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Age-Related Changes of Plasma Bile Acid Concentrations in Healthy Adults--Results from the Cross-Sectional KarMeN Study.

Frommherz L, Bub A, Hummel E, Rist MJ, Roth A, Watzl B, Kulling SE - PLoS ONE (2016)

Bottom Line: No associations were found for LDL and the amount of fat intake (based on the percentage of energy intake from dietary fat as well as total fat intake).Additional associations regarding body fat content, HDL and triglycerides were found for some secondary BA plasma concentrations.We conclude that age and sex are associated with the fasting plasma concentrations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Safety and Quality of Fruit and Vegetables, Max Rubner-Institut, Federal Research Institute of Nutrition and Food, Karlsruhe, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Bile acids (BA) play an important role in lipid metabolism. They facilitate intestinal lipid absorption, and BA synthesis is the main catabolic pathway for cholesterol. The objective of this study was to investigate associations of age, sex, diet (fat intake) and parameters of lipid metabolism (triglycerides, LDL, HDL, body fat content) with fasting plasma BA concentration of healthy individuals. Fasting plasma samples from a cross-sectional study were used to determine the concentrations of 14 BA using an LC-MS stable isotope dilution assay. Triglycerides, LDL and HDL were analyzed by standard clinical chemistry methods and body fat content was measured with a DXA instrument. The dietary fat intake of the 24 h period prior to the sampling was assessed on the basis of a 24 h recall. Subsequent statistical data processing was done by means of a median regression model. Results revealed large inter-individual variations. Overall, higher median plasma concentrations of BA were observed in men than in women. Quantile regression showed significant interactions of selected BA with age and sex, affecting primarily chenodeoxycholic acid and its conjugates. No associations were found for LDL and the amount of fat intake (based on the percentage of energy intake from dietary fat as well as total fat intake). Additional associations regarding body fat content, HDL and triglycerides were found for some secondary BA plasma concentrations. We conclude that age and sex are associated with the fasting plasma concentrations. Those associations are significant and need to be considered in studies investigating the role of BA in the human metabolism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Sex- and age-dependency of CDCA and DCA in fasting plasma.Selected plot demonstrating the interaction of sex and age (CDCA), and an equal effect of age in both sexes (DCA) regarding the fasting plasma concentrations. Lines depict the predicted values according to the median regression model for men (blue) and women (pink).
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pone.0153959.g001: Sex- and age-dependency of CDCA and DCA in fasting plasma.Selected plot demonstrating the interaction of sex and age (CDCA), and an equal effect of age in both sexes (DCA) regarding the fasting plasma concentrations. Lines depict the predicted values according to the median regression model for men (blue) and women (pink).

Mentions: No interactions were observed for the plasma concentrations for DCA, GCA, UDCA, GDCA and TDCA (p-values ß4, Table 2). The concentrations of these BA decreased with age (p-values ß1, Table 2) in both sexes. The median concentrations of DCA, GCA and UDCA were significantly different between men and women; this was not true for GDCA and TDCA (p-values ß2, Table 2). We did not find any differences in plasma concentrations of CA, LCA, TUDCA and TLCA between men and women, nor did we observe any association with age. Selected plots from the quantile regression (age and sex) are displayed in Fig 1; plots for the remaining BA are shown in S2 Fig.


Age-Related Changes of Plasma Bile Acid Concentrations in Healthy Adults--Results from the Cross-Sectional KarMeN Study.

Frommherz L, Bub A, Hummel E, Rist MJ, Roth A, Watzl B, Kulling SE - PLoS ONE (2016)

Sex- and age-dependency of CDCA and DCA in fasting plasma.Selected plot demonstrating the interaction of sex and age (CDCA), and an equal effect of age in both sexes (DCA) regarding the fasting plasma concentrations. Lines depict the predicted values according to the median regression model for men (blue) and women (pink).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836658&req=5

pone.0153959.g001: Sex- and age-dependency of CDCA and DCA in fasting plasma.Selected plot demonstrating the interaction of sex and age (CDCA), and an equal effect of age in both sexes (DCA) regarding the fasting plasma concentrations. Lines depict the predicted values according to the median regression model for men (blue) and women (pink).
Mentions: No interactions were observed for the plasma concentrations for DCA, GCA, UDCA, GDCA and TDCA (p-values ß4, Table 2). The concentrations of these BA decreased with age (p-values ß1, Table 2) in both sexes. The median concentrations of DCA, GCA and UDCA were significantly different between men and women; this was not true for GDCA and TDCA (p-values ß2, Table 2). We did not find any differences in plasma concentrations of CA, LCA, TUDCA and TLCA between men and women, nor did we observe any association with age. Selected plots from the quantile regression (age and sex) are displayed in Fig 1; plots for the remaining BA are shown in S2 Fig.

Bottom Line: No associations were found for LDL and the amount of fat intake (based on the percentage of energy intake from dietary fat as well as total fat intake).Additional associations regarding body fat content, HDL and triglycerides were found for some secondary BA plasma concentrations.We conclude that age and sex are associated with the fasting plasma concentrations.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Safety and Quality of Fruit and Vegetables, Max Rubner-Institut, Federal Research Institute of Nutrition and Food, Karlsruhe, Germany.

ABSTRACT
Bile acids (BA) play an important role in lipid metabolism. They facilitate intestinal lipid absorption, and BA synthesis is the main catabolic pathway for cholesterol. The objective of this study was to investigate associations of age, sex, diet (fat intake) and parameters of lipid metabolism (triglycerides, LDL, HDL, body fat content) with fasting plasma BA concentration of healthy individuals. Fasting plasma samples from a cross-sectional study were used to determine the concentrations of 14 BA using an LC-MS stable isotope dilution assay. Triglycerides, LDL and HDL were analyzed by standard clinical chemistry methods and body fat content was measured with a DXA instrument. The dietary fat intake of the 24 h period prior to the sampling was assessed on the basis of a 24 h recall. Subsequent statistical data processing was done by means of a median regression model. Results revealed large inter-individual variations. Overall, higher median plasma concentrations of BA were observed in men than in women. Quantile regression showed significant interactions of selected BA with age and sex, affecting primarily chenodeoxycholic acid and its conjugates. No associations were found for LDL and the amount of fat intake (based on the percentage of energy intake from dietary fat as well as total fat intake). Additional associations regarding body fat content, HDL and triglycerides were found for some secondary BA plasma concentrations. We conclude that age and sex are associated with the fasting plasma concentrations. Those associations are significant and need to be considered in studies investigating the role of BA in the human metabolism.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus