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The Effect of Training Intensity on VO2max in Young Healthy Adults: A Meta-Regression and Meta-Analysis.

Scribbans TD, Vecsey S, Hankinson PB, Foster WS, Gurd BJ - Int J Exerc Sci (2016)

Bottom Line: These studies were also divided into 3 tertiles based on intensity (tertile 1: ~60-70%; 2: ~80-92.5%; 3: ~100-250%VO2max), for comparison using separate meta-analyses.The fixed and random effects meta-regression models examining training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max and total training volume was non-significant (Q4=1.36; p=0.85; R(2)=0.05).There was no significant difference between tertiles in mean change in VO2max (tertile 1:+0.29±0.15 l/min, ES (effect size) =0.77; 2:+0.26±0.10 l/min, ES=0.68; 3:+0.35±0.17 l/min, ES=0.80), despite significant (p<0.05) reductions in session dose and total training volume as training intensity increased.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Exercise training at a variety of intensities increases maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), the strongest predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The purpose of the present study was to perform a systematic review, meta-regression and meta-analysis of available literature to determine if a dose-response relationship exists between exercise intensity and training-induced increases in VO2max in young healthy adults. Twenty-eight studies involving human participants (Mean age: 23±1 yr; Mean VO2max: 3.4±0.8 l·min(-1)) were included in the meta-regression with exercise training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max, and total training volume used as covariates. These studies were also divided into 3 tertiles based on intensity (tertile 1: ~60-70%; 2: ~80-92.5%; 3: ~100-250%VO2max), for comparison using separate meta-analyses. The fixed and random effects meta-regression models examining training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max and total training volume was non-significant (Q4=1.36; p=0.85; R(2)=0.05). There was no significant difference between tertiles in mean change in VO2max (tertile 1:+0.29±0.15 l/min, ES (effect size) =0.77; 2:+0.26±0.10 l/min, ES=0.68; 3:+0.35±0.17 l/min, ES=0.80), despite significant (p<0.05) reductions in session dose and total training volume as training intensity increased. These data suggest that exercise training intensity has no effect on the magnitude of training-induced increases in maximal oxygen uptake in young healthy human participants, but similar adaptations can be achieved in low training doses at higher exercise intensities than higher training doses of lower intensity (endurance training).

No MeSH data available.


Study Selection Flow Diagram. Flow chart demonstrating the process of study selection. Studies included in quantitative analysis refers to the number of publications from which study groups (n=40) were extracted.
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f1-ijes_09_02_230: Study Selection Flow Diagram. Flow chart demonstrating the process of study selection. Studies included in quantitative analysis refers to the number of publications from which study groups (n=40) were extracted.

Mentions: Following a preliminary review of titles and abstracts of the initial articles identified using the search terms outlined above, 98 articles were further evaluated utilizing our full inclusion/exclusion criteria. Based on this criteria, a further 70 articles were excluded resulting in a total of 40 study groups from 28 articles being included in the meta-regression/analyses (Fig. 1). These 28 articles were evaluated for methodological quality (Table 1) using the modified Physiotherapy Evidence Base Database (PEDro) scale (56). Characteristics of each study are outlined in Table 2.


The Effect of Training Intensity on VO2max in Young Healthy Adults: A Meta-Regression and Meta-Analysis.

Scribbans TD, Vecsey S, Hankinson PB, Foster WS, Gurd BJ - Int J Exerc Sci (2016)

Study Selection Flow Diagram. Flow chart demonstrating the process of study selection. Studies included in quantitative analysis refers to the number of publications from which study groups (n=40) were extracted.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836566&req=5

f1-ijes_09_02_230: Study Selection Flow Diagram. Flow chart demonstrating the process of study selection. Studies included in quantitative analysis refers to the number of publications from which study groups (n=40) were extracted.
Mentions: Following a preliminary review of titles and abstracts of the initial articles identified using the search terms outlined above, 98 articles were further evaluated utilizing our full inclusion/exclusion criteria. Based on this criteria, a further 70 articles were excluded resulting in a total of 40 study groups from 28 articles being included in the meta-regression/analyses (Fig. 1). These 28 articles were evaluated for methodological quality (Table 1) using the modified Physiotherapy Evidence Base Database (PEDro) scale (56). Characteristics of each study are outlined in Table 2.

Bottom Line: These studies were also divided into 3 tertiles based on intensity (tertile 1: ~60-70%; 2: ~80-92.5%; 3: ~100-250%VO2max), for comparison using separate meta-analyses.The fixed and random effects meta-regression models examining training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max and total training volume was non-significant (Q4=1.36; p=0.85; R(2)=0.05).There was no significant difference between tertiles in mean change in VO2max (tertile 1:+0.29±0.15 l/min, ES (effect size) =0.77; 2:+0.26±0.10 l/min, ES=0.68; 3:+0.35±0.17 l/min, ES=0.80), despite significant (p<0.05) reductions in session dose and total training volume as training intensity increased.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Exercise training at a variety of intensities increases maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), the strongest predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality. The purpose of the present study was to perform a systematic review, meta-regression and meta-analysis of available literature to determine if a dose-response relationship exists between exercise intensity and training-induced increases in VO2max in young healthy adults. Twenty-eight studies involving human participants (Mean age: 23±1 yr; Mean VO2max: 3.4±0.8 l·min(-1)) were included in the meta-regression with exercise training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max, and total training volume used as covariates. These studies were also divided into 3 tertiles based on intensity (tertile 1: ~60-70%; 2: ~80-92.5%; 3: ~100-250%VO2max), for comparison using separate meta-analyses. The fixed and random effects meta-regression models examining training intensity, session dose, baseline VO2max and total training volume was non-significant (Q4=1.36; p=0.85; R(2)=0.05). There was no significant difference between tertiles in mean change in VO2max (tertile 1:+0.29±0.15 l/min, ES (effect size) =0.77; 2:+0.26±0.10 l/min, ES=0.68; 3:+0.35±0.17 l/min, ES=0.80), despite significant (p<0.05) reductions in session dose and total training volume as training intensity increased. These data suggest that exercise training intensity has no effect on the magnitude of training-induced increases in maximal oxygen uptake in young healthy human participants, but similar adaptations can be achieved in low training doses at higher exercise intensities than higher training doses of lower intensity (endurance training).

No MeSH data available.