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Glandular odontogenic cyst: A diagnostic dilemma.

Shah AA, Sangle A, Bussari S, Koshy AV - Indian J Dent (2016 Jan-Mar)

Bottom Line: It poses a diagnostic challenge as it can be clinically and histopathologically confused with lateral periodontal cyst, botryoid odontogenic cyst, radicular and residual cysts with mucous metaplasia, and low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma.The present case report describes GOC in both male and female patients with intra-oral swelling following extraction of 36 and 46, respectively.Careful histopathological examination is needed to diagnose GOC, and a careful long-term follow-up is advocated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, M.A. Rangoonwala College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Azam Campus, Pune, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare and uncommon jaw bone cyst of odontogenic origin described in 1987 by Gardener et al. as a distinct entity. It is a cyst having an unpredictable, potentially aggressive behavior, and has the propensity to grow in large size with relatively high recurrence rate. It poses a diagnostic challenge as it can be clinically and histopathologically confused with lateral periodontal cyst, botryoid odontogenic cyst, radicular and residual cysts with mucous metaplasia, and low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The present case report describes GOC in both male and female patients with intra-oral swelling following extraction of 36 and 46, respectively. Careful histopathological examination is needed to diagnose GOC, and a careful long-term follow-up is advocated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Intraoral periapical radiograph showing unilocular radiolucency with well-defined borders involving 35 and 37. Sclerotic border can be noted, and there is no root resorption. Missing 36 can be noted
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Figure 5: Intraoral periapical radiograph showing unilocular radiolucency with well-defined borders involving 35 and 37. Sclerotic border can be noted, and there is no root resorption. Missing 36 can be noted

Mentions: A 25-year-old male patient reported to our institution with a swelling in the lower left posterior region of lower jaw for 2 months that followed the extraction of 36 [Figure 1]. The swelling was gradually increasing in size. Medical history was not significant. Extraoral examination revealed swelling that was bony hard and nontender on palpation. Overlying skin was normal. Submandibular lymph nodes were not palpable. Intraoral examination revealed swelling extending from the left second premolar to the second molar region, causing the expansion of both buccal and lingual aspect of alveolar ridge [Figures 2–4]. Radiographic examination (intraoral periapical radiograph [IOPA and OPG]) revealed well–defined, unilocular radiolucency with sclerotic borders in relation to 35–37 and 36 were missing [Figures 5 and 6]. Based on the clinical and radiographic findings, a provisional diagnosis of residual cyst or odontogenic keratocyst was made. Enucleation of the cyst was done and sent for histopathological examination.


Glandular odontogenic cyst: A diagnostic dilemma.

Shah AA, Sangle A, Bussari S, Koshy AV - Indian J Dent (2016 Jan-Mar)

Intraoral periapical radiograph showing unilocular radiolucency with well-defined borders involving 35 and 37. Sclerotic border can be noted, and there is no root resorption. Missing 36 can be noted
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4836096&req=5

Figure 5: Intraoral periapical radiograph showing unilocular radiolucency with well-defined borders involving 35 and 37. Sclerotic border can be noted, and there is no root resorption. Missing 36 can be noted
Mentions: A 25-year-old male patient reported to our institution with a swelling in the lower left posterior region of lower jaw for 2 months that followed the extraction of 36 [Figure 1]. The swelling was gradually increasing in size. Medical history was not significant. Extraoral examination revealed swelling that was bony hard and nontender on palpation. Overlying skin was normal. Submandibular lymph nodes were not palpable. Intraoral examination revealed swelling extending from the left second premolar to the second molar region, causing the expansion of both buccal and lingual aspect of alveolar ridge [Figures 2–4]. Radiographic examination (intraoral periapical radiograph [IOPA and OPG]) revealed well–defined, unilocular radiolucency with sclerotic borders in relation to 35–37 and 36 were missing [Figures 5 and 6]. Based on the clinical and radiographic findings, a provisional diagnosis of residual cyst or odontogenic keratocyst was made. Enucleation of the cyst was done and sent for histopathological examination.

Bottom Line: It poses a diagnostic challenge as it can be clinically and histopathologically confused with lateral periodontal cyst, botryoid odontogenic cyst, radicular and residual cysts with mucous metaplasia, and low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma.The present case report describes GOC in both male and female patients with intra-oral swelling following extraction of 36 and 46, respectively.Careful histopathological examination is needed to diagnose GOC, and a careful long-term follow-up is advocated.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oral Pathology and Microbiology, M.A. Rangoonwala College of Dental Sciences and Research Centre, Azam Campus, Pune, Maharashtra, India.

ABSTRACT
Glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) is a rare and uncommon jaw bone cyst of odontogenic origin described in 1987 by Gardener et al. as a distinct entity. It is a cyst having an unpredictable, potentially aggressive behavior, and has the propensity to grow in large size with relatively high recurrence rate. It poses a diagnostic challenge as it can be clinically and histopathologically confused with lateral periodontal cyst, botryoid odontogenic cyst, radicular and residual cysts with mucous metaplasia, and low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma. The present case report describes GOC in both male and female patients with intra-oral swelling following extraction of 36 and 46, respectively. Careful histopathological examination is needed to diagnose GOC, and a careful long-term follow-up is advocated.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus