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Nanotechnology in Dental Sciences: Moving towards a Finer Way of Doing Dentistry.

Uskoković V, Bertassoni LE - Materials (Basel) (2010)

Bottom Line: Here, we present a dynamic view of dental tissues, an adoption of which may lead to finer, more effective and minimally invasive reparation approaches.By doing so, we aim at providing insights into some of the breakthroughs relevant to understanding the genesis of dental tissues at the nanostructural level or generating dental materials with nanoscale critical boundaries.We conclude by claiming that dentistry should follow the trend of probing matter at nanoscale that currently dominates both materials and biological sciences in order to improve on the research strategies and clinical techniques that have traditionally rested on mechanistic assumptions.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Nanotechnologies are predicted to revolutionize: (a) the control over materials properties at ultrafine scales; and (b) the sensitivity of tools and devices applied in various scientific and technological fields. In this short review, we argue that dentistry will be no exception to this trend. Here, we present a dynamic view of dental tissues, an adoption of which may lead to finer, more effective and minimally invasive reparation approaches. By doing so, we aim at providing insights into some of the breakthroughs relevant to understanding the genesis of dental tissues at the nanostructural level or generating dental materials with nanoscale critical boundaries. The lineage of the progress of dental science, including the projected path along the presumed nanotechnological direction of research and clinical application is mentioned too. We conclude by claiming that dentistry should follow the trend of probing matter at nanoscale that currently dominates both materials and biological sciences in order to improve on the research strategies and clinical techniques that have traditionally rested on mechanistic assumptions.

No MeSH data available.


Dental Sciences, the shift from macro to nano (modified from http://www.ada.org/ada/about/history/ada_timeline.asp).
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Figure 1: Dental Sciences, the shift from macro to nano (modified from http://www.ada.org/ada/about/history/ada_timeline.asp).

Mentions: Many fields of science have throughout history rapidly made advantage of tools and techniques that allowed for the design of material properties at a finer scale. Many are hopes that nanotechnology will likewise bring tangible benefits to dentistry, from the bench to the clinical level [3]. As described by Saunders [3], the subject of comparing anticipated versus realized in the transition of an emerging technology to the actual practice is not new; however, the pace of application of nanotechnology to dentistry has been less than revolutionary. In Figure 1 we present a timeline showing some of the significant advances in dentistry that illuminated the road for the shift from ‘macro’ to ‘nano’ in dental sciences. It is noticeable that increases in the versatility of scientific knowledge and the ability to control physical processes at a finer resolution naturally led to more information and, henceforth, to more questions. The broader our knowledge, the more amazement arises in face of the natural wonders [4, 5]. The same could certainly be said for the field of dentistry. The historic progress in this area naturally goes hand-in-hand with many new questions and challenges that provide opportunities for improvement.


Nanotechnology in Dental Sciences: Moving towards a Finer Way of Doing Dentistry.

Uskoković V, Bertassoni LE - Materials (Basel) (2010)

Dental Sciences, the shift from macro to nano (modified from http://www.ada.org/ada/about/history/ada_timeline.asp).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836616&req=5

Figure 1: Dental Sciences, the shift from macro to nano (modified from http://www.ada.org/ada/about/history/ada_timeline.asp).
Mentions: Many fields of science have throughout history rapidly made advantage of tools and techniques that allowed for the design of material properties at a finer scale. Many are hopes that nanotechnology will likewise bring tangible benefits to dentistry, from the bench to the clinical level [3]. As described by Saunders [3], the subject of comparing anticipated versus realized in the transition of an emerging technology to the actual practice is not new; however, the pace of application of nanotechnology to dentistry has been less than revolutionary. In Figure 1 we present a timeline showing some of the significant advances in dentistry that illuminated the road for the shift from ‘macro’ to ‘nano’ in dental sciences. It is noticeable that increases in the versatility of scientific knowledge and the ability to control physical processes at a finer resolution naturally led to more information and, henceforth, to more questions. The broader our knowledge, the more amazement arises in face of the natural wonders [4, 5]. The same could certainly be said for the field of dentistry. The historic progress in this area naturally goes hand-in-hand with many new questions and challenges that provide opportunities for improvement.

Bottom Line: Here, we present a dynamic view of dental tissues, an adoption of which may lead to finer, more effective and minimally invasive reparation approaches.By doing so, we aim at providing insights into some of the breakthroughs relevant to understanding the genesis of dental tissues at the nanostructural level or generating dental materials with nanoscale critical boundaries.We conclude by claiming that dentistry should follow the trend of probing matter at nanoscale that currently dominates both materials and biological sciences in order to improve on the research strategies and clinical techniques that have traditionally rested on mechanistic assumptions.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Biomaterials and Bioengineering, Department of Preventive and Restorative Dental Sciences, School of Dentistry, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Nanotechnologies are predicted to revolutionize: (a) the control over materials properties at ultrafine scales; and (b) the sensitivity of tools and devices applied in various scientific and technological fields. In this short review, we argue that dentistry will be no exception to this trend. Here, we present a dynamic view of dental tissues, an adoption of which may lead to finer, more effective and minimally invasive reparation approaches. By doing so, we aim at providing insights into some of the breakthroughs relevant to understanding the genesis of dental tissues at the nanostructural level or generating dental materials with nanoscale critical boundaries. The lineage of the progress of dental science, including the projected path along the presumed nanotechnological direction of research and clinical application is mentioned too. We conclude by claiming that dentistry should follow the trend of probing matter at nanoscale that currently dominates both materials and biological sciences in order to improve on the research strategies and clinical techniques that have traditionally rested on mechanistic assumptions.

No MeSH data available.