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Bacterial communities in penile skin, male urethra, and vaginas of heterosexual couples with and without bacterial vaginosis.

Zozaya M, Ferris MJ, Siren JD, Lillis R, Myers L, Nsuami MJ, Eren AM, Brown J, Taylor CM, Martin DH - Microbiome (2016)

Bottom Line: Pyrosequencing analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA was used to examine BV-associated bacteria in monogamous couples with and without BV using vaginal, male urethral, and penile skin specimens.The penile skin and urethral microbiota of male partners of women with BV was significantly more similar to the vaginal microbiota of their female partner compared to the vaginal microbiota of non-partner women with BV.Specific BV-associated species were concordant in women with BV and their male partners.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Children's Hospital of New Orleans, 200 Henry Clay Ave., New Orleans, LA, 70118, USA. hinchliffe_mz@jpso.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The epidemiology of bacterial vaginosis (BV) suggests it is sexually transmissible, yet no transmissible agent has been identified. It is probable that BV-associated bacterial communities are transferred from male to female partners during intercourse; however, the microbiota of sexual partners has not been well-studied.

Results: Pyrosequencing analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA was used to examine BV-associated bacteria in monogamous couples with and without BV using vaginal, male urethral, and penile skin specimens. The penile skin and urethral microbiota of male partners of women with BV was significantly more similar to the vaginal microbiota of their female partner compared to the vaginal microbiota of non-partner women with BV. This was not the case for male partners of women with normal vaginal microbiota. Specific BV-associated species were concordant in women with BV and their male partners.

Conclusions: In monogamous heterosexual couples in which the woman has BV, the significantly higher similarity between the vaginal microbiota and the penile skin and urethral microbiota of the male partner, supports the hypothesis that sexual exchange of BV-associated bacterial taxa is common.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) comparing unweighted UniFrac distances between the microbiota of circumcised (red) and uncircumcised (blue) penile skin specimens from males whose partners have BV or normal vaginal microbiota. ANOSIM P values and R statistic are indicated
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Fig2: Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) comparing unweighted UniFrac distances between the microbiota of circumcised (red) and uncircumcised (blue) penile skin specimens from males whose partners have BV or normal vaginal microbiota. ANOSIM P values and R statistic are indicated

Mentions: Principal coordinate analyses showed no clear separation between the penile skin microbiota of circumcised and uncircumcised men, for both BV-males and normal-males (Fig. 2).Fig. 2


Bacterial communities in penile skin, male urethra, and vaginas of heterosexual couples with and without bacterial vaginosis.

Zozaya M, Ferris MJ, Siren JD, Lillis R, Myers L, Nsuami MJ, Eren AM, Brown J, Taylor CM, Martin DH - Microbiome (2016)

Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) comparing unweighted UniFrac distances between the microbiota of circumcised (red) and uncircumcised (blue) penile skin specimens from males whose partners have BV or normal vaginal microbiota. ANOSIM P values and R statistic are indicated
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835890&req=5

Fig2: Principal coordinates analysis (PCoA) comparing unweighted UniFrac distances between the microbiota of circumcised (red) and uncircumcised (blue) penile skin specimens from males whose partners have BV or normal vaginal microbiota. ANOSIM P values and R statistic are indicated
Mentions: Principal coordinate analyses showed no clear separation between the penile skin microbiota of circumcised and uncircumcised men, for both BV-males and normal-males (Fig. 2).Fig. 2

Bottom Line: Pyrosequencing analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA was used to examine BV-associated bacteria in monogamous couples with and without BV using vaginal, male urethral, and penile skin specimens.The penile skin and urethral microbiota of male partners of women with BV was significantly more similar to the vaginal microbiota of their female partner compared to the vaginal microbiota of non-partner women with BV.Specific BV-associated species were concordant in women with BV and their male partners.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Children's Hospital of New Orleans, 200 Henry Clay Ave., New Orleans, LA, 70118, USA. hinchliffe_mz@jpso.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: The epidemiology of bacterial vaginosis (BV) suggests it is sexually transmissible, yet no transmissible agent has been identified. It is probable that BV-associated bacterial communities are transferred from male to female partners during intercourse; however, the microbiota of sexual partners has not been well-studied.

Results: Pyrosequencing analysis of PCR-amplified 16S rDNA was used to examine BV-associated bacteria in monogamous couples with and without BV using vaginal, male urethral, and penile skin specimens. The penile skin and urethral microbiota of male partners of women with BV was significantly more similar to the vaginal microbiota of their female partner compared to the vaginal microbiota of non-partner women with BV. This was not the case for male partners of women with normal vaginal microbiota. Specific BV-associated species were concordant in women with BV and their male partners.

Conclusions: In monogamous heterosexual couples in which the woman has BV, the significantly higher similarity between the vaginal microbiota and the penile skin and urethral microbiota of the male partner, supports the hypothesis that sexual exchange of BV-associated bacterial taxa is common.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus