicted that acutely administered alcohol would reduce the negative effects of social ostracism. Alcohol (0.4 g/kg) or matched placebo was administered to a sample of 32 hazardous drinkers over two sessions in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. In each session, participants were exposed to an ostracism event via the computerized ball passing game, "Cyberball." In order to quantify the effects of ostracism, the fundamental needs questionnaire was completed twice on each testing session; immediately after (i) social inclusion and (ii) social exclusion. Ostracism caused robust changes to scores on the fundamental needs questionnaire, in line with previous literature. Alcohol administration did not influence the effects of simulated social ostracism, which was supported by a Bayesian analysis. Exploratory analyses revealed a negative relationship between age and ostracism induced fundamental needs threat across both sessions. In conclusion, a moderate dose of alcohol did not influence experience of simulated social ostracism in hazardous drinkers. Further research is needed to establish the effects of alcohol administration on social ostracism using different doses and populations of alcohol users.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effects of simulated social ostracism on fundamental need scores were negatively correlated with age, accounting for 24% of the variance.
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Figure 3: Effects of simulated social ostracism on fundamental need scores were negatively correlated with age, accounting for 24% of the variance.

Mentions: Given the absence of an alcohol by ostracism interaction, fundamental need changes scores (inclusion – exclusion) were collapsed from both placebo and alcohol sessions. These scores were investigated for possible correlations with AUDIT scores and weekly alcohol consumption. No relationship was found between fundamental need change scores and AUDIT scores (r = 0.150 and p = 0.414), or units of alcohol consumed per week (r = 0.236 and p = 0.193).


A Moderate Dose of Alcohol Does Not Influence Experience of Social Ostracism in Hazardous Drinkers.

Buckingham J, Moss A, Gyure K, Ralph N, Hindocha C, Lawn W, Curran HV, Freeman TP - Front Psychol (2016)

Effects of simulated social ostracism on fundamental need scores were negatively correlated with age, accounting for 24% of the variance.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4837322&req=5

Figure 3: Effects of simulated social ostracism on fundamental need scores were negatively correlated with age, accounting for 24% of the variance.
Mentions: Given the absence of an alcohol by ostracism interaction, fundamental need changes scores (inclusion – exclusion) were collapsed from both placebo and alcohol sessions. These scores were investigated for possible correlations with AUDIT scores and weekly alcohol consumption. No relationship was found between fundamental need change scores and AUDIT scores (r = 0.150 and p = 0.414), or units of alcohol consumed per week (r = 0.236 and p = 0.193).

Bottom Line: Alcohol administration did not influence the effects of simulated social ostracism, which was supported by a Bayesian analysis.In conclusion, a moderate dose of alcohol did not influence experience of simulated social ostracism in hazardous drinkers.Further research is needed to establish the effects of alcohol administration on social ostracism using different doses and populations of alcohol users.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biological and Experimental Psychology, Queen Mary University of LondonLondon, UK; Clinical Psychopharmacology Unit, University College LondonLondon, UK.

ABSTRACT
Anecdotal and correlational evidence suggests a relationship between social ostracism and alcohol dependence. Furthermore, a recent fMRI investigation found differences in the neural correlates associated with ostracism in people with alcohol dependence compared to healthy controls. We predicted that acutely administered alcohol would reduce the negative effects of social ostracism. Alcohol (0.4 g/kg) or matched placebo was administered to a sample of 32 hazardous drinkers over two sessions in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. In each session, participants were exposed to an ostracism event via the computerized ball passing game, "Cyberball." In order to quantify the effects of ostracism, the fundamental needs questionnaire was completed twice on each testing session; immediately after (i) social inclusion and (ii) social exclusion. Ostracism caused robust changes to scores on the fundamental needs questionnaire, in line with previous literature. Alcohol administration did not influence the effects of simulated social ostracism, which was supported by a Bayesian analysis. Exploratory analyses revealed a negative relationship between age and ostracism induced fundamental needs threat across both sessions. In conclusion, a moderate dose of alcohol did not influence experience of simulated social ostracism in hazardous drinkers. Further research is needed to establish the effects of alcohol administration on social ostracism using different doses and populations of alcohol users.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus