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Pulmonary Complications following Thoracic Spinal Surgery: A Systematic Review.

Gabel BC, Schnell EC, Dettori JR, Jeyamohan S, Oskouian R - Global Spine J (2016)

Bottom Line: There was no clear pattern of pulmonary complications with respect to surgical approach.Conclusions There is insufficient data to determine the risk of pulmonary complications following anterior, posterior, or lateral approaches to the thoracic spine.Methods for assessing pulmonary complications were not well reported, and data is sparse.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Swedish Neuroscience Institute, Seattle, Washington, United States.

ABSTRACT
Study Design Systematic review. Objective To determine the frequency of pulmonary effusion, pneumothorax, and hemothorax in adult patients undergoing thoracic corpectomy or osteotomy for any condition and to determine if these frequencies vary by surgical approach (i.e., anterior, posterior, or lateral). Methods Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched through September 21, 2015, to identify studies specifically evaluating the frequency of pulmonary effusion, pneumothorax, and hemothorax in patients undergoing thoracic spine surgery. Results Fourteen studies, 13 retrospective and 1 prospective, met inclusion criteria. The frequency across studies of pulmonary effusion ranged from 0 to 77%; for hemothorax, 0 to 77%; and for pneumothorax, 0 to 50%. There was no clear pattern of pulmonary complications with respect to surgical approach. Conclusions There is insufficient data to determine the risk of pulmonary complications following anterior, posterior, or lateral approaches to the thoracic spine. Methods for assessing pulmonary complications were not well reported, and data is sparse.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart showing results of literature search.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection


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FI1600007supl-1: Flowchart showing results of literature search.

Mentions: We identified 14 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. These studies form the basis for this report. Fig. 1 shows the inclusion and exclusion of articles from the search. A list of excluded articles can be found in the online supplementary material.


Pulmonary Complications following Thoracic Spinal Surgery: A Systematic Review.

Gabel BC, Schnell EC, Dettori JR, Jeyamohan S, Oskouian R - Global Spine J (2016)

Flowchart showing results of literature search.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836931&req=5

FI1600007supl-1: Flowchart showing results of literature search.
Mentions: We identified 14 studies meeting the inclusion criteria. These studies form the basis for this report. Fig. 1 shows the inclusion and exclusion of articles from the search. A list of excluded articles can be found in the online supplementary material.

Bottom Line: There was no clear pattern of pulmonary complications with respect to surgical approach.Conclusions There is insufficient data to determine the risk of pulmonary complications following anterior, posterior, or lateral approaches to the thoracic spine.Methods for assessing pulmonary complications were not well reported, and data is sparse.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Swedish Neuroscience Institute, Seattle, Washington, United States.

ABSTRACT
Study Design Systematic review. Objective To determine the frequency of pulmonary effusion, pneumothorax, and hemothorax in adult patients undergoing thoracic corpectomy or osteotomy for any condition and to determine if these frequencies vary by surgical approach (i.e., anterior, posterior, or lateral). Methods Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched through September 21, 2015, to identify studies specifically evaluating the frequency of pulmonary effusion, pneumothorax, and hemothorax in patients undergoing thoracic spine surgery. Results Fourteen studies, 13 retrospective and 1 prospective, met inclusion criteria. The frequency across studies of pulmonary effusion ranged from 0 to 77%; for hemothorax, 0 to 77%; and for pneumothorax, 0 to 50%. There was no clear pattern of pulmonary complications with respect to surgical approach. Conclusions There is insufficient data to determine the risk of pulmonary complications following anterior, posterior, or lateral approaches to the thoracic spine. Methods for assessing pulmonary complications were not well reported, and data is sparse.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus