Limits...
Bidirectional Association between Asthma and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Two Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Studies.

Shen TC, Lin CL, Wei CC, Chen CH, Tu CY, Hsia TC, Shih CM, Hsu WH, Sung FC, Kao CH - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: The aHRs remained significant in all subgroups measured by sex, age and the presence of comorbidities.Similarly, aHRs remained significant in all subgroups measured by sex, age and the presence of comorbidities.Atopy could be a shared pathophysiology underlying this association, deserving a further investigation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine Science, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a demonstrated association between asthma and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this study, we examined the bidirectional association between asthma and IBS using a nationwide database.

Methods: We conducted two retrospective cohort studies using data obtained from the National Health Insurance of Taiwan. Study 1 included 29,648 asthma patients newly diagnosed between 2000 and 2010. Study 2 included 29,875 IBS patient newly diagnosed between 2000 and 2010. For each study, four subjects without asthma and IBS were selected, respectively, frequency-matched by sex, age, and the diagnosis date. All four cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011 to estimate incident IBS for Study 1 and incident asthma for study 2. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model after controlling for sex, age and comorbidities.

Results: The incidence of IBS was 1.89 times higher in the asthma cohort than in the comparison cohort (8.26 vs. 4.36 per 1,000 person-years), with an aHR of 1.57 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.47-1.68]. The aHRs remained significant in all subgroups measured by sex, age and the presence of comorbidities. In contrast, the incidence of asthma was 1.76 times higher in the IBS cohort than the comparison cohort (7.09 vs. 4.03 per 1,000 person-years), with an aHR of 1.54 (95% CI = 1.44-1.64). Similarly, aHRs remained significant in all subgroups measured by sex, age and the presence of comorbidities.

Conclusion: The present study suggests a bidirectional association between asthma and IBS. Atopy could be a shared pathophysiology underlying this association, deserving a further investigation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cumulative incidence of asthma for patients with (dashed line) and without (solid line) irritable bowel syndrome.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836663&req=5

pone.0153911.g003: Cumulative incidence of asthma for patients with (dashed line) and without (solid line) irritable bowel syndrome.

Mentions: After 12 years of follow-up, the cumulative incidence of asthma was 2.83% higher in the IBS cohort than in the non-IBS cohort (p < 0.001, Fig 3). The overall incidence of asthma was 1.8-fold higher in the IBS cohort than in the non-IBS cohort (7.09 vs. 4.03 per 1000 person-years), with an aHR of 1.54 (95% CI = 1.44−1.64) (Table 6). The sex-specific and age-specific IBS to non-IBS aHRs were all significant for women and men and for all age groups. Comorbidities increased the incidence of asthma in both cohorts, with the aHR (IBS cohort to the non-IBS cohort) stronger for those without comorbidity. The asthma incidence declined over time in both cohorts, but the trend of changes in the aHR (IBS cohort to the non-IBS cohort) was limited.


Bidirectional Association between Asthma and Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Two Population-Based Retrospective Cohort Studies.

Shen TC, Lin CL, Wei CC, Chen CH, Tu CY, Hsia TC, Shih CM, Hsu WH, Sung FC, Kao CH - PLoS ONE (2016)

Cumulative incidence of asthma for patients with (dashed line) and without (solid line) irritable bowel syndrome.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836663&req=5

pone.0153911.g003: Cumulative incidence of asthma for patients with (dashed line) and without (solid line) irritable bowel syndrome.
Mentions: After 12 years of follow-up, the cumulative incidence of asthma was 2.83% higher in the IBS cohort than in the non-IBS cohort (p < 0.001, Fig 3). The overall incidence of asthma was 1.8-fold higher in the IBS cohort than in the non-IBS cohort (7.09 vs. 4.03 per 1000 person-years), with an aHR of 1.54 (95% CI = 1.44−1.64) (Table 6). The sex-specific and age-specific IBS to non-IBS aHRs were all significant for women and men and for all age groups. Comorbidities increased the incidence of asthma in both cohorts, with the aHR (IBS cohort to the non-IBS cohort) stronger for those without comorbidity. The asthma incidence declined over time in both cohorts, but the trend of changes in the aHR (IBS cohort to the non-IBS cohort) was limited.

Bottom Line: The aHRs remained significant in all subgroups measured by sex, age and the presence of comorbidities.Similarly, aHRs remained significant in all subgroups measured by sex, age and the presence of comorbidities.Atopy could be a shared pathophysiology underlying this association, deserving a further investigation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine Science, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan.

ABSTRACT

Background: There is a demonstrated association between asthma and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). In this study, we examined the bidirectional association between asthma and IBS using a nationwide database.

Methods: We conducted two retrospective cohort studies using data obtained from the National Health Insurance of Taiwan. Study 1 included 29,648 asthma patients newly diagnosed between 2000 and 2010. Study 2 included 29,875 IBS patient newly diagnosed between 2000 and 2010. For each study, four subjects without asthma and IBS were selected, respectively, frequency-matched by sex, age, and the diagnosis date. All four cohorts were followed up until the end of 2011 to estimate incident IBS for Study 1 and incident asthma for study 2. Adjusted hazard ratios (aHRs) were estimated using the Cox proportional hazards model after controlling for sex, age and comorbidities.

Results: The incidence of IBS was 1.89 times higher in the asthma cohort than in the comparison cohort (8.26 vs. 4.36 per 1,000 person-years), with an aHR of 1.57 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.47-1.68]. The aHRs remained significant in all subgroups measured by sex, age and the presence of comorbidities. In contrast, the incidence of asthma was 1.76 times higher in the IBS cohort than the comparison cohort (7.09 vs. 4.03 per 1,000 person-years), with an aHR of 1.54 (95% CI = 1.44-1.64). Similarly, aHRs remained significant in all subgroups measured by sex, age and the presence of comorbidities.

Conclusion: The present study suggests a bidirectional association between asthma and IBS. Atopy could be a shared pathophysiology underlying this association, deserving a further investigation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus