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An unusual case of false-positive coronary artery calcium score.

Brinkert M, Rodrigues P, Rubens M, Nicol E - Oxf Med Case Reports (2016)

Bottom Line: False-negative results of coronary artery calcium score (CACS) are common due to small calcified lesions being missed using a 3-mm slice thickness, a threshold of 130 Hounsfield units (HU) and a minimum area of 1 mm(2) for defining a calcified plaque.In contrast, false-positive results of CACS, as verified by a lack of coronary artery calcifications in computed tomography coronary angiogram (CTCA), are extremely uncommon.We present a patient with a false-positive coronary calcium score who had normal coronary arteries in CTCA.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology , Royal Brompton Hospital and Harefield NHS Trust , London , UK.

ABSTRACT
False-negative results of coronary artery calcium score (CACS) are common due to small calcified lesions being missed using a 3-mm slice thickness, a threshold of 130 Hounsfield units (HU) and a minimum area of 1 mm(2) for defining a calcified plaque. In contrast, false-positive results of CACS, as verified by a lack of coronary artery calcifications in computed tomography coronary angiogram (CTCA), are extremely uncommon. We present a patient with a false-positive coronary calcium score who had normal coronary arteries in CTCA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a and b) Representative images of the patient's calcium score (white arrow pointing to the calcium detected in the proximal RCA). (c) Volume rendered (VR) model of the patient's heart. (d) Maximum intensity projection of the proximal RCA. (e) Curved multiplanar reformatting (cMPR) image of the RCA. The asterisk marks a significant kink in the proximal RCA (seen clearly in the VR image in c), where the vessel goes somewhat out of plane (hence, the appearance on the cMPR in e).
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OMW021F1: (a and b) Representative images of the patient's calcium score (white arrow pointing to the calcium detected in the proximal RCA). (c) Volume rendered (VR) model of the patient's heart. (d) Maximum intensity projection of the proximal RCA. (e) Curved multiplanar reformatting (cMPR) image of the RCA. The asterisk marks a significant kink in the proximal RCA (seen clearly in the VR image in c), where the vessel goes somewhat out of plane (hence, the appearance on the cMPR in e).

Mentions: The patient underwent a coronary calcium score and an adaptive sequential CTCA. Curved multiplanar reconstructions were used to assess the coronary arteries. The calcium (Agatston) score was 22 in total (Fig. 1a and b): 2 for the left anterior descending (LAD) artery and 20 for the right coronary artery (RCA), placing the patient in the 25th–50th percentile for gender and age [3].Figure 1:


An unusual case of false-positive coronary artery calcium score.

Brinkert M, Rodrigues P, Rubens M, Nicol E - Oxf Med Case Reports (2016)

(a and b) Representative images of the patient's calcium score (white arrow pointing to the calcium detected in the proximal RCA). (c) Volume rendered (VR) model of the patient's heart. (d) Maximum intensity projection of the proximal RCA. (e) Curved multiplanar reformatting (cMPR) image of the RCA. The asterisk marks a significant kink in the proximal RCA (seen clearly in the VR image in c), where the vessel goes somewhat out of plane (hence, the appearance on the cMPR in e).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836602&req=5

OMW021F1: (a and b) Representative images of the patient's calcium score (white arrow pointing to the calcium detected in the proximal RCA). (c) Volume rendered (VR) model of the patient's heart. (d) Maximum intensity projection of the proximal RCA. (e) Curved multiplanar reformatting (cMPR) image of the RCA. The asterisk marks a significant kink in the proximal RCA (seen clearly in the VR image in c), where the vessel goes somewhat out of plane (hence, the appearance on the cMPR in e).
Mentions: The patient underwent a coronary calcium score and an adaptive sequential CTCA. Curved multiplanar reconstructions were used to assess the coronary arteries. The calcium (Agatston) score was 22 in total (Fig. 1a and b): 2 for the left anterior descending (LAD) artery and 20 for the right coronary artery (RCA), placing the patient in the 25th–50th percentile for gender and age [3].Figure 1:

Bottom Line: False-negative results of coronary artery calcium score (CACS) are common due to small calcified lesions being missed using a 3-mm slice thickness, a threshold of 130 Hounsfield units (HU) and a minimum area of 1 mm(2) for defining a calcified plaque.In contrast, false-positive results of CACS, as verified by a lack of coronary artery calcifications in computed tomography coronary angiogram (CTCA), are extremely uncommon.We present a patient with a false-positive coronary calcium score who had normal coronary arteries in CTCA.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology , Royal Brompton Hospital and Harefield NHS Trust , London , UK.

ABSTRACT
False-negative results of coronary artery calcium score (CACS) are common due to small calcified lesions being missed using a 3-mm slice thickness, a threshold of 130 Hounsfield units (HU) and a minimum area of 1 mm(2) for defining a calcified plaque. In contrast, false-positive results of CACS, as verified by a lack of coronary artery calcifications in computed tomography coronary angiogram (CTCA), are extremely uncommon. We present a patient with a false-positive coronary calcium score who had normal coronary arteries in CTCA.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus