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Effect of pulsed radiofrequency on rat sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury: a preliminary study.

Li DY, Meng L, Ji N, Luo F - Chin. Med. J. (2015)

Bottom Line: Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application to the dorsal root ganglia can reduce neuropathic pain (NP) in animal models, but the effect of PRF on damaged peripheral nerves has not been examined.Ipsilateral MWT was significantly reduced and TWL significantly shorter compared to the contralateral side 14 days after CCI (both P = 0.000).In the PRF group, MWT was significantly higher and TWL significantly longer 14 days after the PRF treatment compared to before PRF treatment (both P = 0.000), while no such difference was observed in the sham group (P > 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100050, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application to the dorsal root ganglia can reduce neuropathic pain (NP) in animal models, but the effect of PRF on damaged peripheral nerves has not been examined. We investigated the effect of PRF to the rat sciatic nerve (SN) on pain-related behavior and SN ultrastructure following chronic constriction injury (CCI).

Methods: The analgesic effect was measured by hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL). Twenty rats with NP induced by ligating the common SN were then randomly divided into a PRF treatment group and a sham group. The contralateral SN served as a control. The MWT and TWL were determined again 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 days after the PRF or sham treatment. On day 14, ipsilateral and contralateral common SNs were excised and examined by electron microscopy.

Results: Ipsilateral MWT was significantly reduced and TWL significantly shorter compared to the contralateral side 14 days after CCI (both P = 0.000). In the PRF group, MWT was significantly higher and TWL significantly longer 14 days after the PRF treatment compared to before PRF treatment (both P = 0.000), while no such difference was observed in the sham group (P > 0.05). Electron microscopy revealed extensive demyelination and collagen fiber formation in the ipsilateral SN of sham-treated rats but sparse demyelination and some nerve fiber regrowth in the PRF treatment group.

Conclusions: Hyperalgesia is relieved, and ultrastructural damage ameliorated after direct PRF treatment to the SN in the CCI rat model of NP.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application to the injured sciatic nerve partially reverses mechanical hyperalgesia induced by chronic constriction injury as indicated by increased ipsilateral withdrawal threshold in the PRF group but not in the sham group. PRFT = Pulsed radiofrequency treatment (*P < 0.01 vs. before treatment; #P < 0.05, vs. control; †P < 0.01 vs. sham).
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Figure 2: Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application to the injured sciatic nerve partially reverses mechanical hyperalgesia induced by chronic constriction injury as indicated by increased ipsilateral withdrawal threshold in the PRF group but not in the sham group. PRFT = Pulsed radiofrequency treatment (*P < 0.01 vs. before treatment; #P < 0.05, vs. control; †P < 0.01 vs. sham).

Mentions: The differences in MWT after CCI, PRF, and sham treatment are shown in Figures 1 and 2. After ligation of the right (ipsilateral) common SN, the ipsilateral MWT gradually decreased. A sharp decrease was seen from day 4 (P = 0.001, Figure 1) after surgery and continued until day 14 (P = 0.000, Figure 1). From day 8–14 after PRF application, there was a significant increase in MWT above that measured before the PRF treatment (P = 0.001, 0.000, 0.000, and 0.000 respectively, Figure 2). On days 8, 10, 12, and 14 posttreatment, mean MWT was significantly higher in the PRF group compared to the sham group (P = 0.001, 0.000, 0.000, and 0.000 respectively, Figure 2) although still slightly lower than the unligated control value (P = 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, and 0.024 respectively, Figure 2).


Effect of pulsed radiofrequency on rat sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury: a preliminary study.

Li DY, Meng L, Ji N, Luo F - Chin. Med. J. (2015)

Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application to the injured sciatic nerve partially reverses mechanical hyperalgesia induced by chronic constriction injury as indicated by increased ipsilateral withdrawal threshold in the PRF group but not in the sham group. PRFT = Pulsed radiofrequency treatment (*P < 0.01 vs. before treatment; #P < 0.05, vs. control; †P < 0.01 vs. sham).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836261&req=5

Figure 2: Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application to the injured sciatic nerve partially reverses mechanical hyperalgesia induced by chronic constriction injury as indicated by increased ipsilateral withdrawal threshold in the PRF group but not in the sham group. PRFT = Pulsed radiofrequency treatment (*P < 0.01 vs. before treatment; #P < 0.05, vs. control; †P < 0.01 vs. sham).
Mentions: The differences in MWT after CCI, PRF, and sham treatment are shown in Figures 1 and 2. After ligation of the right (ipsilateral) common SN, the ipsilateral MWT gradually decreased. A sharp decrease was seen from day 4 (P = 0.001, Figure 1) after surgery and continued until day 14 (P = 0.000, Figure 1). From day 8–14 after PRF application, there was a significant increase in MWT above that measured before the PRF treatment (P = 0.001, 0.000, 0.000, and 0.000 respectively, Figure 2). On days 8, 10, 12, and 14 posttreatment, mean MWT was significantly higher in the PRF group compared to the sham group (P = 0.001, 0.000, 0.000, and 0.000 respectively, Figure 2) although still slightly lower than the unligated control value (P = 0.000, 0.000, 0.000, and 0.024 respectively, Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application to the dorsal root ganglia can reduce neuropathic pain (NP) in animal models, but the effect of PRF on damaged peripheral nerves has not been examined.Ipsilateral MWT was significantly reduced and TWL significantly shorter compared to the contralateral side 14 days after CCI (both P = 0.000).In the PRF group, MWT was significantly higher and TWL significantly longer 14 days after the PRF treatment compared to before PRF treatment (both P = 0.000), while no such difference was observed in the sham group (P > 0.05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Management, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100050, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application to the dorsal root ganglia can reduce neuropathic pain (NP) in animal models, but the effect of PRF on damaged peripheral nerves has not been examined. We investigated the effect of PRF to the rat sciatic nerve (SN) on pain-related behavior and SN ultrastructure following chronic constriction injury (CCI).

Methods: The analgesic effect was measured by hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL). Twenty rats with NP induced by ligating the common SN were then randomly divided into a PRF treatment group and a sham group. The contralateral SN served as a control. The MWT and TWL were determined again 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 days after the PRF or sham treatment. On day 14, ipsilateral and contralateral common SNs were excised and examined by electron microscopy.

Results: Ipsilateral MWT was significantly reduced and TWL significantly shorter compared to the contralateral side 14 days after CCI (both P = 0.000). In the PRF group, MWT was significantly higher and TWL significantly longer 14 days after the PRF treatment compared to before PRF treatment (both P = 0.000), while no such difference was observed in the sham group (P > 0.05). Electron microscopy revealed extensive demyelination and collagen fiber formation in the ipsilateral SN of sham-treated rats but sparse demyelination and some nerve fiber regrowth in the PRF treatment group.

Conclusions: Hyperalgesia is relieved, and ultrastructural damage ameliorated after direct PRF treatment to the SN in the CCI rat model of NP.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus