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Identification of (poly)phenol treatments that modulate the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by human lymphocytes.

Ford CT, Richardson S, McArdle F, Lotito SB, Crozier A, McArdle A, Jackson MJ - Br. J. Nutr. (2016)

Bottom Line: We compared thirty-one (poly)phenols and six (poly)phenol mixtures for effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine release by Jurkat T-lymphocytes.A number of (poly)phenols significantly altered cytokine release from Jurkat cells (P<0·05), but H2O2 generation did not correlate with cytokine release.These results suggest that (poly)phenols derived from onions, turmeric, red grapes, green tea and açai berries may help reduce the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in people at risk of chronic inflammation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1Department of Musculoskeletal Biology,Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease,University of Liverpool,Liverpool L7 8TX,UK.

ABSTRACT
Diets rich in fruits and vegetables (FV), which contain (poly)phenols, protect against age-related inflammation and chronic diseases. T-lymphocytes contribute to systemic cytokine production and are modulated by FV intake. Little is known about the relative potency of different (poly)phenols in modulating cytokine release by lymphocytes. We compared thirty-one (poly)phenols and six (poly)phenol mixtures for effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine release by Jurkat T-lymphocytes. Test compounds were incubated with Jurkat cells for 48 h at 1 and 30 µm, with or without phorbol ester treatment at 24 h to induce cytokine release. Three test compounds that reduced cytokine release were further incubated with primary lymphocytes at 0·2 and 1 µm for 24 h, with lipopolysaccharide added at 5 h. Cytokine release was measured, and generation of H2O2 by test compounds was determined to assess any potential correlations with cytokine release. A number of (poly)phenols significantly altered cytokine release from Jurkat cells (P<0·05), but H2O2 generation did not correlate with cytokine release. Resveratrol, isorhamnetin, curcumin, vanillic acid and specific (poly)phenol mixtures reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine release from T-lymphocytes, and there was evidence for interaction between (poly)phenols to further modulate cytokine release. The release of interferon-γ induced protein 10 by primary lymphocytes was significantly reduced following treatment with 1 µm isorhamnetin (P<0·05). These results suggest that (poly)phenols derived from onions, turmeric, red grapes, green tea and açai berries may help reduce the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in people at risk of chronic inflammation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Heat map showing the effects of polyphenols on cytokine release and growth byJurkat CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Compounds are ordered by molecular weight fromthe lowest weight (top) to the highest weight (bottom). Data are presented aspercentage differences from matched vehicle controls following 48 h of treatment.Treatment and control experiments were performed with or without 25 ng/ml phorbol12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and 5 µg/ml phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation at24 h. TNFα could not be measured in the absence of PMA/PHAstimulation. * Mean value was significantly different compared with vehicle controls(P<0·05; one-way ANOVA with Dunnett’s posthoc test). Examples of the data from which these heat maps are derived areprovided in the online Supplementary data to allow an assessment of the variabilityobserved in these studies.
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fig3: Heat map showing the effects of polyphenols on cytokine release and growth byJurkat CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Compounds are ordered by molecular weight fromthe lowest weight (top) to the highest weight (bottom). Data are presented aspercentage differences from matched vehicle controls following 48 h of treatment.Treatment and control experiments were performed with or without 25 ng/ml phorbol12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and 5 µg/ml phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation at24 h. TNFα could not be measured in the absence of PMA/PHAstimulation. * Mean value was significantly different compared with vehicle controls(P<0·05; one-way ANOVA with Dunnett’s posthoc test). Examples of the data from which these heat maps are derived areprovided in the online Supplementary data to allow an assessment of the variabilityobserved in these studies.

Mentions: Treatment with different polyphenols had varied effects on growth and pro-inflammatorycytokine release by Jurkat CD4+ T-lymphocytes (Fig. 3). Three polyphenols – resveratrol, isorhamnetin and curcumin –significantly reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine release at both 1 and 30 µmol/l and inboth unstimulated and PMA/PHA-stimulated cells (P<0·05; one-wayANOVA with Dunnett’s post hoc test). Curcumin treatment at 30 µmol/l ledto the greatest reductions in pro-inflammatory cytokine release, with IL-2 releasedecreased by 96 % and TNFα release ablated to undetectable concentrationsin PMA/PHA-stimulated cells (P<0·05; one-way ANOVA with Dunnett’spost hoc test). The flavan-3-ol(–)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate, and the anthocyaninspelargonidin-3-O-glucoside and cyanidin 3-O-glucoside,significantly promoted the growth of Jurkat CD4+ T-lymphocytes at 1 µmol/l(P<0·05; one-way ANOVA with Dunnett’s post hoctest). Chlorogenic acid and 3-O-methylquercetin showed someanti-proliferative effects on Jurkat CD4+ T-lymphocytes under all treatmentconditions, although statistical significance was only achieved for the effects of3-O-methylquercetin (P<0·05; one-way ANOVA withDunnett’s post hoc test).Fig. 3


Identification of (poly)phenol treatments that modulate the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines by human lymphocytes.

Ford CT, Richardson S, McArdle F, Lotito SB, Crozier A, McArdle A, Jackson MJ - Br. J. Nutr. (2016)

Heat map showing the effects of polyphenols on cytokine release and growth byJurkat CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Compounds are ordered by molecular weight fromthe lowest weight (top) to the highest weight (bottom). Data are presented aspercentage differences from matched vehicle controls following 48 h of treatment.Treatment and control experiments were performed with or without 25 ng/ml phorbol12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and 5 µg/ml phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation at24 h. TNFα could not be measured in the absence of PMA/PHAstimulation. * Mean value was significantly different compared with vehicle controls(P<0·05; one-way ANOVA with Dunnett’s posthoc test). Examples of the data from which these heat maps are derived areprovided in the online Supplementary data to allow an assessment of the variabilityobserved in these studies.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836295&req=5

fig3: Heat map showing the effects of polyphenols on cytokine release and growth byJurkat CD4+ T-lymphocytes. Compounds are ordered by molecular weight fromthe lowest weight (top) to the highest weight (bottom). Data are presented aspercentage differences from matched vehicle controls following 48 h of treatment.Treatment and control experiments were performed with or without 25 ng/ml phorbol12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and 5 µg/ml phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation at24 h. TNFα could not be measured in the absence of PMA/PHAstimulation. * Mean value was significantly different compared with vehicle controls(P<0·05; one-way ANOVA with Dunnett’s posthoc test). Examples of the data from which these heat maps are derived areprovided in the online Supplementary data to allow an assessment of the variabilityobserved in these studies.
Mentions: Treatment with different polyphenols had varied effects on growth and pro-inflammatorycytokine release by Jurkat CD4+ T-lymphocytes (Fig. 3). Three polyphenols – resveratrol, isorhamnetin and curcumin –significantly reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine release at both 1 and 30 µmol/l and inboth unstimulated and PMA/PHA-stimulated cells (P<0·05; one-wayANOVA with Dunnett’s post hoc test). Curcumin treatment at 30 µmol/l ledto the greatest reductions in pro-inflammatory cytokine release, with IL-2 releasedecreased by 96 % and TNFα release ablated to undetectable concentrationsin PMA/PHA-stimulated cells (P<0·05; one-way ANOVA with Dunnett’spost hoc test). The flavan-3-ol(–)-epigallocatechin-3-O-gallate, and the anthocyaninspelargonidin-3-O-glucoside and cyanidin 3-O-glucoside,significantly promoted the growth of Jurkat CD4+ T-lymphocytes at 1 µmol/l(P<0·05; one-way ANOVA with Dunnett’s post hoctest). Chlorogenic acid and 3-O-methylquercetin showed someanti-proliferative effects on Jurkat CD4+ T-lymphocytes under all treatmentconditions, although statistical significance was only achieved for the effects of3-O-methylquercetin (P<0·05; one-way ANOVA withDunnett’s post hoc test).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: We compared thirty-one (poly)phenols and six (poly)phenol mixtures for effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine release by Jurkat T-lymphocytes.A number of (poly)phenols significantly altered cytokine release from Jurkat cells (P<0·05), but H2O2 generation did not correlate with cytokine release.These results suggest that (poly)phenols derived from onions, turmeric, red grapes, green tea and açai berries may help reduce the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in people at risk of chronic inflammation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: 1Department of Musculoskeletal Biology,Institute of Ageing and Chronic Disease,University of Liverpool,Liverpool L7 8TX,UK.

ABSTRACT
Diets rich in fruits and vegetables (FV), which contain (poly)phenols, protect against age-related inflammation and chronic diseases. T-lymphocytes contribute to systemic cytokine production and are modulated by FV intake. Little is known about the relative potency of different (poly)phenols in modulating cytokine release by lymphocytes. We compared thirty-one (poly)phenols and six (poly)phenol mixtures for effects on pro-inflammatory cytokine release by Jurkat T-lymphocytes. Test compounds were incubated with Jurkat cells for 48 h at 1 and 30 µm, with or without phorbol ester treatment at 24 h to induce cytokine release. Three test compounds that reduced cytokine release were further incubated with primary lymphocytes at 0·2 and 1 µm for 24 h, with lipopolysaccharide added at 5 h. Cytokine release was measured, and generation of H2O2 by test compounds was determined to assess any potential correlations with cytokine release. A number of (poly)phenols significantly altered cytokine release from Jurkat cells (P<0·05), but H2O2 generation did not correlate with cytokine release. Resveratrol, isorhamnetin, curcumin, vanillic acid and specific (poly)phenol mixtures reduced pro-inflammatory cytokine release from T-lymphocytes, and there was evidence for interaction between (poly)phenols to further modulate cytokine release. The release of interferon-γ induced protein 10 by primary lymphocytes was significantly reduced following treatment with 1 µm isorhamnetin (P<0·05). These results suggest that (poly)phenols derived from onions, turmeric, red grapes, green tea and açai berries may help reduce the release of pro-inflammatory mediators in people at risk of chronic inflammation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus