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Patients with Advanced Ovarian Cancer Administered Oral Etoposide following Taxane as Maintenance Chemotherapy.

Nagano H, Tachibana Y, Kawakami M, Ueno M, Morita Y, Muraoka M, Takagi K - Case Rep Oncol (2016)

Bottom Line: The fundamental goal of maintenance therapy is to improve survival outcomes.Three to five cycles of etoposide were administered to all patients, though daily dosage was reduced to 25 mg in 2 patients due to toxicity.The median progression-free survival was 43.5 months, the median overall survival was 86 months, and 5-year overall survival was 77.1%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Medical Center East, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The concept of maintenance therapy is one of the highly relevant approaches in the management of advanced ovarian cancer. The fundamental goal of maintenance therapy is to improve survival outcomes. We attempted to reinforce maintenance chemotherapy by adding oral etoposide following taxane administration.

Cases: We retrospectively evaluated 14 patients with advanced ovarian cancer who had achieved clinically defined complete response to a primary platinum/taxane chemotherapy regimen and who were administered oral etoposide (50 mg/day × 21 days per cycle monthly for 3-5 cycles) following paclitaxel or docetaxel administration as maintenance chemotherapy. With regard to oral etoposide toxicity, grade 2 oral mucositis and grade 3 anemia were observed in 1 patient each. Three to five cycles of etoposide were administered to all patients, though daily dosage was reduced to 25 mg in 2 patients due to toxicity. The median progression-free survival was 43.5 months, the median overall survival was 86 months, and 5-year overall survival was 77.1%.

Conclusion: The results from this ovarian cancer treatment evaluation suggest that oral etoposide may be administered safely following paclitaxel or docetaxel as maintenance chemotherapy. We expect this regimen to contribute to the improvement in the survival outcomes of patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

OS with a median follow-up period of 61 months (range: 50–99 months) from treatment initiation for censored patients.
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Figure 2: OS with a median follow-up period of 61 months (range: 50–99 months) from treatment initiation for censored patients.

Mentions: PFS was defined as the duration from the date of initial therapy (surgery or neoadjuvant chemotherapy) to the date of the first indication of disease progression or death, whichever occurred first. Data for patients who were alive without disease progression were censored as of the date of their last assessment. OS was calculated from the date of initial therapy to the date of death from any cause; data for patients still alive were censored at the date the patient was last known to be alive. The Kaplan-Meier method was applied to estimate PFS and OS curves. As of the most recent assessment, the median follow-up period for censored patients was 61 months (range: 50–99 months) from the initiation of treatment; 10 patients (71.4%) exhibited disease progression, and 5 (35.7%) died from their disease. The median PFS was 43.5 months (range: 24–92 months); the median OS for this patient population was 86 months (range: 43–99 months), and the 5-year OS rate was 77.1%. Fig. 1 and fig. 2 display the PFS and OS of the study cohort. The 5-year OS rate for all 34 patients with advanced ovarian cancer in our institute treated during the same periods was 58.5%.


Patients with Advanced Ovarian Cancer Administered Oral Etoposide following Taxane as Maintenance Chemotherapy.

Nagano H, Tachibana Y, Kawakami M, Ueno M, Morita Y, Muraoka M, Takagi K - Case Rep Oncol (2016)

OS with a median follow-up period of 61 months (range: 50–99 months) from treatment initiation for censored patients.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836143&req=5

Figure 2: OS with a median follow-up period of 61 months (range: 50–99 months) from treatment initiation for censored patients.
Mentions: PFS was defined as the duration from the date of initial therapy (surgery or neoadjuvant chemotherapy) to the date of the first indication of disease progression or death, whichever occurred first. Data for patients who were alive without disease progression were censored as of the date of their last assessment. OS was calculated from the date of initial therapy to the date of death from any cause; data for patients still alive were censored at the date the patient was last known to be alive. The Kaplan-Meier method was applied to estimate PFS and OS curves. As of the most recent assessment, the median follow-up period for censored patients was 61 months (range: 50–99 months) from the initiation of treatment; 10 patients (71.4%) exhibited disease progression, and 5 (35.7%) died from their disease. The median PFS was 43.5 months (range: 24–92 months); the median OS for this patient population was 86 months (range: 43–99 months), and the 5-year OS rate was 77.1%. Fig. 1 and fig. 2 display the PFS and OS of the study cohort. The 5-year OS rate for all 34 patients with advanced ovarian cancer in our institute treated during the same periods was 58.5%.

Bottom Line: The fundamental goal of maintenance therapy is to improve survival outcomes.Three to five cycles of etoposide were administered to all patients, though daily dosage was reduced to 25 mg in 2 patients due to toxicity.The median progression-free survival was 43.5 months, the median overall survival was 86 months, and 5-year overall survival was 77.1%.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Tokyo Women's Medical University, Medical Center East, Tokyo, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The concept of maintenance therapy is one of the highly relevant approaches in the management of advanced ovarian cancer. The fundamental goal of maintenance therapy is to improve survival outcomes. We attempted to reinforce maintenance chemotherapy by adding oral etoposide following taxane administration.

Cases: We retrospectively evaluated 14 patients with advanced ovarian cancer who had achieved clinically defined complete response to a primary platinum/taxane chemotherapy regimen and who were administered oral etoposide (50 mg/day × 21 days per cycle monthly for 3-5 cycles) following paclitaxel or docetaxel administration as maintenance chemotherapy. With regard to oral etoposide toxicity, grade 2 oral mucositis and grade 3 anemia were observed in 1 patient each. Three to five cycles of etoposide were administered to all patients, though daily dosage was reduced to 25 mg in 2 patients due to toxicity. The median progression-free survival was 43.5 months, the median overall survival was 86 months, and 5-year overall survival was 77.1%.

Conclusion: The results from this ovarian cancer treatment evaluation suggest that oral etoposide may be administered safely following paclitaxel or docetaxel as maintenance chemotherapy. We expect this regimen to contribute to the improvement in the survival outcomes of patients with advanced ovarian cancer.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus