Limits...
Psammomatoid juvenile ossifying fibroma of mandible in a 6-year-old child.

Manjunatha BS, Purohit S, Kiran S, Mahita VN - Indian J Dent (2016 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: The psammomatous type of JOF (PsJOF) principally involves the bones of the orbit and paranasal sinuses.Here, we report a challenging case of PsJOF in a 6-year-old child with a complaint of swelling imitating a cystic lesion in left back region of the lower jaw for 2 months.The authors propose that a careful examination and correlations of clinical, radiological, and histopathological features are essential to arrive at correct diagnosis and play a vital role in management of such patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dental Anatomy and Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, Al-Hawaiyah, Taif University, Taif, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
Juvenile ossifying fibroma (JOF) is a rare fibro-osseous lesion of the jaw occurs at the early age of onset frequently under 15 years with a propensity to recur. It appears as a unilobulated/multilobulated lesion at an early stage followed by radiopaque appearance surrounded by radiolucent rimming at advanced stages. The psammomatous type of JOF (PsJOF) principally involves the bones of the orbit and paranasal sinuses. However in some cases, maxilla or rarely the mandible may be pretentious. Here, we report a challenging case of PsJOF in a 6-year-old child with a complaint of swelling imitating a cystic lesion in left back region of the lower jaw for 2 months. The authors propose that a careful examination and correlations of clinical, radiological, and histopathological features are essential to arrive at correct diagnosis and play a vital role in management of such patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Panoramic radiograph showing large radiolucent area on right side of molar area posterior to permanent first molar
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836097&req=5

Figure 2: Panoramic radiograph showing large radiolucent area on right side of molar area posterior to permanent first molar

Mentions: A 6-year-old male patient came with a complaint of nontender swelling in the lower right back region for 2 months. The extraoral examination revealed a nontender, diffuse, and hard swelling with slight facial asymmetry located near the right body of the mandible [Figure 1a and b]. The swelling was nontender, diffuse, and hard located near the right body of the mandible. No discharge of pus or drainage from the swelling and paresthesia of the lip or restricted mouth opening were noted. Intraoral examination revealed a painless swelling measuring about 2 cm × 3 cm involving the teeth number 85 and number 46 with obliteration of the buccal vestibule. The associated teeth were noncarious with no lymphadenopathy. Radiographs such as intraoral periapical, panoramic, and lateral views of a skull displayed a large radiolucency with intact inferior border of the mandible on the right side. The lesion was extending from distal to the first molar until the mesial ramus of mandible anterioposteriorly. The panoramic view showed erupted first molar without root completion, and developing second molar tooth bud in posterior part of the mandible [Figure 2]. Routine blood and urine investigations were normal. No other bones of the skeleton were involved, and no other abnormalities were found on general physical examination. The medical history was noncontributory, and there was no family history of similar lesion or other skeletal diseases. Differential diagnosis included odontogenic keratocyst, cemento-ossifying fibroma (OF), and central giant cell granuloma.


Psammomatoid juvenile ossifying fibroma of mandible in a 6-year-old child.

Manjunatha BS, Purohit S, Kiran S, Mahita VN - Indian J Dent (2016 Jan-Mar)

Panoramic radiograph showing large radiolucent area on right side of molar area posterior to permanent first molar
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836097&req=5

Figure 2: Panoramic radiograph showing large radiolucent area on right side of molar area posterior to permanent first molar
Mentions: A 6-year-old male patient came with a complaint of nontender swelling in the lower right back region for 2 months. The extraoral examination revealed a nontender, diffuse, and hard swelling with slight facial asymmetry located near the right body of the mandible [Figure 1a and b]. The swelling was nontender, diffuse, and hard located near the right body of the mandible. No discharge of pus or drainage from the swelling and paresthesia of the lip or restricted mouth opening were noted. Intraoral examination revealed a painless swelling measuring about 2 cm × 3 cm involving the teeth number 85 and number 46 with obliteration of the buccal vestibule. The associated teeth were noncarious with no lymphadenopathy. Radiographs such as intraoral periapical, panoramic, and lateral views of a skull displayed a large radiolucency with intact inferior border of the mandible on the right side. The lesion was extending from distal to the first molar until the mesial ramus of mandible anterioposteriorly. The panoramic view showed erupted first molar without root completion, and developing second molar tooth bud in posterior part of the mandible [Figure 2]. Routine blood and urine investigations were normal. No other bones of the skeleton were involved, and no other abnormalities were found on general physical examination. The medical history was noncontributory, and there was no family history of similar lesion or other skeletal diseases. Differential diagnosis included odontogenic keratocyst, cemento-ossifying fibroma (OF), and central giant cell granuloma.

Bottom Line: The psammomatous type of JOF (PsJOF) principally involves the bones of the orbit and paranasal sinuses.Here, we report a challenging case of PsJOF in a 6-year-old child with a complaint of swelling imitating a cystic lesion in left back region of the lower jaw for 2 months.The authors propose that a careful examination and correlations of clinical, radiological, and histopathological features are essential to arrive at correct diagnosis and play a vital role in management of such patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dental Anatomy and Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, Al-Hawaiyah, Taif University, Taif, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
Juvenile ossifying fibroma (JOF) is a rare fibro-osseous lesion of the jaw occurs at the early age of onset frequently under 15 years with a propensity to recur. It appears as a unilobulated/multilobulated lesion at an early stage followed by radiopaque appearance surrounded by radiolucent rimming at advanced stages. The psammomatous type of JOF (PsJOF) principally involves the bones of the orbit and paranasal sinuses. However in some cases, maxilla or rarely the mandible may be pretentious. Here, we report a challenging case of PsJOF in a 6-year-old child with a complaint of swelling imitating a cystic lesion in left back region of the lower jaw for 2 months. The authors propose that a careful examination and correlations of clinical, radiological, and histopathological features are essential to arrive at correct diagnosis and play a vital role in management of such patients.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus