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Evolution of Pre- and Post-Copulatory Traits in Male Drosophila melanogaster as a Correlated Response to Selection for Resistance to Cold Stress.

Singh K, Samant MA, Tom MT, Prasad NG - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: In Drosophila melanogaster the fitness of males depends on a broad array of reproductive traits classified as pre- and post-copulatory traits.Exposure to cold stress, can reduce sperm number, male mating ability and courtship behavior.Additionally, improved performances under stressful conditions need not necessarily trade-off with performance under benign conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Mohali, Knowledge City, Sector 81, SAS Nagar, PO Manauli, Punjab, 140306, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: In Drosophila melanogaster the fitness of males depends on a broad array of reproductive traits classified as pre- and post-copulatory traits. Exposure to cold stress, can reduce sperm number, male mating ability and courtship behavior. Therefore, it is expected that the adaptation to cold stress will involve changes in pre- and post-copulatory traits. Such evolution of reproductive traits in response to cold stress is not well studied.

Methods: We selected replicate populations of D. melanogaster for resistance to cold shock. Over 37-46 generations of selection, we investigated pre- and post-copulatory traits such as mating latency, copulation duration, mating frequency, male fertility, fitness (progeny production) and sperm competitive ability in male flies subjected to cold shock and those not subjected to cold shock.

Results: We found that post cold shock, the males from the selected populations had a significantly lower mating latency along with, higher mating frequency, fertility, sperm competitive ability and number of progeny relative to the control populations.

Conclusion: While most studies of experimental evolution of cold stress resistance have documented the evolution of survivorship in response to selection, our study clearly shows that adaptation to cold stress involves rapid changes in the pre- and post-copulatory traits. Additionally, improved performances under stressful conditions need not necessarily trade-off with performance under benign conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of cold shock (A) or no shock (B) on male fertility. Closed bars represent FCB and open bars represent FSB populations. If a female mated to a given male produced at least one egg that hatched, the male was considered to be fertile. (A) Selection and period had significant effect on male fertility. However, selection × period interaction was not significant. (B) Under no-shock treatment, there was no significant difference in male fertility between FSB and FCB males.
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pone.0153629.g004: Effect of cold shock (A) or no shock (B) on male fertility. Closed bars represent FCB and open bars represent FSB populations. If a female mated to a given male produced at least one egg that hatched, the male was considered to be fertile. (A) Selection and period had significant effect on male fertility. However, selection × period interaction was not significant. (B) Under no-shock treatment, there was no significant difference in male fertility between FSB and FCB males.

Mentions: We found a significant effect of selection and period on male fertility. FSB males were significantly more fertile (~8.5%) than FCB males (Table 2B, Fig 4A). Multiple comparisons employing Tukey’s HSD indicated that male fertility increased with increase in the time of recovery post cold shock (Fig 4A). When females were mated to males (FSB and FCB) that had recovered for different periods from cold shock, we found that fewer females mated to the males that had recovered for four hours post cold shock laid fertile eggs compared to females mated to males that had recovered for 12 or 30 hours. However, none of interactions were significant.


Evolution of Pre- and Post-Copulatory Traits in Male Drosophila melanogaster as a Correlated Response to Selection for Resistance to Cold Stress.

Singh K, Samant MA, Tom MT, Prasad NG - PLoS ONE (2016)

Effect of cold shock (A) or no shock (B) on male fertility. Closed bars represent FCB and open bars represent FSB populations. If a female mated to a given male produced at least one egg that hatched, the male was considered to be fertile. (A) Selection and period had significant effect on male fertility. However, selection × period interaction was not significant. (B) Under no-shock treatment, there was no significant difference in male fertility between FSB and FCB males.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836659&req=5

pone.0153629.g004: Effect of cold shock (A) or no shock (B) on male fertility. Closed bars represent FCB and open bars represent FSB populations. If a female mated to a given male produced at least one egg that hatched, the male was considered to be fertile. (A) Selection and period had significant effect on male fertility. However, selection × period interaction was not significant. (B) Under no-shock treatment, there was no significant difference in male fertility between FSB and FCB males.
Mentions: We found a significant effect of selection and period on male fertility. FSB males were significantly more fertile (~8.5%) than FCB males (Table 2B, Fig 4A). Multiple comparisons employing Tukey’s HSD indicated that male fertility increased with increase in the time of recovery post cold shock (Fig 4A). When females were mated to males (FSB and FCB) that had recovered for different periods from cold shock, we found that fewer females mated to the males that had recovered for four hours post cold shock laid fertile eggs compared to females mated to males that had recovered for 12 or 30 hours. However, none of interactions were significant.

Bottom Line: In Drosophila melanogaster the fitness of males depends on a broad array of reproductive traits classified as pre- and post-copulatory traits.Exposure to cold stress, can reduce sperm number, male mating ability and courtship behavior.Additionally, improved performances under stressful conditions need not necessarily trade-off with performance under benign conditions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Indian Institute of Science Education and Research Mohali, Knowledge City, Sector 81, SAS Nagar, PO Manauli, Punjab, 140306, India.

ABSTRACT

Background: In Drosophila melanogaster the fitness of males depends on a broad array of reproductive traits classified as pre- and post-copulatory traits. Exposure to cold stress, can reduce sperm number, male mating ability and courtship behavior. Therefore, it is expected that the adaptation to cold stress will involve changes in pre- and post-copulatory traits. Such evolution of reproductive traits in response to cold stress is not well studied.

Methods: We selected replicate populations of D. melanogaster for resistance to cold shock. Over 37-46 generations of selection, we investigated pre- and post-copulatory traits such as mating latency, copulation duration, mating frequency, male fertility, fitness (progeny production) and sperm competitive ability in male flies subjected to cold shock and those not subjected to cold shock.

Results: We found that post cold shock, the males from the selected populations had a significantly lower mating latency along with, higher mating frequency, fertility, sperm competitive ability and number of progeny relative to the control populations.

Conclusion: While most studies of experimental evolution of cold stress resistance have documented the evolution of survivorship in response to selection, our study clearly shows that adaptation to cold stress involves rapid changes in the pre- and post-copulatory traits. Additionally, improved performances under stressful conditions need not necessarily trade-off with performance under benign conditions.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus