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Serum lipid levels are positively correlated with lumbar disc herniation--a retrospective study of 790 Chinese patients.

Zhang Y, Zhao Y, Wang M, Si M, Li J, Hou Y, Jia J, Nie L - Lipids Health Dis (2016)

Bottom Line: Ratios of TC/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C were significantly associated with disc herniation (P < 0.001 for both).However, hyperlipidaemia did not seem to be associated with the herniated segment of the lumbar intervertebral disc (p = 0.374).The present study suggests that dyslipidaemia may be associated with a higher risk of developing lumbar disc herniation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 250012, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Abnormal serum lipid levels have been shown to be associated with the occurrence of atherosclerosis, but little is known about the relationships of them with the risk of developing intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD) in Chinese population.

Methods: We performed a case-control study to assess the relationship between serum lipid levels and lumbar disc degeneration. A total of 790 Chinese patients were recruited for this study at the time of hospitalization. We examined fasting serum lipid levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). 396 patients (235 men and 161 women; mean age: 41.07 years) underwent surgery for single-level lumbar disc herniation. A control group of 394 patients (225 men and 169 women; mean age: 42.1 years) underwent surgery for wounded lower limbs during the same period. Patients in the control group were collected randomly from among patients who were age- and sex-matched patients with the case group.

Results: Patients with lumbar disc herniation had significantly higher TC and LDL-C serum concentrations (P < 0.001 for both) than controls. Percentage of High-TC, High-TG, High-LDL-C, borderline High-TC and borderline High-LDL-C were significantly higher in the disc herniation group (P = 0.017, P = 0.002, P = 0.039, P =0.002 and P < 0.001, respectively). Ratios of TC/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C were significantly associated with disc herniation (P < 0.001 for both). Logistic regression revealed that patients with higher serum LDL-C levels had a higher risk of disc herniation, in which odds ratio (OR) was 1.462 and confidence interval (CI) was 1.179 ~ 1.813. Moreover, patients with High-TG and borderline High-LDL-C had a higher probability of disc herniation (OR: 2.974, CI: 1.488 ~ 5.945, statistical power: 100%; OR: 1.626, CI: 1.012 ~ 2.612, statistical power: 61.4%, respectively). However, hyperlipidaemia did not seem to be associated with the herniated segment of the lumbar intervertebral disc (p = 0.374).

Conclusions: The present study suggests that dyslipidaemia may be associated with a higher risk of developing lumbar disc herniation. Serum lipid levels could be a useful predictor for intervertebral disc degeneration in Chinese population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationships between dyslipidaemia, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and lumbar disc herniation. The potential pathogenetic mechanism underlining the connection between serum lipid levels and lumbar disc herniation might be through atherosclerosis and inflammatory pathways
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Fig3: Relationships between dyslipidaemia, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and lumbar disc herniation. The potential pathogenetic mechanism underlining the connection between serum lipid levels and lumbar disc herniation might be through atherosclerosis and inflammatory pathways

Mentions: Another potential pathogenetic mechanism underlying the link between serum lipid levels and LDH could be through inflammatory pathways. Previous studies reported that pro-inflammatory cytokine were associationed with serum lipid levels [37, 38]. Activation of cytokines plays a role in the development of disc degeneration [19, 20, 39]. Besides, it is possible that increased serum lipid levels enhance inflammatory response or basic level of systemic inflammation, resulting in disc degeneration [27]. Moreover, atherosclerosis as an inflammatory disease [40] is initiated by endothelial injury due to oxidative stress in the context of dyslipidaemia [41]. The relationship between dyslipidaemia, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and disc degeneration is depicted in Fig. 3.Fig. 3


Serum lipid levels are positively correlated with lumbar disc herniation--a retrospective study of 790 Chinese patients.

Zhang Y, Zhao Y, Wang M, Si M, Li J, Hou Y, Jia J, Nie L - Lipids Health Dis (2016)

Relationships between dyslipidaemia, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and lumbar disc herniation. The potential pathogenetic mechanism underlining the connection between serum lipid levels and lumbar disc herniation might be through atherosclerosis and inflammatory pathways
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836107&req=5

Fig3: Relationships between dyslipidaemia, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and lumbar disc herniation. The potential pathogenetic mechanism underlining the connection between serum lipid levels and lumbar disc herniation might be through atherosclerosis and inflammatory pathways
Mentions: Another potential pathogenetic mechanism underlying the link between serum lipid levels and LDH could be through inflammatory pathways. Previous studies reported that pro-inflammatory cytokine were associationed with serum lipid levels [37, 38]. Activation of cytokines plays a role in the development of disc degeneration [19, 20, 39]. Besides, it is possible that increased serum lipid levels enhance inflammatory response or basic level of systemic inflammation, resulting in disc degeneration [27]. Moreover, atherosclerosis as an inflammatory disease [40] is initiated by endothelial injury due to oxidative stress in the context of dyslipidaemia [41]. The relationship between dyslipidaemia, atherosclerosis, inflammation, and disc degeneration is depicted in Fig. 3.Fig. 3

Bottom Line: Ratios of TC/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C were significantly associated with disc herniation (P < 0.001 for both).However, hyperlipidaemia did not seem to be associated with the herniated segment of the lumbar intervertebral disc (p = 0.374).The present study suggests that dyslipidaemia may be associated with a higher risk of developing lumbar disc herniation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopaedics, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong, 250012, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Abnormal serum lipid levels have been shown to be associated with the occurrence of atherosclerosis, but little is known about the relationships of them with the risk of developing intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD) in Chinese population.

Methods: We performed a case-control study to assess the relationship between serum lipid levels and lumbar disc degeneration. A total of 790 Chinese patients were recruited for this study at the time of hospitalization. We examined fasting serum lipid levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). 396 patients (235 men and 161 women; mean age: 41.07 years) underwent surgery for single-level lumbar disc herniation. A control group of 394 patients (225 men and 169 women; mean age: 42.1 years) underwent surgery for wounded lower limbs during the same period. Patients in the control group were collected randomly from among patients who were age- and sex-matched patients with the case group.

Results: Patients with lumbar disc herniation had significantly higher TC and LDL-C serum concentrations (P < 0.001 for both) than controls. Percentage of High-TC, High-TG, High-LDL-C, borderline High-TC and borderline High-LDL-C were significantly higher in the disc herniation group (P = 0.017, P = 0.002, P = 0.039, P =0.002 and P < 0.001, respectively). Ratios of TC/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C were significantly associated with disc herniation (P < 0.001 for both). Logistic regression revealed that patients with higher serum LDL-C levels had a higher risk of disc herniation, in which odds ratio (OR) was 1.462 and confidence interval (CI) was 1.179 ~ 1.813. Moreover, patients with High-TG and borderline High-LDL-C had a higher probability of disc herniation (OR: 2.974, CI: 1.488 ~ 5.945, statistical power: 100%; OR: 1.626, CI: 1.012 ~ 2.612, statistical power: 61.4%, respectively). However, hyperlipidaemia did not seem to be associated with the herniated segment of the lumbar intervertebral disc (p = 0.374).

Conclusions: The present study suggests that dyslipidaemia may be associated with a higher risk of developing lumbar disc herniation. Serum lipid levels could be a useful predictor for intervertebral disc degeneration in Chinese population.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus