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The Effect of Training Intensity on VO2max in Young Healthy Adults: A Meta-Regression and Meta-Analysis.

Scribbans TD, Vecsey S, Hankinson PB, Foster WS, Gurd BJ - Int J Exerc Sci (2016)

Bottom Line: These studies were also divided into 3 tertiles based on intensity (tertile 1: ~60-70%; 2: ~80-92.5%; 3: ~100-250%VO2max), for comparison using separate meta-analyses.The fixed and random effects meta-regression models examining training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max and total training volume was non-significant (Q4=1.36; p=0.85; R(2)=0.05).There was no significant difference between tertiles in mean change in VO2max (tertile 1:+0.29±0.15 l/min, ES (effect size) =0.77; 2:+0.26±0.10 l/min, ES=0.68; 3:+0.35±0.17 l/min, ES=0.80), despite significant (p<0.05) reductions in session dose and total training volume as training intensity increased.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Exercise training at a variety of intensities increases maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), the strongest predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The purpose of the present study was to perform a systematic review, meta-regression and meta-analysis of available literature to determine if a dose-response relationship exists between exercise intensity and training-induced increases in VO2max in young healthy adults. Twenty-eight studies involving human participants (Mean age: 23±1 yr; Mean VO2max: 3.4±0.8 l·min(-1)) were included in the meta-regression with exercise training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max, and total training volume used as covariates. These studies were also divided into 3 tertiles based on intensity (tertile 1: ~60-70%; 2: ~80-92.5%; 3: ~100-250%VO2max), for comparison using separate meta-analyses. The fixed and random effects meta-regression models examining training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max and total training volume was non-significant (Q4=1.36; p=0.85; R(2)=0.05). There was no significant difference between tertiles in mean change in VO2max (tertile 1:+0.29±0.15 l/min, ES (effect size) =0.77; 2:+0.26±0.10 l/min, ES=0.68; 3:+0.35±0.17 l/min, ES=0.80), despite significant (p<0.05) reductions in session dose and total training volume as training intensity increased. These data suggest that exercise training intensity has no effect on the magnitude of training-induced increases in maximal oxygen uptake in young healthy human participants, but similar adaptations can be achieved in low training doses at higher exercise intensities than higher training doses of lower intensity (endurance training).

No MeSH data available.


Forest plot of mean difference in absolute oxygen consumption (VO2max) with 95% credibility intervals (CI’s) for each study (filled circles) and the total for all studies (open circle) included in the meta-regression and -analysis. Training intensity (% of VO2max), pooled standard deviation (SDP), and Cohen’s effect sizes (Cohen’s d) are also shown for each individual, and all studies included. Interventions are organized by ascending order of training intensity with studies assigned to tertile one, two and three, represented by light, medium, and dark grey, respectively. Note: l, liters; min, minutes.
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f3-ijes_09_02_230: Forest plot of mean difference in absolute oxygen consumption (VO2max) with 95% credibility intervals (CI’s) for each study (filled circles) and the total for all studies (open circle) included in the meta-regression and -analysis. Training intensity (% of VO2max), pooled standard deviation (SDP), and Cohen’s effect sizes (Cohen’s d) are also shown for each individual, and all studies included. Interventions are organized by ascending order of training intensity with studies assigned to tertile one, two and three, represented by light, medium, and dark grey, respectively. Note: l, liters; min, minutes.

Mentions: Following training, VO2max increased (p<0.05) in all of studies except for one (29) with Cohen’s d effects sizes ranging between −0.53 and 1.37. The weighted mean change in VO2max (l/min), 95% credibility intervals, small sample size corrected Cohen’s d effect sizes, pooled SD, and training intensity (% of VO2max) for each study are presented in Figure 3. The weighted mean Cohen’s d effect size was 0.73 (95% CI’s 1.34–0.11) and homogeneous (Q39 = 11.47; p > 0.01). The homogeneity of ES (Q ≤ N - 1) resulted in the random effects variance component (vθ) being calculated as zero, resulting in equivalent inverse variance weights for both the fixed and random effects models (i.e. results from both regression models were equivalent). The random effects meta-regression model (Table 5) examining training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max, and total training volume was non-significant (Q3 = 1.36; p=0.85; R2 = 0.05; ES=0.76).


The Effect of Training Intensity on VO2max in Young Healthy Adults: A Meta-Regression and Meta-Analysis.

Scribbans TD, Vecsey S, Hankinson PB, Foster WS, Gurd BJ - Int J Exerc Sci (2016)

Forest plot of mean difference in absolute oxygen consumption (VO2max) with 95% credibility intervals (CI’s) for each study (filled circles) and the total for all studies (open circle) included in the meta-regression and -analysis. Training intensity (% of VO2max), pooled standard deviation (SDP), and Cohen’s effect sizes (Cohen’s d) are also shown for each individual, and all studies included. Interventions are organized by ascending order of training intensity with studies assigned to tertile one, two and three, represented by light, medium, and dark grey, respectively. Note: l, liters; min, minutes.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836566&req=5

f3-ijes_09_02_230: Forest plot of mean difference in absolute oxygen consumption (VO2max) with 95% credibility intervals (CI’s) for each study (filled circles) and the total for all studies (open circle) included in the meta-regression and -analysis. Training intensity (% of VO2max), pooled standard deviation (SDP), and Cohen’s effect sizes (Cohen’s d) are also shown for each individual, and all studies included. Interventions are organized by ascending order of training intensity with studies assigned to tertile one, two and three, represented by light, medium, and dark grey, respectively. Note: l, liters; min, minutes.
Mentions: Following training, VO2max increased (p<0.05) in all of studies except for one (29) with Cohen’s d effects sizes ranging between −0.53 and 1.37. The weighted mean change in VO2max (l/min), 95% credibility intervals, small sample size corrected Cohen’s d effect sizes, pooled SD, and training intensity (% of VO2max) for each study are presented in Figure 3. The weighted mean Cohen’s d effect size was 0.73 (95% CI’s 1.34–0.11) and homogeneous (Q39 = 11.47; p > 0.01). The homogeneity of ES (Q ≤ N - 1) resulted in the random effects variance component (vθ) being calculated as zero, resulting in equivalent inverse variance weights for both the fixed and random effects models (i.e. results from both regression models were equivalent). The random effects meta-regression model (Table 5) examining training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max, and total training volume was non-significant (Q3 = 1.36; p=0.85; R2 = 0.05; ES=0.76).

Bottom Line: These studies were also divided into 3 tertiles based on intensity (tertile 1: ~60-70%; 2: ~80-92.5%; 3: ~100-250%VO2max), for comparison using separate meta-analyses.The fixed and random effects meta-regression models examining training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max and total training volume was non-significant (Q4=1.36; p=0.85; R(2)=0.05).There was no significant difference between tertiles in mean change in VO2max (tertile 1:+0.29±0.15 l/min, ES (effect size) =0.77; 2:+0.26±0.10 l/min, ES=0.68; 3:+0.35±0.17 l/min, ES=0.80), despite significant (p<0.05) reductions in session dose and total training volume as training intensity increased.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Exercise training at a variety of intensities increases maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), the strongest predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The purpose of the present study was to perform a systematic review, meta-regression and meta-analysis of available literature to determine if a dose-response relationship exists between exercise intensity and training-induced increases in VO2max in young healthy adults. Twenty-eight studies involving human participants (Mean age: 23±1 yr; Mean VO2max: 3.4±0.8 l·min(-1)) were included in the meta-regression with exercise training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max, and total training volume used as covariates. These studies were also divided into 3 tertiles based on intensity (tertile 1: ~60-70%; 2: ~80-92.5%; 3: ~100-250%VO2max), for comparison using separate meta-analyses. The fixed and random effects meta-regression models examining training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max and total training volume was non-significant (Q4=1.36; p=0.85; R(2)=0.05). There was no significant difference between tertiles in mean change in VO2max (tertile 1:+0.29±0.15 l/min, ES (effect size) =0.77; 2:+0.26±0.10 l/min, ES=0.68; 3:+0.35±0.17 l/min, ES=0.80), despite significant (p<0.05) reductions in session dose and total training volume as training intensity increased. These data suggest that exercise training intensity has no effect on the magnitude of training-induced increases in maximal oxygen uptake in young healthy human participants, but similar adaptations can be achieved in low training doses at higher exercise intensities than higher training doses of lower intensity (endurance training).

No MeSH data available.