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A brief qualitative survey on the utilization of Yoga research resources by Yoga teachers.

Bhavanani AB - J Intercult Ethnopharmacol (2016)

Bottom Line: About 60% felt these studies helped them in general teaching whereas 20% said that such studies had not really influenced it in any way.Though a majority agree research is important, few seriously update themselves on this through scientific channels.With regard to future studies, most wanted "proof" that could be used to convince potential clients and felt that more qualitative methods should be applied.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Yoga Therapy, Education and Research, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth University, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pillayarkuppam, Pondicherry, India.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Yoga has become popular worldwide with increasing research done on its therapeutic potential. However, it remains to be determined whether such findings actually percolate down into teaching and practice of Yoga teachers/therapists.

Materials and methods: The aim of this survey was to document awareness of Yoga research findings in the Yoga community and find out how these were utilized. It was undertaken with a select group of 34 international Yoga teachers and therapists utilizing email and social media between August and December 2015. Majority of responders had well-established reputation in Yoga and were from diverse lineages with 30 of them having more than 5 years of experience in the field. A set of eight questions were sent to them related to essentiality of Yoga research, how they updated themselves on research findings and whether such studies influenced their teaching and practice. Responses were compiled and appropriate statistics determined for quantitative aspects while feedback, comments and suggestions were noted in detail.

Results and discussion: About 89% agreed that it was essential to be up-to-date on Yoga research but only 70% updated themselves regularly with average papers read fully per year being <10. Most accessed information through general news reports, emails from contacts, and articles on internet sites whereas only 7% were through PubMed. About 60% felt these studies helped them in general teaching whereas 20% said that such studies had not really influenced it in any way.

Conclusion: This survey provides a basic picture of a general lack of awareness of Yoga research amongst practicing Yoga teachers and therapists. Though a majority agree research is important, few seriously update themselves on this through scientific channels. With regard to future studies, most wanted "proof" that could be used to convince potential clients and felt that more qualitative methods should be applied.

No MeSH data available.


© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
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A brief qualitative survey on the utilization of Yoga research resources by Yoga teachers.

Bhavanani AB - J Intercult Ethnopharmacol (2016)

© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835992&req=5

Bottom Line: About 60% felt these studies helped them in general teaching whereas 20% said that such studies had not really influenced it in any way.Though a majority agree research is important, few seriously update themselves on this through scientific channels.With regard to future studies, most wanted "proof" that could be used to convince potential clients and felt that more qualitative methods should be applied.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Yoga Therapy, Education and Research, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth University, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pillayarkuppam, Pondicherry, India.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Yoga has become popular worldwide with increasing research done on its therapeutic potential. However, it remains to be determined whether such findings actually percolate down into teaching and practice of Yoga teachers/therapists.

Materials and methods: The aim of this survey was to document awareness of Yoga research findings in the Yoga community and find out how these were utilized. It was undertaken with a select group of 34 international Yoga teachers and therapists utilizing email and social media between August and December 2015. Majority of responders had well-established reputation in Yoga and were from diverse lineages with 30 of them having more than 5 years of experience in the field. A set of eight questions were sent to them related to essentiality of Yoga research, how they updated themselves on research findings and whether such studies influenced their teaching and practice. Responses were compiled and appropriate statistics determined for quantitative aspects while feedback, comments and suggestions were noted in detail.

Results and discussion: About 89% agreed that it was essential to be up-to-date on Yoga research but only 70% updated themselves regularly with average papers read fully per year being <10. Most accessed information through general news reports, emails from contacts, and articles on internet sites whereas only 7% were through PubMed. About 60% felt these studies helped them in general teaching whereas 20% said that such studies had not really influenced it in any way.

Conclusion: This survey provides a basic picture of a general lack of awareness of Yoga research amongst practicing Yoga teachers and therapists. Though a majority agree research is important, few seriously update themselves on this through scientific channels. With regard to future studies, most wanted "proof" that could be used to convince potential clients and felt that more qualitative methods should be applied.

No MeSH data available.