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Mechanisms regulating proteostasis are involved in sympatric speciation of the blind mole rat, Spalax galili.

Rodriguez KA, Li K, Nevo E, Buffenstein R - Autophagy (2016)

Bottom Line: Genome-wide analysis demonstrates extensive genomic adaptive complexes involved in sympatric speciation between blind mole rats (Spalax galili) in abutting populations living in basalt and chalk soils.Among the gene ontology (GO) enrichment, musculature and metabolism stood out in basalt dwellers while nutrition and neurogenetics were highlighted in chalk residents.Measurements of mechanisms regulating protein homeostasis inspired by these GO terms suggest that at the proteomic level there is also a habitat/soil-type driven divergence with the basalt residents exhibiting higher proteasome activity whereas elevated levels of markers of autophagy are evident in the chalk inhabitants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a Sam and Anne Barshop Center for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) , San Antonio , TX , USA.

ABSTRACT
Genome-wide analysis demonstrates extensive genomic adaptive complexes involved in sympatric speciation between blind mole rats (Spalax galili) in abutting populations living in basalt and chalk soils. Among the gene ontology (GO) enrichment, musculature and metabolism stood out in basalt dwellers while nutrition and neurogenetics were highlighted in chalk residents. Measurements of mechanisms regulating protein homeostasis inspired by these GO terms suggest that at the proteomic level there is also a habitat/soil-type driven divergence with the basalt residents exhibiting higher proteasome activity whereas elevated levels of markers of autophagy are evident in the chalk inhabitants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Can changes in gene expression lead to differences in the proteolytic machinery and species divergence between Spalax galili chalk and basalt populations? Population divergence of Spalax galili originated between 200,000 to 400,000 y ago with the chalk population as the ancestor. This divergence is reflected in the genome. Gene ontology (GO) analysis suggested enrichment of genes involved in lipid metabolism in chalk populations and enrichment of genes involved in muscle remodeling and phosphate metabolism for basalt populations. These GO terms in turn could relate to the different phenotypes seen in degradation processes connected to these ontologies: lipid metabolism to autophagy, and muscle remodeling and phosphate metabolism to proteasome degradation.
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f0001: Can changes in gene expression lead to differences in the proteolytic machinery and species divergence between Spalax galili chalk and basalt populations? Population divergence of Spalax galili originated between 200,000 to 400,000 y ago with the chalk population as the ancestor. This divergence is reflected in the genome. Gene ontology (GO) analysis suggested enrichment of genes involved in lipid metabolism in chalk populations and enrichment of genes involved in muscle remodeling and phosphate metabolism for basalt populations. These GO terms in turn could relate to the different phenotypes seen in degradation processes connected to these ontologies: lipid metabolism to autophagy, and muscle remodeling and phosphate metabolism to proteasome degradation.

Mentions: The GO terms enriched in the genomic analyses point toward these possibilities. The chalk dwelling population, living in a nutrition-compromised environment with low food resources showed enrichment for lipid metabolism, including lipid transport, and homeostasis. In the basalt-dwelling population, enrichment of genes associated with muscle remodeling, which is dependent on proper proteasome function, could have been instigated by greater digging in the harder basalt soil (Fig. 1). Likewise, the sensory related G-protein coupled receptor genes enriched in the basalt mole rat population could be another substrate target of proteasome-mediated degradation. These genes important both in skeletal muscle repair and sensory function could have been selected to allow these animals, dwelling in the basalt soil to adapt better to their new environment.Figure 1.


Mechanisms regulating proteostasis are involved in sympatric speciation of the blind mole rat, Spalax galili.

Rodriguez KA, Li K, Nevo E, Buffenstein R - Autophagy (2016)

Can changes in gene expression lead to differences in the proteolytic machinery and species divergence between Spalax galili chalk and basalt populations? Population divergence of Spalax galili originated between 200,000 to 400,000 y ago with the chalk population as the ancestor. This divergence is reflected in the genome. Gene ontology (GO) analysis suggested enrichment of genes involved in lipid metabolism in chalk populations and enrichment of genes involved in muscle remodeling and phosphate metabolism for basalt populations. These GO terms in turn could relate to the different phenotypes seen in degradation processes connected to these ontologies: lipid metabolism to autophagy, and muscle remodeling and phosphate metabolism to proteasome degradation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835961&req=5

f0001: Can changes in gene expression lead to differences in the proteolytic machinery and species divergence between Spalax galili chalk and basalt populations? Population divergence of Spalax galili originated between 200,000 to 400,000 y ago with the chalk population as the ancestor. This divergence is reflected in the genome. Gene ontology (GO) analysis suggested enrichment of genes involved in lipid metabolism in chalk populations and enrichment of genes involved in muscle remodeling and phosphate metabolism for basalt populations. These GO terms in turn could relate to the different phenotypes seen in degradation processes connected to these ontologies: lipid metabolism to autophagy, and muscle remodeling and phosphate metabolism to proteasome degradation.
Mentions: The GO terms enriched in the genomic analyses point toward these possibilities. The chalk dwelling population, living in a nutrition-compromised environment with low food resources showed enrichment for lipid metabolism, including lipid transport, and homeostasis. In the basalt-dwelling population, enrichment of genes associated with muscle remodeling, which is dependent on proper proteasome function, could have been instigated by greater digging in the harder basalt soil (Fig. 1). Likewise, the sensory related G-protein coupled receptor genes enriched in the basalt mole rat population could be another substrate target of proteasome-mediated degradation. These genes important both in skeletal muscle repair and sensory function could have been selected to allow these animals, dwelling in the basalt soil to adapt better to their new environment.Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Genome-wide analysis demonstrates extensive genomic adaptive complexes involved in sympatric speciation between blind mole rats (Spalax galili) in abutting populations living in basalt and chalk soils.Among the gene ontology (GO) enrichment, musculature and metabolism stood out in basalt dwellers while nutrition and neurogenetics were highlighted in chalk residents.Measurements of mechanisms regulating protein homeostasis inspired by these GO terms suggest that at the proteomic level there is also a habitat/soil-type driven divergence with the basalt residents exhibiting higher proteasome activity whereas elevated levels of markers of autophagy are evident in the chalk inhabitants.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: a Sam and Anne Barshop Center for Longevity and Aging Studies, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA) , San Antonio , TX , USA.

ABSTRACT
Genome-wide analysis demonstrates extensive genomic adaptive complexes involved in sympatric speciation between blind mole rats (Spalax galili) in abutting populations living in basalt and chalk soils. Among the gene ontology (GO) enrichment, musculature and metabolism stood out in basalt dwellers while nutrition and neurogenetics were highlighted in chalk residents. Measurements of mechanisms regulating protein homeostasis inspired by these GO terms suggest that at the proteomic level there is also a habitat/soil-type driven divergence with the basalt residents exhibiting higher proteasome activity whereas elevated levels of markers of autophagy are evident in the chalk inhabitants.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus