Limits...
Bioprinting three-dimensional cell-laden tissue constructs with controllable degradation.

Wu Z, Su X, Xu Y, Kong B, Sun W, Mi S - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: However, the printed cells in this hydrogel could not degrade the surrounding alginate gel matrix, causing them to remain in a poorly proliferating and non-differentiating state.The 3D-printed hydrogel network with interconnected channels and a macroporous structure was stable and achieved high cell viability (over 90%).Cell proliferation and specific marker protein expression results also revealed that with the help of sodium citrate degradation, the printed HCECs showed a higher proliferation rate and greater cytokeratin 3(CK3) expression, indicating that this newly developed method may help to improve the alginate bioink system for the application of 3D bioprinting in tissue engineering.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomanufacturing Engineering Laboratory, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Alginate hydrogel is a popular biologically inert material that is widely used in 3D bioprinting, especially in extrusion-based printing. However, the printed cells in this hydrogel could not degrade the surrounding alginate gel matrix, causing them to remain in a poorly proliferating and non-differentiating state. Here, we report a novel study of the 3D printing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs)/collagen/gelatin/alginate hydrogel incubated with a medium containing sodium citrate to obtain degradation-controllable cell-laden tissue constructs. The 3D-printed hydrogel network with interconnected channels and a macroporous structure was stable and achieved high cell viability (over 90%). By altering the mole ratio of sodium citrate/sodium alginate, the degradation time of the bioprinting constructs can be controlled. Cell proliferation and specific marker protein expression results also revealed that with the help of sodium citrate degradation, the printed HCECs showed a higher proliferation rate and greater cytokeratin 3(CK3) expression, indicating that this newly developed method may help to improve the alginate bioink system for the application of 3D bioprinting in tissue engineering.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Cell viability after printing by live/dead staining (scale bar, 500 μm).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835808&req=5

f4: Cell viability after printing by live/dead staining (scale bar, 500 μm).

Mentions: To print the cell-laden gelatin/alginate/collagen gel, one important criterion is that the material should come out of the nozzle with minimum applied shear force. Otherwise, the applied shear force may damage the cells and reduce the cell viability in the printed constructs111. We checked the cell viability using the live/dead assay that can be imaged in the printed construct after 3D printing. As shown in Fig. 4, there was minimal cell death caused by the printing process, and the viability of HCECs in the printed construct was found to be 94.6 ± 2.5%. Thus, the printing cell-laden materials and parameters used in this experiment did not have any harmful effect on the encapsulated cells and can support cell viability without disruption of the constructs. Although the long-term stability of the constructs during the culture time in the medium is a requirement for potential applications in 3D tissue regeneration, alginate’s nondegradable property also negatively affects bioprinted cell behaviour and tissue formation16.


Bioprinting three-dimensional cell-laden tissue constructs with controllable degradation.

Wu Z, Su X, Xu Y, Kong B, Sun W, Mi S - Sci Rep (2016)

Cell viability after printing by live/dead staining (scale bar, 500 μm).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835808&req=5

f4: Cell viability after printing by live/dead staining (scale bar, 500 μm).
Mentions: To print the cell-laden gelatin/alginate/collagen gel, one important criterion is that the material should come out of the nozzle with minimum applied shear force. Otherwise, the applied shear force may damage the cells and reduce the cell viability in the printed constructs111. We checked the cell viability using the live/dead assay that can be imaged in the printed construct after 3D printing. As shown in Fig. 4, there was minimal cell death caused by the printing process, and the viability of HCECs in the printed construct was found to be 94.6 ± 2.5%. Thus, the printing cell-laden materials and parameters used in this experiment did not have any harmful effect on the encapsulated cells and can support cell viability without disruption of the constructs. Although the long-term stability of the constructs during the culture time in the medium is a requirement for potential applications in 3D tissue regeneration, alginate’s nondegradable property also negatively affects bioprinted cell behaviour and tissue formation16.

Bottom Line: However, the printed cells in this hydrogel could not degrade the surrounding alginate gel matrix, causing them to remain in a poorly proliferating and non-differentiating state.The 3D-printed hydrogel network with interconnected channels and a macroporous structure was stable and achieved high cell viability (over 90%).Cell proliferation and specific marker protein expression results also revealed that with the help of sodium citrate degradation, the printed HCECs showed a higher proliferation rate and greater cytokeratin 3(CK3) expression, indicating that this newly developed method may help to improve the alginate bioink system for the application of 3D bioprinting in tissue engineering.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Biomanufacturing Engineering Laboratory, Graduate School at Shenzhen, Tsinghua University, Shenzhen, P.R. China.

ABSTRACT
Alginate hydrogel is a popular biologically inert material that is widely used in 3D bioprinting, especially in extrusion-based printing. However, the printed cells in this hydrogel could not degrade the surrounding alginate gel matrix, causing them to remain in a poorly proliferating and non-differentiating state. Here, we report a novel study of the 3D printing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs)/collagen/gelatin/alginate hydrogel incubated with a medium containing sodium citrate to obtain degradation-controllable cell-laden tissue constructs. The 3D-printed hydrogel network with interconnected channels and a macroporous structure was stable and achieved high cell viability (over 90%). By altering the mole ratio of sodium citrate/sodium alginate, the degradation time of the bioprinting constructs can be controlled. Cell proliferation and specific marker protein expression results also revealed that with the help of sodium citrate degradation, the printed HCECs showed a higher proliferation rate and greater cytokeratin 3(CK3) expression, indicating that this newly developed method may help to improve the alginate bioink system for the application of 3D bioprinting in tissue engineering.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus