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Enantioselective Utilization of D-Amino Acids by Deep-Sea Microorganisms.

Kubota T, Kobayashi T, Nunoura T, Maruyama F, Deguchi S - Front Microbiol (2016)

Bottom Line: Microorganisms that utilize various D-amino acids (DAAs) were successfully isolated from deep-sea sediments.In contrast, the Nautella strains isolated from shallow-sea grew only with L-Val.No significant differences were found among the strains in the genome sequences including genes possibly related to DAA metabolisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research and Development Center for Marine Biosciences, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology Yokosuka, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Microorganisms that utilize various D-amino acids (DAAs) were successfully isolated from deep-sea sediments. The isolates were phylogenetically assigned to Alphaproteobacteria, Gammmaproteobacteria, and Bacilli. Some of the isolates exhibited high enantioselective degradation activities to various DAAs. In particular, the Alphaproteobacteria Nautella sp. strain A04V exhibited robust growth in minimal medium supplemented with D-Val as a sole carbon and nitrogen source, whereas its growth was poor on minimal medium supplemented with L-Val instead of D-Val. Its growth was facilitated most when racemic mixtures of valine were used. In contrast, the Nautella strains isolated from shallow-sea grew only with L-Val. No significant differences were found among the strains in the genome sequences including genes possibly related to DAA metabolisms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Deamination of amino acids to α-keto acids catalyzed by resting cells of strains A04V, N. italica LMG24365, and R11. Reactions were performed at 30°C for 1 h. Double asterisks (**) represent amino acids with L-enantiomers that were preferentially deaminated and the single asterisk (*) denotes those that deamination occurred preferentially for D-enantiomers. The data represent the mean ± SD (indicated by vertical bars) based on at least two independent experiments.
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Figure 7: Deamination of amino acids to α-keto acids catalyzed by resting cells of strains A04V, N. italica LMG24365, and R11. Reactions were performed at 30°C for 1 h. Double asterisks (**) represent amino acids with L-enantiomers that were preferentially deaminated and the single asterisk (*) denotes those that deamination occurred preferentially for D-enantiomers. The data represent the mean ± SD (indicated by vertical bars) based on at least two independent experiments.

Mentions: To elucidate the biochemical features of strain A04V, we compared the DAA degradation activities of N. italica strains A04V and LMG24365. The catalytic activities of the resting cells of strain A04V indicated that they could degrade various DAAs (Figure 7). DAA degradation activities were also detected in the resting cells of N. italica strains LMG24365, but they were extremely low compared with those of strain A04V (Figure 7). Both strains showed similar substrate specificities.


Enantioselective Utilization of D-Amino Acids by Deep-Sea Microorganisms.

Kubota T, Kobayashi T, Nunoura T, Maruyama F, Deguchi S - Front Microbiol (2016)

Deamination of amino acids to α-keto acids catalyzed by resting cells of strains A04V, N. italica LMG24365, and R11. Reactions were performed at 30°C for 1 h. Double asterisks (**) represent amino acids with L-enantiomers that were preferentially deaminated and the single asterisk (*) denotes those that deamination occurred preferentially for D-enantiomers. The data represent the mean ± SD (indicated by vertical bars) based on at least two independent experiments.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836201&req=5

Figure 7: Deamination of amino acids to α-keto acids catalyzed by resting cells of strains A04V, N. italica LMG24365, and R11. Reactions were performed at 30°C for 1 h. Double asterisks (**) represent amino acids with L-enantiomers that were preferentially deaminated and the single asterisk (*) denotes those that deamination occurred preferentially for D-enantiomers. The data represent the mean ± SD (indicated by vertical bars) based on at least two independent experiments.
Mentions: To elucidate the biochemical features of strain A04V, we compared the DAA degradation activities of N. italica strains A04V and LMG24365. The catalytic activities of the resting cells of strain A04V indicated that they could degrade various DAAs (Figure 7). DAA degradation activities were also detected in the resting cells of N. italica strains LMG24365, but they were extremely low compared with those of strain A04V (Figure 7). Both strains showed similar substrate specificities.

Bottom Line: Microorganisms that utilize various D-amino acids (DAAs) were successfully isolated from deep-sea sediments.In contrast, the Nautella strains isolated from shallow-sea grew only with L-Val.No significant differences were found among the strains in the genome sequences including genes possibly related to DAA metabolisms.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research and Development Center for Marine Biosciences, Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology Yokosuka, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Microorganisms that utilize various D-amino acids (DAAs) were successfully isolated from deep-sea sediments. The isolates were phylogenetically assigned to Alphaproteobacteria, Gammmaproteobacteria, and Bacilli. Some of the isolates exhibited high enantioselective degradation activities to various DAAs. In particular, the Alphaproteobacteria Nautella sp. strain A04V exhibited robust growth in minimal medium supplemented with D-Val as a sole carbon and nitrogen source, whereas its growth was poor on minimal medium supplemented with L-Val instead of D-Val. Its growth was facilitated most when racemic mixtures of valine were used. In contrast, the Nautella strains isolated from shallow-sea grew only with L-Val. No significant differences were found among the strains in the genome sequences including genes possibly related to DAA metabolisms.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus