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Impact of the Chromatin Remodeling Factor CHD1 on Gut Microbiome Composition of Drosophila melanogaster.

Sebald J, Willi M, Schoberleitner I, Krogsdam A, Orth-Höller D, Trajanoski Z, Lusser A - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: Using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we found that Chd1 deletion mutant flies exhibit significantly reduced microbial diversity compared to rescued control strains.Finally, diet supplementation experiments with Lactobacillus plantarum revealed that, in contrast to wild-type flies, Chd1 mutant flies were unable to maintain higher L. plantarum titres over time.Collectively, these data provide evidence that loss of the chromatin remodeler CHD1 has a major impact on the gut microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Molecular Biology, Biocenter, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.

ABSTRACT
The composition of the intestinal microbiota of Drosophila has been studied in some detail in recent years. Environmental, developmental and host-specific genetic factors influence microbiome composition in the fly. Our previous work has indicated that intestinal bacterial load can be affected by chromatin-targeted regulatory mechanisms. Here we studied a potential role of the conserved chromatin assembly and remodeling factor CHD1 in the shaping of the gut microbiome in Drosophila melanogaster. Using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we found that Chd1 deletion mutant flies exhibit significantly reduced microbial diversity compared to rescued control strains. Specifically, although Acetobacteraceae dominated the microbiota of both Chd1 wild-type and mutant guts, Chd1 mutants were virtually monoassociated with this bacterial family, whereas in control flies other bacterial taxa constituted ~20% of the microbiome. We further show age-linked differences in microbial load and microbiota composition between Chd1 mutant and control flies. Finally, diet supplementation experiments with Lactobacillus plantarum revealed that, in contrast to wild-type flies, Chd1 mutant flies were unable to maintain higher L. plantarum titres over time. Collectively, these data provide evidence that loss of the chromatin remodeler CHD1 has a major impact on the gut microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Time-dependent decrease in supplemented L. plantarum in Chd1-/- but not Chd1WT/WT flies.Flies were fed on L. plantarum overnight, transferred to fresh food vials and collected at the indicated days after inoculation. (A) Lactobacillus load was determined by plating fly homogenates on MRS agar; (B) L. plantarum was detected by real-time PCR. Signals were normalized against the Drosophila GAPDH gene and mean values ±SEM of three biological replicates are shown. Significant differences between the two fly lines were analyzed by t-test (level of significance set to p<0.05) and are marked by (*).
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pone.0153476.g004: Time-dependent decrease in supplemented L. plantarum in Chd1-/- but not Chd1WT/WT flies.Flies were fed on L. plantarum overnight, transferred to fresh food vials and collected at the indicated days after inoculation. (A) Lactobacillus load was determined by plating fly homogenates on MRS agar; (B) L. plantarum was detected by real-time PCR. Signals were normalized against the Drosophila GAPDH gene and mean values ±SEM of three biological replicates are shown. Significant differences between the two fly lines were analyzed by t-test (level of significance set to p<0.05) and are marked by (*).

Mentions: Our plating assays showed that L. plantarum levels were already decreased in one-day old Chd1 mutant flies compared to wild-type flies. To determine, if elevating Lactobacillus levels in young flies would prevent its observed diminishment in the guts of Chd1-/- flies at later stages of life, we fed 4-day old Chd1 mutant and control flies with a bacterial suspension of L. plantarum overnight, subsequently transferred the flies to standard food vials, and determined Lactobacillus titres by plating fly homogenates on MRS agar and by qPCR with L. plantarum-specific primers. Both assays clearly showed that while L. plantarum load did not significantly change over a period of 21 days in control flies, it decreased continuously in Chd1 mutant flies despite equal initial titres in both strains (Fig 4A and 4B). These results suggest that the environment in Chd1-/- guts discriminates against the growth of bacteria such as Lactobacillus, while it promotes accumulation of Acetobacter sp.


Impact of the Chromatin Remodeling Factor CHD1 on Gut Microbiome Composition of Drosophila melanogaster.

Sebald J, Willi M, Schoberleitner I, Krogsdam A, Orth-Höller D, Trajanoski Z, Lusser A - PLoS ONE (2016)

Time-dependent decrease in supplemented L. plantarum in Chd1-/- but not Chd1WT/WT flies.Flies were fed on L. plantarum overnight, transferred to fresh food vials and collected at the indicated days after inoculation. (A) Lactobacillus load was determined by plating fly homogenates on MRS agar; (B) L. plantarum was detected by real-time PCR. Signals were normalized against the Drosophila GAPDH gene and mean values ±SEM of three biological replicates are shown. Significant differences between the two fly lines were analyzed by t-test (level of significance set to p<0.05) and are marked by (*).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836739&req=5

pone.0153476.g004: Time-dependent decrease in supplemented L. plantarum in Chd1-/- but not Chd1WT/WT flies.Flies were fed on L. plantarum overnight, transferred to fresh food vials and collected at the indicated days after inoculation. (A) Lactobacillus load was determined by plating fly homogenates on MRS agar; (B) L. plantarum was detected by real-time PCR. Signals were normalized against the Drosophila GAPDH gene and mean values ±SEM of three biological replicates are shown. Significant differences between the two fly lines were analyzed by t-test (level of significance set to p<0.05) and are marked by (*).
Mentions: Our plating assays showed that L. plantarum levels were already decreased in one-day old Chd1 mutant flies compared to wild-type flies. To determine, if elevating Lactobacillus levels in young flies would prevent its observed diminishment in the guts of Chd1-/- flies at later stages of life, we fed 4-day old Chd1 mutant and control flies with a bacterial suspension of L. plantarum overnight, subsequently transferred the flies to standard food vials, and determined Lactobacillus titres by plating fly homogenates on MRS agar and by qPCR with L. plantarum-specific primers. Both assays clearly showed that while L. plantarum load did not significantly change over a period of 21 days in control flies, it decreased continuously in Chd1 mutant flies despite equal initial titres in both strains (Fig 4A and 4B). These results suggest that the environment in Chd1-/- guts discriminates against the growth of bacteria such as Lactobacillus, while it promotes accumulation of Acetobacter sp.

Bottom Line: Using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we found that Chd1 deletion mutant flies exhibit significantly reduced microbial diversity compared to rescued control strains.Finally, diet supplementation experiments with Lactobacillus plantarum revealed that, in contrast to wild-type flies, Chd1 mutant flies were unable to maintain higher L. plantarum titres over time.Collectively, these data provide evidence that loss of the chromatin remodeler CHD1 has a major impact on the gut microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Molecular Biology, Biocenter, Medical University of Innsbruck, Innsbruck, Austria.

ABSTRACT
The composition of the intestinal microbiota of Drosophila has been studied in some detail in recent years. Environmental, developmental and host-specific genetic factors influence microbiome composition in the fly. Our previous work has indicated that intestinal bacterial load can be affected by chromatin-targeted regulatory mechanisms. Here we studied a potential role of the conserved chromatin assembly and remodeling factor CHD1 in the shaping of the gut microbiome in Drosophila melanogaster. Using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA gene amplicons, we found that Chd1 deletion mutant flies exhibit significantly reduced microbial diversity compared to rescued control strains. Specifically, although Acetobacteraceae dominated the microbiota of both Chd1 wild-type and mutant guts, Chd1 mutants were virtually monoassociated with this bacterial family, whereas in control flies other bacterial taxa constituted ~20% of the microbiome. We further show age-linked differences in microbial load and microbiota composition between Chd1 mutant and control flies. Finally, diet supplementation experiments with Lactobacillus plantarum revealed that, in contrast to wild-type flies, Chd1 mutant flies were unable to maintain higher L. plantarum titres over time. Collectively, these data provide evidence that loss of the chromatin remodeler CHD1 has a major impact on the gut microbiome of Drosophila melanogaster.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus