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A unique functional craniofacial suture that may normally never ossify: A cone-beam computed tomography-based report of two cases.

Poorsattar Bejeh Mir K, Poorsattar Bejeh Mir A, Bejeh Mir MP, Haghanifar S - Indian J Dent (2016 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: In cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) evaluation, an in-ossified suture was found in anterior two-third of midpalatal region of both individuals.The application of clinical vignettes from CBCT findings for maxillofacial orthodontic and orthopedic purposes is of value.Existing cases of successful nonsurgical rapid palatal expansion of maxilla in adults could surrogate this dogma about timing for ossification of midpalatal suture which is considered as a purely chronologic-related phenomenon and transmitted masticatory forces may be one possible cause (functional hypothesis).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Amir Mazandarani General Hospital, Sari, Iran.

ABSTRACT
The premise of complete ossification of midpalatal suture in early adulthood still has its popularity, though conflicting data are emerging in the literature. A 49-year-old male and a 54-year-old female Iranian patient, both dentulous, were referred to a Maxillofacial Radiology Center to be evaluated for implant insertion. In cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) evaluation, an in-ossified suture was found in anterior two-third of midpalatal region of both individuals. The application of clinical vignettes from CBCT findings for maxillofacial orthodontic and orthopedic purposes is of value. Existing cases of successful nonsurgical rapid palatal expansion of maxilla in adults could surrogate this dogma about timing for ossification of midpalatal suture which is considered as a purely chronologic-related phenomenon and transmitted masticatory forces may be one possible cause (functional hypothesis).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

(a-c) Axial cone-beam computed tomography slices of the second patient. (a) note the posterior fusion and interdigitating of more anterior parts. (b) Invert view. Note the fusion, parallel line portion, and interdigitating portion. Darker areas indicated denser parts (cortical vs. cancellous bone). (c) Comparison of gray scale range of two horizontal lines intersecting complete and incomplete fused parts. Darker areas indicated denser parts (cortical vs. cancellous bone). The center of these imaginary line was set at the midline bisecting the incisive foramen (i.e., corresponds to point 1.2 mm of the figure with 1.2 mm extension to each side)
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Figure 2: (a-c) Axial cone-beam computed tomography slices of the second patient. (a) note the posterior fusion and interdigitating of more anterior parts. (b) Invert view. Note the fusion, parallel line portion, and interdigitating portion. Darker areas indicated denser parts (cortical vs. cancellous bone). (c) Comparison of gray scale range of two horizontal lines intersecting complete and incomplete fused parts. Darker areas indicated denser parts (cortical vs. cancellous bone). The center of these imaginary line was set at the midline bisecting the incisive foramen (i.e., corresponds to point 1.2 mm of the figure with 1.2 mm extension to each side)

Mentions: Evaluation of the second patient revealed the posterior third ossification which continued anteriorly as interdigitating cortical plates of approaching halves and also separated parallel lines [Figure 2a–c].


A unique functional craniofacial suture that may normally never ossify: A cone-beam computed tomography-based report of two cases.

Poorsattar Bejeh Mir K, Poorsattar Bejeh Mir A, Bejeh Mir MP, Haghanifar S - Indian J Dent (2016 Jan-Mar)

(a-c) Axial cone-beam computed tomography slices of the second patient. (a) note the posterior fusion and interdigitating of more anterior parts. (b) Invert view. Note the fusion, parallel line portion, and interdigitating portion. Darker areas indicated denser parts (cortical vs. cancellous bone). (c) Comparison of gray scale range of two horizontal lines intersecting complete and incomplete fused parts. Darker areas indicated denser parts (cortical vs. cancellous bone). The center of these imaginary line was set at the midline bisecting the incisive foramen (i.e., corresponds to point 1.2 mm of the figure with 1.2 mm extension to each side)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836098&req=5

Figure 2: (a-c) Axial cone-beam computed tomography slices of the second patient. (a) note the posterior fusion and interdigitating of more anterior parts. (b) Invert view. Note the fusion, parallel line portion, and interdigitating portion. Darker areas indicated denser parts (cortical vs. cancellous bone). (c) Comparison of gray scale range of two horizontal lines intersecting complete and incomplete fused parts. Darker areas indicated denser parts (cortical vs. cancellous bone). The center of these imaginary line was set at the midline bisecting the incisive foramen (i.e., corresponds to point 1.2 mm of the figure with 1.2 mm extension to each side)
Mentions: Evaluation of the second patient revealed the posterior third ossification which continued anteriorly as interdigitating cortical plates of approaching halves and also separated parallel lines [Figure 2a–c].

Bottom Line: In cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) evaluation, an in-ossified suture was found in anterior two-third of midpalatal region of both individuals.The application of clinical vignettes from CBCT findings for maxillofacial orthodontic and orthopedic purposes is of value.Existing cases of successful nonsurgical rapid palatal expansion of maxilla in adults could surrogate this dogma about timing for ossification of midpalatal suture which is considered as a purely chronologic-related phenomenon and transmitted masticatory forces may be one possible cause (functional hypothesis).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neonatology, Amir Mazandarani General Hospital, Sari, Iran.

ABSTRACT
The premise of complete ossification of midpalatal suture in early adulthood still has its popularity, though conflicting data are emerging in the literature. A 49-year-old male and a 54-year-old female Iranian patient, both dentulous, were referred to a Maxillofacial Radiology Center to be evaluated for implant insertion. In cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) evaluation, an in-ossified suture was found in anterior two-third of midpalatal region of both individuals. The application of clinical vignettes from CBCT findings for maxillofacial orthodontic and orthopedic purposes is of value. Existing cases of successful nonsurgical rapid palatal expansion of maxilla in adults could surrogate this dogma about timing for ossification of midpalatal suture which is considered as a purely chronologic-related phenomenon and transmitted masticatory forces may be one possible cause (functional hypothesis).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus