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Universal lineshapes at the crossover between weak and strong critical coupling in Fano-resonant coupled oscillators.

Zanotto S, Tredicucci A - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: In this article we discuss a model describing key features concerning the lineshapes and the coherent absorption conditions in Fano-resonant dissipative coupled oscillators.The model treats on the same footing the weak and strong coupling regimes, and includes the critical coupling concept, which is of great relevance in numerous applications; in addition, the role of asymmetry is thoroughly analyzed.Due to the wide generality of the model, which can be adapted to various frameworks like nanophotonics, plasmonics, and optomechanics, we envisage that the analytical formulas presented here will be crucial to effectively design devices and to interpret experimental results.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Istituto Nazionale di Ottica - CNR, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI), Italy.

ABSTRACT
In this article we discuss a model describing key features concerning the lineshapes and the coherent absorption conditions in Fano-resonant dissipative coupled oscillators. The model treats on the same footing the weak and strong coupling regimes, and includes the critical coupling concept, which is of great relevance in numerous applications; in addition, the role of asymmetry is thoroughly analyzed. Due to the wide generality of the model, which can be adapted to various frameworks like nanophotonics, plasmonics, and optomechanics, we envisage that the analytical formulas presented here will be crucial to effectively design devices and to interpret experimental results.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Panel (a): sketch of the coupled oscillator model analyzed in the article. Panels (b,c): spectral lineshapes of the weakly (b) and strongly coupled (c) system. The transmittance lineshape can be tuned through a parameter (r, see text), and is inherited from the weakly to the strongly coupled case. The S-matrix determinant, instead, is given by a universal function, independent of the trasmittance (and reflectance) lineshapes. Parameter values are γr = γ12, ωc = ω12 = 50γr, γnr = 0. In case (b) the ratio Ω/γr equals to 0.3, while in case (c) it equals to 2.7.
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f1: Panel (a): sketch of the coupled oscillator model analyzed in the article. Panels (b,c): spectral lineshapes of the weakly (b) and strongly coupled (c) system. The transmittance lineshape can be tuned through a parameter (r, see text), and is inherited from the weakly to the strongly coupled case. The S-matrix determinant, instead, is given by a universal function, independent of the trasmittance (and reflectance) lineshapes. Parameter values are γr = γ12, ωc = ω12 = 50γr, γnr = 0. In case (b) the ratio Ω/γr equals to 0.3, while in case (c) it equals to 2.7.

Mentions: The model under consideration is schematized in Fig. 1(a). A resonant cavity at frequency ωc is coupled to a second resonant degree of freedom, here represented as a spring-mass resonator at ω12, through a coupling coefficient Ω. From now on, the second oscillator will be referred to as “matter” resonator, since a prototypical situation would be that of a two-level system (atom, exciton) treated under the semiclassical approximation. However, another important situation could be that of a subradiant (“dark”) mode in a plasmonic system, and the notation would assume a different meaning. The cavity resonator radiates into, and is excited from, two radiative scattering channels through two ports, with couplings d1,2 and κ1,2. γ12 describes an internal loss mechanism of the matter resonator, while γnr describes a non-radiative and non-resonant cavity loss mechanism. In the photonic framework, γnr may represent losses such as roughness scattering or dissipation in a metal component.


Universal lineshapes at the crossover between weak and strong critical coupling in Fano-resonant coupled oscillators.

Zanotto S, Tredicucci A - Sci Rep (2016)

Panel (a): sketch of the coupled oscillator model analyzed in the article. Panels (b,c): spectral lineshapes of the weakly (b) and strongly coupled (c) system. The transmittance lineshape can be tuned through a parameter (r, see text), and is inherited from the weakly to the strongly coupled case. The S-matrix determinant, instead, is given by a universal function, independent of the trasmittance (and reflectance) lineshapes. Parameter values are γr = γ12, ωc = ω12 = 50γr, γnr = 0. In case (b) the ratio Ω/γr equals to 0.3, while in case (c) it equals to 2.7.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836300&req=5

f1: Panel (a): sketch of the coupled oscillator model analyzed in the article. Panels (b,c): spectral lineshapes of the weakly (b) and strongly coupled (c) system. The transmittance lineshape can be tuned through a parameter (r, see text), and is inherited from the weakly to the strongly coupled case. The S-matrix determinant, instead, is given by a universal function, independent of the trasmittance (and reflectance) lineshapes. Parameter values are γr = γ12, ωc = ω12 = 50γr, γnr = 0. In case (b) the ratio Ω/γr equals to 0.3, while in case (c) it equals to 2.7.
Mentions: The model under consideration is schematized in Fig. 1(a). A resonant cavity at frequency ωc is coupled to a second resonant degree of freedom, here represented as a spring-mass resonator at ω12, through a coupling coefficient Ω. From now on, the second oscillator will be referred to as “matter” resonator, since a prototypical situation would be that of a two-level system (atom, exciton) treated under the semiclassical approximation. However, another important situation could be that of a subradiant (“dark”) mode in a plasmonic system, and the notation would assume a different meaning. The cavity resonator radiates into, and is excited from, two radiative scattering channels through two ports, with couplings d1,2 and κ1,2. γ12 describes an internal loss mechanism of the matter resonator, while γnr describes a non-radiative and non-resonant cavity loss mechanism. In the photonic framework, γnr may represent losses such as roughness scattering or dissipation in a metal component.

Bottom Line: In this article we discuss a model describing key features concerning the lineshapes and the coherent absorption conditions in Fano-resonant dissipative coupled oscillators.The model treats on the same footing the weak and strong coupling regimes, and includes the critical coupling concept, which is of great relevance in numerous applications; in addition, the role of asymmetry is thoroughly analyzed.Due to the wide generality of the model, which can be adapted to various frameworks like nanophotonics, plasmonics, and optomechanics, we envisage that the analytical formulas presented here will be crucial to effectively design devices and to interpret experimental results.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Istituto Nazionale di Ottica - CNR, Via Nello Carrara 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (FI), Italy.

ABSTRACT
In this article we discuss a model describing key features concerning the lineshapes and the coherent absorption conditions in Fano-resonant dissipative coupled oscillators. The model treats on the same footing the weak and strong coupling regimes, and includes the critical coupling concept, which is of great relevance in numerous applications; in addition, the role of asymmetry is thoroughly analyzed. Due to the wide generality of the model, which can be adapted to various frameworks like nanophotonics, plasmonics, and optomechanics, we envisage that the analytical formulas presented here will be crucial to effectively design devices and to interpret experimental results.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus