Limits...
Blood meal sources of wild and domestic Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in Bolivia: connectivity between cycles of transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi.

Buitrago R, Bosseno MF, Depickère S, Waleckx E, Salas R, Aliaga C, Barnabé C, Brenière SF - Parasit Vectors (2016)

Bottom Line: Interestingly, blood from wild animals was identified in triatomines captured in the peridomestic and domestic environment, and blood from domestic animals was found in triatomines captured in the wild, revealing links between wild and domestic cycles of T. cruzi transmission.The current study suggests that wild T. infestans attack humans in the wild, but is also able to bite humans in domestic settings before going back to its natural environment.These results support the risk to human health posed by wild populations of T. infestans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: IRD, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, UMR INTERTRYP, (IRD-CIRAD), Interactions hôtes-vecteurs-parasites-environnement dans les maladies tropicales négligées dues aux trypanosomatidés, 911 Av. Agropolis, Montpellier, cédex 5, 34394, France. rosiob8@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Chagas disease is a major public health problem in Latin America. Its etiologic agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, is mainly transmitted through the contaminated faeces of blood-sucking insects called triatomines. Triatoma infestans is the main vector in various countries in South America and recently, several foci of wild populations of this species have been described in Bolivia and other countries. These wild populations are suspected of affecting the success of insecticide control campaigns being carried out in South America. To assess the risk that these T. infestans populations pose to human health, it is helpful to determine blood meal sources.

Methods: In the present work, blood meals were identified in various Bolivian wild T. infestans populations and in three specific areas, in both wild and intra-peridomestic populations to assess the links between wild and domestic cycles of T. cruzi transmission. PCR-HDA and sequencing of Cytb gene were used to identify these blood meal sources.

Results and discussion: Fourteen vertebrate species were identified as wild blood meal sources. Of those, the most prevalent species were two Andean endemic rodents, Octodontomys gliroides (36%) and Galea musteloides (30%), while humans were the third most prevalent source (18.7%). Of 163 blood meals from peridomestic areas, more than half were chickens, and the others were generally domestic animals or humans. Interestingly, blood from wild animals was identified in triatomines captured in the peridomestic and domestic environment, and blood from domestic animals was found in triatomines captured in the wild, revealing links between wild and domestic cycles of T. cruzi transmission.

Conclusion: The current study suggests that wild T. infestans attack humans in the wild, but is also able to bite humans in domestic settings before going back to its natural environment. These results support the risk to human health posed by wild populations of T. infestans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Acrylamide electrophoresis gel showing PCR-HDA patterns of DNA samples obtained from intestinal contents of wild T. infestans: lane 1, molecular weight; lanes 3 and 12, P2 HDA pattern (G. musteloides); lanes 5 and 11, P1 HDA pattern (O. gliroides); lanes 6, 7 and 8, P7 HDA pattern (G. musteloides); lane 9, P12 HDA pattern (A. glaucinus); lanes 10 and 16, P6 HDA pattern (O. gliroides); lanes 13, 14 and 15, P5 HDA pattern (G. gallus); lanes 2 and 4, multibanding patterns corresponding to multiple meals
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835887&req=5

Fig1: Acrylamide electrophoresis gel showing PCR-HDA patterns of DNA samples obtained from intestinal contents of wild T. infestans: lane 1, molecular weight; lanes 3 and 12, P2 HDA pattern (G. musteloides); lanes 5 and 11, P1 HDA pattern (O. gliroides); lanes 6, 7 and 8, P7 HDA pattern (G. musteloides); lane 9, P12 HDA pattern (A. glaucinus); lanes 10 and 16, P6 HDA pattern (O. gliroides); lanes 13, 14 and 15, P5 HDA pattern (G. gallus); lanes 2 and 4, multibanding patterns corresponding to multiple meals

Mentions: The intestinal contents of 618 wild T. infestans captured in Andean Dry Forests, Prepuna and Gran Chaco eco regions were processed. Positive PCR (meaning that DNA from a vertebrate was present) was obtained for 371 samples, and the blood meal sources were identified for 144 samples (23.3 %) (Table 1). Multi-banding HDA patterns characteristic of multiple blood meal sources were observed for 32 other samples (8.6 %). The remaining 195 samples, including 10 from the Gran Chaco eco region, presented insufficient PCR products to obtain heteroduplex formation or for direct sequencing. The overall identified HDA patterns (144) were composed of two bands characteristic of the formation of the heteroduplex molecules. A total of 18 different heteroduplex patterns (P1 to P18) were identified. Seven of them plus two patterns of multiple banding are illustrated in Fig. 1.Fig. 1


Blood meal sources of wild and domestic Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) in Bolivia: connectivity between cycles of transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi.

Buitrago R, Bosseno MF, Depickère S, Waleckx E, Salas R, Aliaga C, Barnabé C, Brenière SF - Parasit Vectors (2016)

Acrylamide electrophoresis gel showing PCR-HDA patterns of DNA samples obtained from intestinal contents of wild T. infestans: lane 1, molecular weight; lanes 3 and 12, P2 HDA pattern (G. musteloides); lanes 5 and 11, P1 HDA pattern (O. gliroides); lanes 6, 7 and 8, P7 HDA pattern (G. musteloides); lane 9, P12 HDA pattern (A. glaucinus); lanes 10 and 16, P6 HDA pattern (O. gliroides); lanes 13, 14 and 15, P5 HDA pattern (G. gallus); lanes 2 and 4, multibanding patterns corresponding to multiple meals
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835887&req=5

Fig1: Acrylamide electrophoresis gel showing PCR-HDA patterns of DNA samples obtained from intestinal contents of wild T. infestans: lane 1, molecular weight; lanes 3 and 12, P2 HDA pattern (G. musteloides); lanes 5 and 11, P1 HDA pattern (O. gliroides); lanes 6, 7 and 8, P7 HDA pattern (G. musteloides); lane 9, P12 HDA pattern (A. glaucinus); lanes 10 and 16, P6 HDA pattern (O. gliroides); lanes 13, 14 and 15, P5 HDA pattern (G. gallus); lanes 2 and 4, multibanding patterns corresponding to multiple meals
Mentions: The intestinal contents of 618 wild T. infestans captured in Andean Dry Forests, Prepuna and Gran Chaco eco regions were processed. Positive PCR (meaning that DNA from a vertebrate was present) was obtained for 371 samples, and the blood meal sources were identified for 144 samples (23.3 %) (Table 1). Multi-banding HDA patterns characteristic of multiple blood meal sources were observed for 32 other samples (8.6 %). The remaining 195 samples, including 10 from the Gran Chaco eco region, presented insufficient PCR products to obtain heteroduplex formation or for direct sequencing. The overall identified HDA patterns (144) were composed of two bands characteristic of the formation of the heteroduplex molecules. A total of 18 different heteroduplex patterns (P1 to P18) were identified. Seven of them plus two patterns of multiple banding are illustrated in Fig. 1.Fig. 1

Bottom Line: Interestingly, blood from wild animals was identified in triatomines captured in the peridomestic and domestic environment, and blood from domestic animals was found in triatomines captured in the wild, revealing links between wild and domestic cycles of T. cruzi transmission.The current study suggests that wild T. infestans attack humans in the wild, but is also able to bite humans in domestic settings before going back to its natural environment.These results support the risk to human health posed by wild populations of T. infestans.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: IRD, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, UMR INTERTRYP, (IRD-CIRAD), Interactions hôtes-vecteurs-parasites-environnement dans les maladies tropicales négligées dues aux trypanosomatidés, 911 Av. Agropolis, Montpellier, cédex 5, 34394, France. rosiob8@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: Chagas disease is a major public health problem in Latin America. Its etiologic agent, Trypanosoma cruzi, is mainly transmitted through the contaminated faeces of blood-sucking insects called triatomines. Triatoma infestans is the main vector in various countries in South America and recently, several foci of wild populations of this species have been described in Bolivia and other countries. These wild populations are suspected of affecting the success of insecticide control campaigns being carried out in South America. To assess the risk that these T. infestans populations pose to human health, it is helpful to determine blood meal sources.

Methods: In the present work, blood meals were identified in various Bolivian wild T. infestans populations and in three specific areas, in both wild and intra-peridomestic populations to assess the links between wild and domestic cycles of T. cruzi transmission. PCR-HDA and sequencing of Cytb gene were used to identify these blood meal sources.

Results and discussion: Fourteen vertebrate species were identified as wild blood meal sources. Of those, the most prevalent species were two Andean endemic rodents, Octodontomys gliroides (36%) and Galea musteloides (30%), while humans were the third most prevalent source (18.7%). Of 163 blood meals from peridomestic areas, more than half were chickens, and the others were generally domestic animals or humans. Interestingly, blood from wild animals was identified in triatomines captured in the peridomestic and domestic environment, and blood from domestic animals was found in triatomines captured in the wild, revealing links between wild and domestic cycles of T. cruzi transmission.

Conclusion: The current study suggests that wild T. infestans attack humans in the wild, but is also able to bite humans in domestic settings before going back to its natural environment. These results support the risk to human health posed by wild populations of T. infestans.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus