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Triangular Titanium Implants for Minimally Invasive Sacroiliac Joint Fusion: A Prospective Study.

Duhon BS, Cher DJ, Wine KD, Kovalsky DA, Lockstadt H, SIFI Study Gro - Global Spine J (2015)

Bottom Line: Mean ODI improved from 55.2 at baseline to 32.5 and 31.4 at 6 and 12 months (improvements of 22.7 and 23.9 points, p < 0.0001 each).SF-36 physical component summary improved from 31.7 at baseline to 40.2 and 40.3 at 6 and 12 months (p < 0.0001).At 6 and 12 months, 93 and 87% of subjects, respectively, were somewhat or very satisfied and 92 and 91%, respectively, would have the procedure again.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neurosurgical and Spine Specialists, Parker, Colorado, United States.

ABSTRACT
Study Design Prospective multicenter single-arm interventional clinical trial. Objective To determine the degree of improvement in sacroiliac (SI) joint pain, disability related to SI joint pain, and quality of life in patients with SI joint dysfunction who undergo minimally invasive SI joint fusion using triangular-shaped titanium implants. Methods Subjects (n = 172) underwent minimally invasive SI joint fusion between August 2012 and January 2014 and completed structured assessments preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively, including a 100-mm SI joint and back pain visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form-36 (SF-36), and EuroQOL-5D. Patient satisfaction with surgery was assessed at 6 and 12 months. Results Mean SI joint pain improved from 79.8 at baseline to 30.0 and 30.4 at 6 and 12 months, respectively (mean improvements of 49.9 and 49.1 points, p < 0.0001 each). Mean ODI improved from 55.2 at baseline to 32.5 and 31.4 at 6 and 12 months (improvements of 22.7 and 23.9 points, p < 0.0001 each). SF-36 physical component summary improved from 31.7 at baseline to 40.2 and 40.3 at 6 and 12 months (p < 0.0001). At 6 and 12 months, 93 and 87% of subjects, respectively, were somewhat or very satisfied and 92 and 91%, respectively, would have the procedure again. Conclusions Minimally invasive SI joint fusion resulted in improvement of pain, disability, and quality of life in patients with SI joint dysfunction due to degenerative sacroiliitis and SI joint disruption.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Pain location in subjects reporting primarily left-sided sacroiliac joint pain. Dot size is proportional to the number of subjects reporting pain in that location.
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FI1500059-2: Pain location in subjects reporting primarily left-sided sacroiliac joint pain. Dot size is proportional to the number of subjects reporting pain in that location.

Mentions: Patient characteristics are listed in Table 1. Mean subject age was 50.9 years; most (96.5%) subjects were Caucasian and 69.8% were women. At baseline subjects experienced high levels of SI joint pain and had substantial disability, as indicated by high baseline pain ratings (mean 79.8 on the 0-to-100 scale) and ODI scores (mean 55.2). Mean pain duration prior to enrollment was 5.1 years (range 0.43 to 41); 84.3% had pain for >1 year and 64.5% had pain for >2 years. Twenty subjects reported that their pain began in the peripartum period (11.6%). Quality of life was substantially diminished, as indicated by low EQ-5D scores (mean of 0.43 on time trade-off and 57.1 on health thermometer) and low SF-36 scores (mean PCS of 31.7 and MCS of 38.5). These quality-of-life scores represent a significant burden of disease.9 Seventy-six percent were taking opioid medications at baseline, and all reported that multiple activities commonly caused their SI joint pain. Many subjects (44.2%) had a history of prior lumbar fusion, and concomitant spine disease was common. (Note that patients with severe pain from causes other than SI joint dysfunction were excluded from the study.) Pain associated with the SI joint was typically located at the posterior superior iliac spine, but distant and/or radiating pain was frequent anteriorly and posteriorly (Fig. 2). SI joint pain persisted despite prior treatment with physical therapy (64.5% of the subjects), SI joint steroid injections (94.2%), and/or RF ablation of the SI joint (15.7%).


Triangular Titanium Implants for Minimally Invasive Sacroiliac Joint Fusion: A Prospective Study.

Duhon BS, Cher DJ, Wine KD, Kovalsky DA, Lockstadt H, SIFI Study Gro - Global Spine J (2015)

Pain location in subjects reporting primarily left-sided sacroiliac joint pain. Dot size is proportional to the number of subjects reporting pain in that location.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836932&req=5

FI1500059-2: Pain location in subjects reporting primarily left-sided sacroiliac joint pain. Dot size is proportional to the number of subjects reporting pain in that location.
Mentions: Patient characteristics are listed in Table 1. Mean subject age was 50.9 years; most (96.5%) subjects were Caucasian and 69.8% were women. At baseline subjects experienced high levels of SI joint pain and had substantial disability, as indicated by high baseline pain ratings (mean 79.8 on the 0-to-100 scale) and ODI scores (mean 55.2). Mean pain duration prior to enrollment was 5.1 years (range 0.43 to 41); 84.3% had pain for >1 year and 64.5% had pain for >2 years. Twenty subjects reported that their pain began in the peripartum period (11.6%). Quality of life was substantially diminished, as indicated by low EQ-5D scores (mean of 0.43 on time trade-off and 57.1 on health thermometer) and low SF-36 scores (mean PCS of 31.7 and MCS of 38.5). These quality-of-life scores represent a significant burden of disease.9 Seventy-six percent were taking opioid medications at baseline, and all reported that multiple activities commonly caused their SI joint pain. Many subjects (44.2%) had a history of prior lumbar fusion, and concomitant spine disease was common. (Note that patients with severe pain from causes other than SI joint dysfunction were excluded from the study.) Pain associated with the SI joint was typically located at the posterior superior iliac spine, but distant and/or radiating pain was frequent anteriorly and posteriorly (Fig. 2). SI joint pain persisted despite prior treatment with physical therapy (64.5% of the subjects), SI joint steroid injections (94.2%), and/or RF ablation of the SI joint (15.7%).

Bottom Line: Mean ODI improved from 55.2 at baseline to 32.5 and 31.4 at 6 and 12 months (improvements of 22.7 and 23.9 points, p < 0.0001 each).SF-36 physical component summary improved from 31.7 at baseline to 40.2 and 40.3 at 6 and 12 months (p < 0.0001).At 6 and 12 months, 93 and 87% of subjects, respectively, were somewhat or very satisfied and 92 and 91%, respectively, would have the procedure again.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Neurosurgical and Spine Specialists, Parker, Colorado, United States.

ABSTRACT
Study Design Prospective multicenter single-arm interventional clinical trial. Objective To determine the degree of improvement in sacroiliac (SI) joint pain, disability related to SI joint pain, and quality of life in patients with SI joint dysfunction who undergo minimally invasive SI joint fusion using triangular-shaped titanium implants. Methods Subjects (n = 172) underwent minimally invasive SI joint fusion between August 2012 and January 2014 and completed structured assessments preoperatively and at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively, including a 100-mm SI joint and back pain visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Short Form-36 (SF-36), and EuroQOL-5D. Patient satisfaction with surgery was assessed at 6 and 12 months. Results Mean SI joint pain improved from 79.8 at baseline to 30.0 and 30.4 at 6 and 12 months, respectively (mean improvements of 49.9 and 49.1 points, p < 0.0001 each). Mean ODI improved from 55.2 at baseline to 32.5 and 31.4 at 6 and 12 months (improvements of 22.7 and 23.9 points, p < 0.0001 each). SF-36 physical component summary improved from 31.7 at baseline to 40.2 and 40.3 at 6 and 12 months (p < 0.0001). At 6 and 12 months, 93 and 87% of subjects, respectively, were somewhat or very satisfied and 92 and 91%, respectively, would have the procedure again. Conclusions Minimally invasive SI joint fusion resulted in improvement of pain, disability, and quality of life in patients with SI joint dysfunction due to degenerative sacroiliitis and SI joint disruption.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus