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Extracellular vesicles of the blood-brain barrier.

András IE, Toborek M - Tissue Barriers (2015)

Bottom Line: While there are a lot of reports on ECV/exosomes derived from a variety of cell types, there is limited information on ECV/exosomes originated from brain microvascular endothelial cells forming the blood-brain barrier (BBB).In this review, we summarize the literature data on brain endothelial ECV/exosomes and present our own data on BBB-derived ECV and their possible involvement in the brain's Aβ pathology.We propose that ECV/exosome release from brain endothelial cells associated with Aβ affects different cells of the neurovascular unit and may be an important contributor to the Aβ deposition in the central nervous system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; University of Miami School of Medicine ; Miami, FL USA.

ABSTRACT
Extracellular vesicles (ECV), like exosomes, gained recently a lot of attention as potentially playing a significant role in neurodegenerative diseases, particularly in Aβ pathology. While there are a lot of reports on ECV/exosomes derived from a variety of cell types, there is limited information on ECV/exosomes originated from brain microvascular endothelial cells forming the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In this review, we summarize the literature data on brain endothelial ECV/exosomes and present our own data on BBB-derived ECV and their possible involvement in the brain's Aβ pathology. We propose that ECV/exosome release from brain endothelial cells associated with Aβ affects different cells of the neurovascular unit and may be an important contributor to the Aβ deposition in the central nervous system.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Exogenous Aβ (1-40) HiLyte in HBMEC-derived ECV. HBMEC were exposed to 100 nM Aβ (1-40) HiLyte for 48 h, followed by ECV isolation from cell culture media. Aβ (1-40) HiLyte (green fluorescence) in the isolated ECV was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. The images show the green fluorescent Aβ (1-40) HiLyte associated with ECV of different sizes. Scale bar: 20 μm.
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f0003: Exogenous Aβ (1-40) HiLyte in HBMEC-derived ECV. HBMEC were exposed to 100 nM Aβ (1-40) HiLyte for 48 h, followed by ECV isolation from cell culture media. Aβ (1-40) HiLyte (green fluorescence) in the isolated ECV was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. The images show the green fluorescent Aβ (1-40) HiLyte associated with ECV of different sizes. Scale bar: 20 μm.

Mentions: Because ECV/exosomes from other cell types were reported to be important players in the brain's Aβ pathology,18,19,21,22 we hypothesized that BBB-derived ECV could also contribute to this pathology. HBMEC were exposed to fluorescently labeled Aβ, specifically to 100 nM Aβ (1-40) HiLyte, for 48 h. ECV from the cell culture media were isolated using ExoQuickTC. An interesting phenomenon was observed as Aβ (1-40) HiLyte was associated with ECV of very different sizes. Surprisingly, not only smaller but also larger vesicles contained Aβ (1-40) HiLyte cargo as indicated by green fluorescence under fluorescence microscopy (Fig. 3). This suggests that BBB-derived different ECV, and not only exosomes, may have a role in distributing Aβ within the central nervous system.Figure 3.


Extracellular vesicles of the blood-brain barrier.

András IE, Toborek M - Tissue Barriers (2015)

Exogenous Aβ (1-40) HiLyte in HBMEC-derived ECV. HBMEC were exposed to 100 nM Aβ (1-40) HiLyte for 48 h, followed by ECV isolation from cell culture media. Aβ (1-40) HiLyte (green fluorescence) in the isolated ECV was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. The images show the green fluorescent Aβ (1-40) HiLyte associated with ECV of different sizes. Scale bar: 20 μm.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836554&req=5

f0003: Exogenous Aβ (1-40) HiLyte in HBMEC-derived ECV. HBMEC were exposed to 100 nM Aβ (1-40) HiLyte for 48 h, followed by ECV isolation from cell culture media. Aβ (1-40) HiLyte (green fluorescence) in the isolated ECV was visualized by fluorescence microscopy. The images show the green fluorescent Aβ (1-40) HiLyte associated with ECV of different sizes. Scale bar: 20 μm.
Mentions: Because ECV/exosomes from other cell types were reported to be important players in the brain's Aβ pathology,18,19,21,22 we hypothesized that BBB-derived ECV could also contribute to this pathology. HBMEC were exposed to fluorescently labeled Aβ, specifically to 100 nM Aβ (1-40) HiLyte, for 48 h. ECV from the cell culture media were isolated using ExoQuickTC. An interesting phenomenon was observed as Aβ (1-40) HiLyte was associated with ECV of very different sizes. Surprisingly, not only smaller but also larger vesicles contained Aβ (1-40) HiLyte cargo as indicated by green fluorescence under fluorescence microscopy (Fig. 3). This suggests that BBB-derived different ECV, and not only exosomes, may have a role in distributing Aβ within the central nervous system.Figure 3.

Bottom Line: While there are a lot of reports on ECV/exosomes derived from a variety of cell types, there is limited information on ECV/exosomes originated from brain microvascular endothelial cells forming the blood-brain barrier (BBB).In this review, we summarize the literature data on brain endothelial ECV/exosomes and present our own data on BBB-derived ECV and their possible involvement in the brain's Aβ pathology.We propose that ECV/exosome release from brain endothelial cells associated with Aβ affects different cells of the neurovascular unit and may be an important contributor to the Aβ deposition in the central nervous system.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology; University of Miami School of Medicine ; Miami, FL USA.

ABSTRACT
Extracellular vesicles (ECV), like exosomes, gained recently a lot of attention as potentially playing a significant role in neurodegenerative diseases, particularly in Aβ pathology. While there are a lot of reports on ECV/exosomes derived from a variety of cell types, there is limited information on ECV/exosomes originated from brain microvascular endothelial cells forming the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In this review, we summarize the literature data on brain endothelial ECV/exosomes and present our own data on BBB-derived ECV and their possible involvement in the brain's Aβ pathology. We propose that ECV/exosome release from brain endothelial cells associated with Aβ affects different cells of the neurovascular unit and may be an important contributor to the Aβ deposition in the central nervous system.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus