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Assessment of Crop Damage by Protected Wild Mammalian Herbivores on the Western Boundary of Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve (TATR), Central India.

Bayani A, Tiwade D, Dongre A, Dongre AP, Phatak R, Watve M - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: Since there is orders of magnitude difference between farmers' perception of damage and the compensation given by the government, an objective and realistic estimate of damage was found essential.These approaches highlight different aspects of the problem but converge on an estimated damage of over 50% for the fields adjacent to the forest, gradually reducing in intensity with distance.We found that the visual damage assessment method currently employed by the government for paying compensation to farmers was uncorrelated to and grossly underestimated actual damage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Crop raiding by wild herbivores close to an area of protected wildlife is a serious problem that can potentially undermine conservation efforts. Since there is orders of magnitude difference between farmers' perception of damage and the compensation given by the government, an objective and realistic estimate of damage was found essential. We employed four different approaches to estimate the extent of and patterns in crop damage by wild herbivores along the western boundary of Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve in the state of Maharashtra, central India. These approaches highlight different aspects of the problem but converge on an estimated damage of over 50% for the fields adjacent to the forest, gradually reducing in intensity with distance. We found that the visual damage assessment method currently employed by the government for paying compensation to farmers was uncorrelated to and grossly underestimated actual damage. The findings necessitate a radical rethinking of policies to assess, mitigate as well as compensate for crop damage caused by protected wildlife species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparison of grain yield at harvest in fenced and non-fenced plots for 4 crops in two seasons.A: rice, B: soybean, C: chickpea, D: wheat. Soybean in 2013–14 and chickpea in 2014–15 failed due to reasons other than herbivory.
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pone.0153854.g005: Comparison of grain yield at harvest in fenced and non-fenced plots for 4 crops in two seasons.A: rice, B: soybean, C: chickpea, D: wheat. Soybean in 2013–14 and chickpea in 2014–15 failed due to reasons other than herbivory.

Mentions: In all four experimental crops cultivated over two seasons, the non-fenced plots faced severe damage due to herbivory compared to the fenced plots. The fenced plots were not completely protected. Indian hare (Lepus nigricollis) were observed to make their way through the fence frequently. Nilgai, chital and wild pigs demonstrated their ability to negotiate the fence on occasions although the frequency of their visits to fenced and unfenced areas was substantially different. Most instances of entering the fenced areas were after the crops on the neighboring unfenced areas were almost completely devoured. Grain harvest at the end of the season revealed that wheat, soybean and chickpea faced 100% loss in the unprotected and unguarded farms. Rice was least damaged but still faced a 68% loss in the unfenced unguarded areas in 2013. In 2014, owing to unfavorable rainfall pattern accompanied by a disease, the overall rice crop suffered substantially. In this season, the unprotected area yielded nil, whereas the protected area yielded 7.68 Q/Ha (Fig 5).


Assessment of Crop Damage by Protected Wild Mammalian Herbivores on the Western Boundary of Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve (TATR), Central India.

Bayani A, Tiwade D, Dongre A, Dongre AP, Phatak R, Watve M - PLoS ONE (2016)

Comparison of grain yield at harvest in fenced and non-fenced plots for 4 crops in two seasons.A: rice, B: soybean, C: chickpea, D: wheat. Soybean in 2013–14 and chickpea in 2014–15 failed due to reasons other than herbivory.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836666&req=5

pone.0153854.g005: Comparison of grain yield at harvest in fenced and non-fenced plots for 4 crops in two seasons.A: rice, B: soybean, C: chickpea, D: wheat. Soybean in 2013–14 and chickpea in 2014–15 failed due to reasons other than herbivory.
Mentions: In all four experimental crops cultivated over two seasons, the non-fenced plots faced severe damage due to herbivory compared to the fenced plots. The fenced plots were not completely protected. Indian hare (Lepus nigricollis) were observed to make their way through the fence frequently. Nilgai, chital and wild pigs demonstrated their ability to negotiate the fence on occasions although the frequency of their visits to fenced and unfenced areas was substantially different. Most instances of entering the fenced areas were after the crops on the neighboring unfenced areas were almost completely devoured. Grain harvest at the end of the season revealed that wheat, soybean and chickpea faced 100% loss in the unprotected and unguarded farms. Rice was least damaged but still faced a 68% loss in the unfenced unguarded areas in 2013. In 2014, owing to unfavorable rainfall pattern accompanied by a disease, the overall rice crop suffered substantially. In this season, the unprotected area yielded nil, whereas the protected area yielded 7.68 Q/Ha (Fig 5).

Bottom Line: Since there is orders of magnitude difference between farmers' perception of damage and the compensation given by the government, an objective and realistic estimate of damage was found essential.These approaches highlight different aspects of the problem but converge on an estimated damage of over 50% for the fields adjacent to the forest, gradually reducing in intensity with distance.We found that the visual damage assessment method currently employed by the government for paying compensation to farmers was uncorrelated to and grossly underestimated actual damage.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Indian Institute of Science Education and Research (IISER), Pune, Dr. Homi Bhabha Road, Pashan, Pune 411008, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Crop raiding by wild herbivores close to an area of protected wildlife is a serious problem that can potentially undermine conservation efforts. Since there is orders of magnitude difference between farmers' perception of damage and the compensation given by the government, an objective and realistic estimate of damage was found essential. We employed four different approaches to estimate the extent of and patterns in crop damage by wild herbivores along the western boundary of Tadoba-Andhari Tiger Reserve in the state of Maharashtra, central India. These approaches highlight different aspects of the problem but converge on an estimated damage of over 50% for the fields adjacent to the forest, gradually reducing in intensity with distance. We found that the visual damage assessment method currently employed by the government for paying compensation to farmers was uncorrelated to and grossly underestimated actual damage. The findings necessitate a radical rethinking of policies to assess, mitigate as well as compensate for crop damage caused by protected wildlife species.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus