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Adult-onset cystic hygroma: A case report of rare entity.

Bahl S, Shah V, Anchlia S, Vyas S - Indian J Dent (2016 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: Patients presenting with a painless, soft, fluctuant, and enlarging neck mass should have a careful history and physical examination along with radiological imaging to assist with diagnosis.Surgical intervention is the treatment of choice for this rare condition.The objectives of this case report are to discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, histopathological findings and management of this malformation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, K.M Shah Dental College, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth University, Vadodara, India.

ABSTRACT
Cystic hygroma is a benign congenital malformation of the lymphatic system that occurs in infant or children younger than 2 years of age. Although cystic hygroma is well recognized in pediatric practice, it seldom presents de novo in adulthood. These are commonly present in head and neck but can be present anywhere. Cystic hygroma is very rare in adults, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adult neck swellings. Patients presenting with a painless, soft, fluctuant, and enlarging neck mass should have a careful history and physical examination along with radiological imaging to assist with diagnosis. Surgical intervention is the treatment of choice for this rare condition. Here, we are reporting a case of cystic hygroma in a 32-year-old male patient in the neck region. The objectives of this case report are to discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, histopathological findings and management of this malformation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a) Computed tomography axial contrast is showing well defined, lobulated, hypodense cystic lesion present on right side in neck off the midline below the submandibular gland and compressing the same. (b) Postcontrast axial computed tomography shows no enhancement
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Figure 2: (a) Computed tomography axial contrast is showing well defined, lobulated, hypodense cystic lesion present on right side in neck off the midline below the submandibular gland and compressing the same. (b) Postcontrast axial computed tomography shows no enhancement

Mentions: A 32-year-old male patient reported with a chief complaint of pain and swelling over the right lower third region of face extending into the neck until [Figure 1a and b] the midline since 8 months. The swelling was associated with pain that was mild, dull aching, continuous and nonradiating in nature. There was no history of fever, trauma, toothache, pus discharge, but there was a history of restricted mouth opening since 1-month. On extraoral examination and palpation [Figure 1b], a single diffuse swelling was present over right submandibular and a submental region extending into neck till midline that was soft, tender, and fluctuant in nature. On intraoral examination [Figure 1c], no abnormal finding was seen, occlusion was normal. On aspiration light brown colored and stingy fluid was obtained from the affected area. The computed tomography axial contrast [Figure 2a] showed a well-defined lobulated, hypodense cystic lesion of size (27.2 mm × 45.9 mm) present on right side in the neck of the midline just below the submandibular gland and compressing the same. Postcontrast axial computed tomography [Figure 2b] shows no enhancement. Radiologically features were suggestive of a cystic lesion in the right side of the neck. Based on clinical and radiographic findings, provisional diagnosis of plunging ranula of right side of neck was made with differential diagnosis of enlarged submandibular and submental lymph nodes, branchial cyst, dermoid cyst, lipoma, thyroglossal cyst, subhyoid bursitis, and lymphangioma.


Adult-onset cystic hygroma: A case report of rare entity.

Bahl S, Shah V, Anchlia S, Vyas S - Indian J Dent (2016 Jan-Mar)

(a) Computed tomography axial contrast is showing well defined, lobulated, hypodense cystic lesion present on right side in neck off the midline below the submandibular gland and compressing the same. (b) Postcontrast axial computed tomography shows no enhancement
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836099&req=5

Figure 2: (a) Computed tomography axial contrast is showing well defined, lobulated, hypodense cystic lesion present on right side in neck off the midline below the submandibular gland and compressing the same. (b) Postcontrast axial computed tomography shows no enhancement
Mentions: A 32-year-old male patient reported with a chief complaint of pain and swelling over the right lower third region of face extending into the neck until [Figure 1a and b] the midline since 8 months. The swelling was associated with pain that was mild, dull aching, continuous and nonradiating in nature. There was no history of fever, trauma, toothache, pus discharge, but there was a history of restricted mouth opening since 1-month. On extraoral examination and palpation [Figure 1b], a single diffuse swelling was present over right submandibular and a submental region extending into neck till midline that was soft, tender, and fluctuant in nature. On intraoral examination [Figure 1c], no abnormal finding was seen, occlusion was normal. On aspiration light brown colored and stingy fluid was obtained from the affected area. The computed tomography axial contrast [Figure 2a] showed a well-defined lobulated, hypodense cystic lesion of size (27.2 mm × 45.9 mm) present on right side in the neck of the midline just below the submandibular gland and compressing the same. Postcontrast axial computed tomography [Figure 2b] shows no enhancement. Radiologically features were suggestive of a cystic lesion in the right side of the neck. Based on clinical and radiographic findings, provisional diagnosis of plunging ranula of right side of neck was made with differential diagnosis of enlarged submandibular and submental lymph nodes, branchial cyst, dermoid cyst, lipoma, thyroglossal cyst, subhyoid bursitis, and lymphangioma.

Bottom Line: Patients presenting with a painless, soft, fluctuant, and enlarging neck mass should have a careful history and physical examination along with radiological imaging to assist with diagnosis.Surgical intervention is the treatment of choice for this rare condition.The objectives of this case report are to discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, histopathological findings and management of this malformation.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology, K.M Shah Dental College, Sumandeep Vidyapeeth University, Vadodara, India.

ABSTRACT
Cystic hygroma is a benign congenital malformation of the lymphatic system that occurs in infant or children younger than 2 years of age. Although cystic hygroma is well recognized in pediatric practice, it seldom presents de novo in adulthood. These are commonly present in head and neck but can be present anywhere. Cystic hygroma is very rare in adults, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adult neck swellings. Patients presenting with a painless, soft, fluctuant, and enlarging neck mass should have a careful history and physical examination along with radiological imaging to assist with diagnosis. Surgical intervention is the treatment of choice for this rare condition. Here, we are reporting a case of cystic hygroma in a 32-year-old male patient in the neck region. The objectives of this case report are to discuss the clinical presentation, diagnosis, histopathological findings and management of this malformation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus