Limits...
Health Effects of PCBs in Residences and Schools (HESPERUS): PCB - health Cohort Profile.

Bräuner EV, Andersen ZJ, Frederiksen M, Specht IO, Hougaard KS, Ebbehøj N, Bailey J, Giwercman A, Steenland K, Longnecker MP, Bonde JP - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Polychlorinated-biphenyls (PCBs) were introduced in the late 1920s and used until the 1970s when they were banned in most countries due to evidence of environmental build-up and possible adverse health effects.The cohorts will be linked to eight different national data sources on mortality, school records, residential history, socioeconomic status, and chronic disease and reproductive outcomes.We describe a project, called HESPERUS (Health Effects of PCBs in Residences and Schools), which will be the first study of the long term health effects of the lower-chlorinated, semi-volatile PCBs in the indoor environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Center of Prevention and Health, Center of Health, Capital region of Denmark, Rigshospital - Glostrup, Copenhagen University, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Polychlorinated-biphenyls (PCBs) were introduced in the late 1920s and used until the 1970s when they were banned in most countries due to evidence of environmental build-up and possible adverse health effects. However they still persist in the environment, indoors and in humans. Indoor air in contaminated buildings may confer airborne exposure markedly above background regional PCB levels. To date, no epidemiological studies have assessed the health effects from exposure to semi-volatile PCBs in the indoor environment. Indoor air PCBs are generally less chlorinated than PCBs that are absorbed via the diet, or via past occupational exposure; therefore their health effects require separate risk assessment. Two separate cohorts of individuals who have either attended schools (n = 66,769; 26% exposed) or lived in apartment buildings (n = 37,185; 19% exposed), where indoor air PCB concentrations have been measured were created. An individual estimate of long-term airborne PCB exposure was assigned based on measurements. The cohorts will be linked to eight different national data sources on mortality, school records, residential history, socioeconomic status, and chronic disease and reproductive outcomes. The linking of indoor air exposures with health outcomes provides a dataset unprecedented worldwide. We describe a project, called HESPERUS (Health Effects of PCBs in Residences and Schools), which will be the first study of the long term health effects of the lower-chlorinated, semi-volatile PCBs in the indoor environment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Nationwide registers pertinent to HESPERUS outcomes and variable output.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835792&req=5

f3: Nationwide registers pertinent to HESPERUS outcomes and variable output.

Mentions: Eight different national data sources will be employed to gather information on vital status (birth, death, emigration), cognitive function, school attendance, residential address history, socio-economic status as well as health and reproductive outcomes (Fig. 3), including the: Danish Civil Registration System, the Taxation Registry, Danish Conscription Database, Danish Student Register, Danish National Patient Register, Danish National Prescription Registry, Danish National Diabetes Register, Danish Cancer Registry, and Medical Birth Register. All linkage and statistical analyses will occur within Statistics Denmark, a governmental institution that collects and maintains electronic records for a broad spectrum of statistical and scientific purposes. Data will be stored on the Statistics Denmark platform and confidentiality is ensured by several layers of password-protected sign-in including the use of a real-time password assigned by a remote token and the use of de-identified data. Researchers can see and analyse data when logged in but cannot extract data from Statistics Denmark and only the outputs of the analyses are available.


Health Effects of PCBs in Residences and Schools (HESPERUS): PCB - health Cohort Profile.

Bräuner EV, Andersen ZJ, Frederiksen M, Specht IO, Hougaard KS, Ebbehøj N, Bailey J, Giwercman A, Steenland K, Longnecker MP, Bonde JP - Sci Rep (2016)

Nationwide registers pertinent to HESPERUS outcomes and variable output.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835792&req=5

f3: Nationwide registers pertinent to HESPERUS outcomes and variable output.
Mentions: Eight different national data sources will be employed to gather information on vital status (birth, death, emigration), cognitive function, school attendance, residential address history, socio-economic status as well as health and reproductive outcomes (Fig. 3), including the: Danish Civil Registration System, the Taxation Registry, Danish Conscription Database, Danish Student Register, Danish National Patient Register, Danish National Prescription Registry, Danish National Diabetes Register, Danish Cancer Registry, and Medical Birth Register. All linkage and statistical analyses will occur within Statistics Denmark, a governmental institution that collects and maintains electronic records for a broad spectrum of statistical and scientific purposes. Data will be stored on the Statistics Denmark platform and confidentiality is ensured by several layers of password-protected sign-in including the use of a real-time password assigned by a remote token and the use of de-identified data. Researchers can see and analyse data when logged in but cannot extract data from Statistics Denmark and only the outputs of the analyses are available.

Bottom Line: Polychlorinated-biphenyls (PCBs) were introduced in the late 1920s and used until the 1970s when they were banned in most countries due to evidence of environmental build-up and possible adverse health effects.The cohorts will be linked to eight different national data sources on mortality, school records, residential history, socioeconomic status, and chronic disease and reproductive outcomes.We describe a project, called HESPERUS (Health Effects of PCBs in Residences and Schools), which will be the first study of the long term health effects of the lower-chlorinated, semi-volatile PCBs in the indoor environment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Research Center of Prevention and Health, Center of Health, Capital region of Denmark, Rigshospital - Glostrup, Copenhagen University, Denmark.

ABSTRACT
Polychlorinated-biphenyls (PCBs) were introduced in the late 1920s and used until the 1970s when they were banned in most countries due to evidence of environmental build-up and possible adverse health effects. However they still persist in the environment, indoors and in humans. Indoor air in contaminated buildings may confer airborne exposure markedly above background regional PCB levels. To date, no epidemiological studies have assessed the health effects from exposure to semi-volatile PCBs in the indoor environment. Indoor air PCBs are generally less chlorinated than PCBs that are absorbed via the diet, or via past occupational exposure; therefore their health effects require separate risk assessment. Two separate cohorts of individuals who have either attended schools (n = 66,769; 26% exposed) or lived in apartment buildings (n = 37,185; 19% exposed), where indoor air PCB concentrations have been measured were created. An individual estimate of long-term airborne PCB exposure was assigned based on measurements. The cohorts will be linked to eight different national data sources on mortality, school records, residential history, socioeconomic status, and chronic disease and reproductive outcomes. The linking of indoor air exposures with health outcomes provides a dataset unprecedented worldwide. We describe a project, called HESPERUS (Health Effects of PCBs in Residences and Schools), which will be the first study of the long term health effects of the lower-chlorinated, semi-volatile PCBs in the indoor environment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus