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De novo glioblastoma in the territory of a recent middle cerebral artery infarction and a residual meningioma: pathogenesis revisited.

Yaghmour W, Kurdi ME, Baeesa SS - World J Surg Oncol (2016)

Bottom Line: We are reporting a 32-year-old male who developed left middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction as a surgical complication for sphenoid meningioma.He developed recurrent symptoms 4 months later due to development of a glioblastoma adjacent to both the territory of the prior MCA infarct and the residual meningioma.This case adds further contribution to the literature of the possible pathological association between glioblastoma and brain infarction on a background of meningioma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80215, Jeddah, 21589, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT

Background: The pathogenesis of glioblastoma is complex, and the implicated molecular mechanisms are yet to be understood. There are scattered reports describing a possible relationship between meningioma and glioblastoma and more rarely a relationship between infarction and glioblastoma.

Case presentation: We are reporting a 32-year-old male who developed left middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction as a surgical complication for sphenoid meningioma. He developed recurrent symptoms 4 months later due to development of a glioblastoma adjacent to both the territory of the prior MCA infarct and the residual meningioma.

Conclusions: This case adds further contribution to the literature of the possible pathological association between glioblastoma and brain infarction on a background of meningioma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Tumor cells are highlighted with glial acidic fibrillary protein staining (×40)
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Fig7: Tumor cells are highlighted with glial acidic fibrillary protein staining (×40)

Mentions: H & E stain revealed a highly cellular malignant glial neoplasm with endothelial proliferation and geographical and pseudopalisading necrosis; findings are consistent with glioblastoma (Fig. 6). There were marked mitotic figures which were apparent. The neoplastic cells are embedded in thickened fibrillary stroma, the latter highlighted with glial acidic fibrillary protein (GFAP) (Fig. 7). Tumor cells are positive for P53 (Fig. 8) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH-1) (Fig. 9) immunolabelings. Tumor cells were found to be negative for reticulin and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). The Ki-67 proliferative index is estimated to be 5–10 % in focal areas (Fig. 10).Fig. 6


De novo glioblastoma in the territory of a recent middle cerebral artery infarction and a residual meningioma: pathogenesis revisited.

Yaghmour W, Kurdi ME, Baeesa SS - World J Surg Oncol (2016)

Tumor cells are highlighted with glial acidic fibrillary protein staining (×40)
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835844&req=5

Fig7: Tumor cells are highlighted with glial acidic fibrillary protein staining (×40)
Mentions: H & E stain revealed a highly cellular malignant glial neoplasm with endothelial proliferation and geographical and pseudopalisading necrosis; findings are consistent with glioblastoma (Fig. 6). There were marked mitotic figures which were apparent. The neoplastic cells are embedded in thickened fibrillary stroma, the latter highlighted with glial acidic fibrillary protein (GFAP) (Fig. 7). Tumor cells are positive for P53 (Fig. 8) and isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH-1) (Fig. 9) immunolabelings. Tumor cells were found to be negative for reticulin and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). The Ki-67 proliferative index is estimated to be 5–10 % in focal areas (Fig. 10).Fig. 6

Bottom Line: We are reporting a 32-year-old male who developed left middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction as a surgical complication for sphenoid meningioma.He developed recurrent symptoms 4 months later due to development of a glioblastoma adjacent to both the territory of the prior MCA infarct and the residual meningioma.This case adds further contribution to the literature of the possible pathological association between glioblastoma and brain infarction on a background of meningioma.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdulaziz University, P.O. Box 80215, Jeddah, 21589, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT

Background: The pathogenesis of glioblastoma is complex, and the implicated molecular mechanisms are yet to be understood. There are scattered reports describing a possible relationship between meningioma and glioblastoma and more rarely a relationship between infarction and glioblastoma.

Case presentation: We are reporting a 32-year-old male who developed left middle cerebral artery (MCA) infarction as a surgical complication for sphenoid meningioma. He developed recurrent symptoms 4 months later due to development of a glioblastoma adjacent to both the territory of the prior MCA infarct and the residual meningioma.

Conclusions: This case adds further contribution to the literature of the possible pathological association between glioblastoma and brain infarction on a background of meningioma.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus