Limits...
Association between Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Gut Microbiota.

Guo Y, Qi Y, Yang X, Zhao L, Wen S, Liu Y, Tang L - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: Their ovarian morphologies normalized.The composition of gut microbiota restored in both FMT and Lactobacillus treated groups with increasing of Lactobacillus and Clostridium, and decreasing of Prevotella.These results indicated that dysbiosis of gut microbiota was associated with the pathogenesis of PCOS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microecology, School of Basic Medical Science, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning, China.

ABSTRACT
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most frequent endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age. It is difficult to treat PCOS because of its complex etiology and pathogenesis. Here, we characterized the roles of gut microbiota on the pathogenesis and treatments in letrozole (a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor) induced PCOS rat model. Changes in estrous cycles, hormonal levels, ovarian morphology and gut microbiota by PCR-DGGE and real-time PCR were determined. The results showed that PCOS rats displayed abnormal estrous cycles with increasing androgen biosynthesis and exhibited multiple large cysts with diminished granulosa layers in ovarian tissues. Meanwhile, the composition of gut microbiota in letrozole-treated rats was different from that in the controls. Lactobacillus, Ruminococcus and Clostridium were lower while Prevotella was higher in PCOS rats when compared with control rats. After treating PCOS rats with Lactobacillus and fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from healthy rats, it was found that the estrous cycles were improved in all 8 rats in FMT group, and in 6 of the 8 rats in Lactobacillus transplantation group with decreasing androgen biosynthesis. Their ovarian morphologies normalized. The composition of gut microbiota restored in both FMT and Lactobacillus treated groups with increasing of Lactobacillus and Clostridium, and decreasing of Prevotella. These results indicated that dysbiosis of gut microbiota was associated with the pathogenesis of PCOS. Microbiota interventions through FMT and Lactobacillus transplantation were beneficial for the treatments of PCOS rats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Microbiota profiles in PCOS rats.(A) DGGE profiles in the fecal microbiota of control group and PCOS group (control group: C1-C6; PCOS group: P1-P6). Arrows 1–7 were the bands selected for sequence. (B) Cluster analysis of the DGGE profiles. The dendrogram was constructed using UPGMA method. (C) Principal component analysis (PCA) of fecal microbiota based on DGGE fingerprints. Samples grouped in a solid circle represented fecal microbiota of PCOS group.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836746&req=5

pone.0153196.g002: Microbiota profiles in PCOS rats.(A) DGGE profiles in the fecal microbiota of control group and PCOS group (control group: C1-C6; PCOS group: P1-P6). Arrows 1–7 were the bands selected for sequence. (B) Cluster analysis of the DGGE profiles. The dendrogram was constructed using UPGMA method. (C) Principal component analysis (PCA) of fecal microbiota based on DGGE fingerprints. Samples grouped in a solid circle represented fecal microbiota of PCOS group.

Mentions: To characterize gut microbiota shift in PCOS rats, we performed a global survey of the microbiota in fecal samples. Genetic fingerprints of the gut bacterial communities generated by DGGE analysis showed shifts of the bacterial composition and diversity in feces. It could be observed that some bands became more intense, such as band 3 (Fig 2A). However, the changes of the DGGE band profiles were difficult to be quantified by observation. Therefore, we utilized similarity and Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean (UPGMA) as a cluster method to demonstrate band pattern similarity. The similarity matrix indicated a 60.1% and 66.9% similarity within the control group and PCOS group, respectively, but only a 58.3% similarity between the two groups (data not shown). Clustering analysis based on the similarity indices showed that PCOS group and the control group clustered in a different branch (Fig 2B). Though two PCOS rats were clustered in the control group, they were in different branches. Principal component analysis (PCA) of DGGE fingerprints further confirmed the differences of gut microbiota between PCOS group and control group. Microbiota structure of the PCOS group showed a separation from the control group by PCA axis 1 and 2. Gut microbiota in PCOS group differed considerably from the control group by moving towards right of PCA axis 1 and down of PCA axis 2 (Fig 2C). These findings indicated that PCOS resulted in a redistribution of the relative abundances of bacterial phyla with the gut microbiota.


Association between Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Gut Microbiota.

Guo Y, Qi Y, Yang X, Zhao L, Wen S, Liu Y, Tang L - PLoS ONE (2016)

Microbiota profiles in PCOS rats.(A) DGGE profiles in the fecal microbiota of control group and PCOS group (control group: C1-C6; PCOS group: P1-P6). Arrows 1–7 were the bands selected for sequence. (B) Cluster analysis of the DGGE profiles. The dendrogram was constructed using UPGMA method. (C) Principal component analysis (PCA) of fecal microbiota based on DGGE fingerprints. Samples grouped in a solid circle represented fecal microbiota of PCOS group.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836746&req=5

pone.0153196.g002: Microbiota profiles in PCOS rats.(A) DGGE profiles in the fecal microbiota of control group and PCOS group (control group: C1-C6; PCOS group: P1-P6). Arrows 1–7 were the bands selected for sequence. (B) Cluster analysis of the DGGE profiles. The dendrogram was constructed using UPGMA method. (C) Principal component analysis (PCA) of fecal microbiota based on DGGE fingerprints. Samples grouped in a solid circle represented fecal microbiota of PCOS group.
Mentions: To characterize gut microbiota shift in PCOS rats, we performed a global survey of the microbiota in fecal samples. Genetic fingerprints of the gut bacterial communities generated by DGGE analysis showed shifts of the bacterial composition and diversity in feces. It could be observed that some bands became more intense, such as band 3 (Fig 2A). However, the changes of the DGGE band profiles were difficult to be quantified by observation. Therefore, we utilized similarity and Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean (UPGMA) as a cluster method to demonstrate band pattern similarity. The similarity matrix indicated a 60.1% and 66.9% similarity within the control group and PCOS group, respectively, but only a 58.3% similarity between the two groups (data not shown). Clustering analysis based on the similarity indices showed that PCOS group and the control group clustered in a different branch (Fig 2B). Though two PCOS rats were clustered in the control group, they were in different branches. Principal component analysis (PCA) of DGGE fingerprints further confirmed the differences of gut microbiota between PCOS group and control group. Microbiota structure of the PCOS group showed a separation from the control group by PCA axis 1 and 2. Gut microbiota in PCOS group differed considerably from the control group by moving towards right of PCA axis 1 and down of PCA axis 2 (Fig 2C). These findings indicated that PCOS resulted in a redistribution of the relative abundances of bacterial phyla with the gut microbiota.

Bottom Line: Their ovarian morphologies normalized.The composition of gut microbiota restored in both FMT and Lactobacillus treated groups with increasing of Lactobacillus and Clostridium, and decreasing of Prevotella.These results indicated that dysbiosis of gut microbiota was associated with the pathogenesis of PCOS.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Microecology, School of Basic Medical Science, Dalian Medical University, Dalian, Liaoning, China.

ABSTRACT
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most frequent endocrinopathy in women of reproductive age. It is difficult to treat PCOS because of its complex etiology and pathogenesis. Here, we characterized the roles of gut microbiota on the pathogenesis and treatments in letrozole (a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor) induced PCOS rat model. Changes in estrous cycles, hormonal levels, ovarian morphology and gut microbiota by PCR-DGGE and real-time PCR were determined. The results showed that PCOS rats displayed abnormal estrous cycles with increasing androgen biosynthesis and exhibited multiple large cysts with diminished granulosa layers in ovarian tissues. Meanwhile, the composition of gut microbiota in letrozole-treated rats was different from that in the controls. Lactobacillus, Ruminococcus and Clostridium were lower while Prevotella was higher in PCOS rats when compared with control rats. After treating PCOS rats with Lactobacillus and fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) from healthy rats, it was found that the estrous cycles were improved in all 8 rats in FMT group, and in 6 of the 8 rats in Lactobacillus transplantation group with decreasing androgen biosynthesis. Their ovarian morphologies normalized. The composition of gut microbiota restored in both FMT and Lactobacillus treated groups with increasing of Lactobacillus and Clostridium, and decreasing of Prevotella. These results indicated that dysbiosis of gut microbiota was associated with the pathogenesis of PCOS. Microbiota interventions through FMT and Lactobacillus transplantation were beneficial for the treatments of PCOS rats.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus