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Exploring Factors Associated with Recent HIV Testing among Heterosexuals at High Risk for HIV Infection Recruited with Venue-based Sampling.

Gwadz M, Cleland CM, Jenness SM, Silverman E, Hagan H, Ritchie AS, Leonard NR, McCright-Gill T, Martinez B, Swain Q, Kutnick A, Sherpa D - J AIDS Clin Res (2016)

Bottom Line: Most HRH had tested at least once (94%), and more than half had tested within the past year (58%), but only 37% tested annually.In both men and women, the odds of recent testing were similar and associated with structural factors (better access to testing) and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing and diagnosis.Such improvements could increase early detection of HIV, improve the long-term health of individuals, and reduce HIV transmission by increasing rates of viral suppression.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: New York University College of Nursing, USA.

ABSTRACT

Annual HIV testing is recommended for high-risk populations in the United States, to identify HIV infections early and provide timely linkage to treatment. However, heterosexuals at high risk for HIV, due to their residence in urban areas of high poverty and elevated HIV prevalence, test for HIV less frequently than other risk groups, and late diagnosis of HIV is common. Yet the factors impeding HIV testing in this group, which is predominantly African American/Black and Latino/Hispanic, are poorly understood. The present study addresses this gap. Using a systematic community-based sampling method, venue-based sampling (VBS), we estimate rates of lifetime and recent (past year) HIV testing among high-risk heterosexuals (HRH), and explore a set of putative multi-level barriers to and facilitators of recent testing, by gender. Participants were 338 HRH African American/Black and Latino/Hispanic adults recruited using VBS, who completed a computerized structured assessment battery guided by the Theory of Triadic Influence, comprised of reliable/valid measures on socio-demographic characteristics, HIV testing history, and multi-level barriers to HIV testing. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with HIV testing within the past year. Most HRH had tested at least once (94%), and more than half had tested within the past year (58%), but only 37% tested annually. In both men and women, the odds of recent testing were similar and associated with structural factors (better access to testing) and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing and diagnosis. Thus VBS identified serious gaps in rates of annual HIV testing among HRH. Improvements in access to high-quality HIV testing and leveraging of STI testing are needed to increase the proportion of HRH testing annually for HIV. Such improvements could increase early detection of HIV, improve the long-term health of individuals, and reduce HIV transmission by increasing rates of viral suppression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Core high-risk area (HRA) in the borough of Brooklyn.
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Figure 1: Core high-risk area (HRA) in the borough of Brooklyn.

Mentions: The study was located in a well-defined HRA in Brooklyn, the borough (out of five boroughs) in New York City with the highest local heterosexual HIV prevalence. The HRA was defined at the inception of the study by rank ordering all postal zip codes in Brooklyn based on levels of heterosexual HIV prevalence and household poverty. A core HRA was then selected from that listing that comprised of the top 25% of zip codes on the HRA index (seven contiguous zip codes in total; (Figure 1) [26].


Exploring Factors Associated with Recent HIV Testing among Heterosexuals at High Risk for HIV Infection Recruited with Venue-based Sampling.

Gwadz M, Cleland CM, Jenness SM, Silverman E, Hagan H, Ritchie AS, Leonard NR, McCright-Gill T, Martinez B, Swain Q, Kutnick A, Sherpa D - J AIDS Clin Res (2016)

Core high-risk area (HRA) in the borough of Brooklyn.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836844&req=5

Figure 1: Core high-risk area (HRA) in the borough of Brooklyn.
Mentions: The study was located in a well-defined HRA in Brooklyn, the borough (out of five boroughs) in New York City with the highest local heterosexual HIV prevalence. The HRA was defined at the inception of the study by rank ordering all postal zip codes in Brooklyn based on levels of heterosexual HIV prevalence and household poverty. A core HRA was then selected from that listing that comprised of the top 25% of zip codes on the HRA index (seven contiguous zip codes in total; (Figure 1) [26].

Bottom Line: Most HRH had tested at least once (94%), and more than half had tested within the past year (58%), but only 37% tested annually.In both men and women, the odds of recent testing were similar and associated with structural factors (better access to testing) and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing and diagnosis.Such improvements could increase early detection of HIV, improve the long-term health of individuals, and reduce HIV transmission by increasing rates of viral suppression.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: New York University College of Nursing, USA.

ABSTRACT

Annual HIV testing is recommended for high-risk populations in the United States, to identify HIV infections early and provide timely linkage to treatment. However, heterosexuals at high risk for HIV, due to their residence in urban areas of high poverty and elevated HIV prevalence, test for HIV less frequently than other risk groups, and late diagnosis of HIV is common. Yet the factors impeding HIV testing in this group, which is predominantly African American/Black and Latino/Hispanic, are poorly understood. The present study addresses this gap. Using a systematic community-based sampling method, venue-based sampling (VBS), we estimate rates of lifetime and recent (past year) HIV testing among high-risk heterosexuals (HRH), and explore a set of putative multi-level barriers to and facilitators of recent testing, by gender. Participants were 338 HRH African American/Black and Latino/Hispanic adults recruited using VBS, who completed a computerized structured assessment battery guided by the Theory of Triadic Influence, comprised of reliable/valid measures on socio-demographic characteristics, HIV testing history, and multi-level barriers to HIV testing. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with HIV testing within the past year. Most HRH had tested at least once (94%), and more than half had tested within the past year (58%), but only 37% tested annually. In both men and women, the odds of recent testing were similar and associated with structural factors (better access to testing) and sexually transmitted infection (STI) testing and diagnosis. Thus VBS identified serious gaps in rates of annual HIV testing among HRH. Improvements in access to high-quality HIV testing and leveraging of STI testing are needed to increase the proportion of HRH testing annually for HIV. Such improvements could increase early detection of HIV, improve the long-term health of individuals, and reduce HIV transmission by increasing rates of viral suppression.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus