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A Missense Mutation in the Zinc Finger Domain of OsCESA7 Deleteriously Affects Cellulose Biosynthesis and Plant Growth in Rice.

Wang D, Qin Y, Fang J, Yuan S, Peng L, Zhao J, Li X - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: The brittle culms resulted from reduced mechanical strength due to a defect in thickening of the sclerenchyma cell wall and reduced cellulose content in the culms of the S1-24 mutant.The OsCESA7 gene is expressed predominantly in the culm at the mature stage, particularly in mechanical tissues such as vascular bundles and sclerenchyma cells, consistent with the brittle phenotype in the culm.These results indicate that OsCESA7 plays an important role in cellulose biosynthesis and plant growth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Key Facility for Crop Gene Resources and Genetic Improvement, Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Rice is a model plant species for the study of cellulose biosynthesis. We isolated a mutant, S1-24, from ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-treated plants of the japonica rice cultivar, Nipponbare. The mutant exhibited brittle culms and other pleiotropic phenotypes such as dwarfism and partial sterility. The brittle culms resulted from reduced mechanical strength due to a defect in thickening of the sclerenchyma cell wall and reduced cellulose content in the culms of the S1-24 mutant. Map-based gene cloning and a complementation assay showed that phenotypes of the S1-24 mutant were caused by a recessive point mutation in the OsCESA7 gene, which encodes cellulose synthase A subunit 7. The missense mutation changed the highly conserved C40 to Y in the zinc finger domain. The OsCESA7 gene is expressed predominantly in the culm at the mature stage, particularly in mechanical tissues such as vascular bundles and sclerenchyma cells, consistent with the brittle phenotype in the culm. These results indicate that OsCESA7 plays an important role in cellulose biosynthesis and plant growth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Expression pattern of OsCESA7 revealed by GUS-staining in OsCESA7promoter: GUS transgenic plants.(A) A segment of leaf blade. (B) Leaf blade cross section. (C) Magnified image of the root. (D) Leaf sheath. (E) Leaf sheath cross section. (F) Spikelet. (G) Stem. (H) Stem cross section. Signals were detected in vascular bundles, especially in sclerenchyma cells.
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pone.0153993.g008: Expression pattern of OsCESA7 revealed by GUS-staining in OsCESA7promoter: GUS transgenic plants.(A) A segment of leaf blade. (B) Leaf blade cross section. (C) Magnified image of the root. (D) Leaf sheath. (E) Leaf sheath cross section. (F) Spikelet. (G) Stem. (H) Stem cross section. Signals were detected in vascular bundles, especially in sclerenchyma cells.

Mentions: The expression levels of OsCESA7 in various rice organs were examined by semiquantitative and quantitative RT-PCR. The OsCESA7 gene was expressed predominantly in the culm of mature stage plants, consistent with the brittle culm phenotype in the S1-24 mutant. In addition, the OsCESA7 gene was also highly expressed in panicles at the mature stage. In contrast, expression levels were relatively low in roots, leaf blades, and leaf sheaths at the seedling stage (Fig 7). Furthermore, detailed expression pattern of the OsCESA7 gene was examined by histological staining of the transgenic plants harboring the OsCESA7 promoter driven GUS reporter gene. In total, 5 transgenic lines and 48 independent transgenic plants were obtained, and GUS signals were found to be positive in 38 plants of 4 lines. As shown in Fig 8, GUS signals were observed primarily in mechanical tissues, such as vascular bundles in leaf blades (Fig 8A and 8B), leaf sheaths (Fig 8D and 8E), glumes (Fig 8F), roots (Fig 8C), and sclerenchyma cells in the outer layers of culms (Fig 8G and 8H). These observations indicate that OsCESA7 is expressed throughout the plant with high expression in mechanical tissues.


A Missense Mutation in the Zinc Finger Domain of OsCESA7 Deleteriously Affects Cellulose Biosynthesis and Plant Growth in Rice.

Wang D, Qin Y, Fang J, Yuan S, Peng L, Zhao J, Li X - PLoS ONE (2016)

Expression pattern of OsCESA7 revealed by GUS-staining in OsCESA7promoter: GUS transgenic plants.(A) A segment of leaf blade. (B) Leaf blade cross section. (C) Magnified image of the root. (D) Leaf sheath. (E) Leaf sheath cross section. (F) Spikelet. (G) Stem. (H) Stem cross section. Signals were detected in vascular bundles, especially in sclerenchyma cells.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836682&req=5

pone.0153993.g008: Expression pattern of OsCESA7 revealed by GUS-staining in OsCESA7promoter: GUS transgenic plants.(A) A segment of leaf blade. (B) Leaf blade cross section. (C) Magnified image of the root. (D) Leaf sheath. (E) Leaf sheath cross section. (F) Spikelet. (G) Stem. (H) Stem cross section. Signals were detected in vascular bundles, especially in sclerenchyma cells.
Mentions: The expression levels of OsCESA7 in various rice organs were examined by semiquantitative and quantitative RT-PCR. The OsCESA7 gene was expressed predominantly in the culm of mature stage plants, consistent with the brittle culm phenotype in the S1-24 mutant. In addition, the OsCESA7 gene was also highly expressed in panicles at the mature stage. In contrast, expression levels were relatively low in roots, leaf blades, and leaf sheaths at the seedling stage (Fig 7). Furthermore, detailed expression pattern of the OsCESA7 gene was examined by histological staining of the transgenic plants harboring the OsCESA7 promoter driven GUS reporter gene. In total, 5 transgenic lines and 48 independent transgenic plants were obtained, and GUS signals were found to be positive in 38 plants of 4 lines. As shown in Fig 8, GUS signals were observed primarily in mechanical tissues, such as vascular bundles in leaf blades (Fig 8A and 8B), leaf sheaths (Fig 8D and 8E), glumes (Fig 8F), roots (Fig 8C), and sclerenchyma cells in the outer layers of culms (Fig 8G and 8H). These observations indicate that OsCESA7 is expressed throughout the plant with high expression in mechanical tissues.

Bottom Line: The brittle culms resulted from reduced mechanical strength due to a defect in thickening of the sclerenchyma cell wall and reduced cellulose content in the culms of the S1-24 mutant.The OsCESA7 gene is expressed predominantly in the culm at the mature stage, particularly in mechanical tissues such as vascular bundles and sclerenchyma cells, consistent with the brittle phenotype in the culm.These results indicate that OsCESA7 plays an important role in cellulose biosynthesis and plant growth.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: National Key Facility for Crop Gene Resources and Genetic Improvement, Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
Rice is a model plant species for the study of cellulose biosynthesis. We isolated a mutant, S1-24, from ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS)-treated plants of the japonica rice cultivar, Nipponbare. The mutant exhibited brittle culms and other pleiotropic phenotypes such as dwarfism and partial sterility. The brittle culms resulted from reduced mechanical strength due to a defect in thickening of the sclerenchyma cell wall and reduced cellulose content in the culms of the S1-24 mutant. Map-based gene cloning and a complementation assay showed that phenotypes of the S1-24 mutant were caused by a recessive point mutation in the OsCESA7 gene, which encodes cellulose synthase A subunit 7. The missense mutation changed the highly conserved C40 to Y in the zinc finger domain. The OsCESA7 gene is expressed predominantly in the culm at the mature stage, particularly in mechanical tissues such as vascular bundles and sclerenchyma cells, consistent with the brittle phenotype in the culm. These results indicate that OsCESA7 plays an important role in cellulose biosynthesis and plant growth.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus