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Increased frequency of social interaction is associated with enjoyment enhancement and reward system activation.

Kawamichi H, Sugawara SK, Hamano YH, Makita K, Kochiyama T, Sadato N - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Enjoyment of feelings associated through social interaction motivates humans to build social connections according to their personal preferences.Furthermore, ventral striatal activation covaried with individual participants' preference for interactions with others.These findings suggest that an elevated frequency of social interaction is represented as a social reward, which might motivate individuals to promote social interaction in a manner that is modulated by personal preference.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo, 116-8551 Japan.

ABSTRACT
Positive social interactions contribute to the sense that one's life has meaning. Enjoyment of feelings associated through social interaction motivates humans to build social connections according to their personal preferences. Therefore, we hypothesized that social interaction itself activates the reward system in a manner that depends upon individual interaction preferences. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in which 38 participants played a virtual ball-toss game in which the number of ball tosses to the participant was either similar to (normal-frequency condition) or higher than (high-frequency condition) the number of tosses to the other players. Participants reported greater-than-anticipated enjoyment during the high-frequency condition, suggesting that receiving a social reward led to unexpected positive feelings. Consistent with this, the high-frequency condition produced stronger activation in the ventral striatum, which is part of the reward system, and the precuneus, representing positive self-image, which might be translated to social reward. Furthermore, ventral striatal activation covaried with individual participants' preference for interactions with others. These findings suggest that an elevated frequency of social interaction is represented as a social reward, which might motivate individuals to promote social interaction in a manner that is modulated by personal preference.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Significant cluster in the precuneus.(A) The significant cluster in the precuneus is shown. The activation was thresholded at a voxel-level uncorrected p < 0.005 and a cluster level family-wise error (FWE) corrected p < 0.05. (B) Average beta values in the significant cluster related to the high-frequency effects (high-frequency – normal-frequency) during the ball-toss run (“Toss”) and the button-press run (“Press”) are shown. a.u., arbitrary units.
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f4: Significant cluster in the precuneus.(A) The significant cluster in the precuneus is shown. The activation was thresholded at a voxel-level uncorrected p < 0.005 and a cluster level family-wise error (FWE) corrected p < 0.05. (B) Average beta values in the significant cluster related to the high-frequency effects (high-frequency – normal-frequency) during the ball-toss run (“Toss”) and the button-press run (“Press”) are shown. a.u., arbitrary units.

Mentions: During the ball-toss runs, there were significant high-frequency effects in the precuneus (cluster peak = [6, −44, 42], partly overlapping with occipital cortex and cingulate cortex) and right ventral striatum (cluster peak = [22, 0, −8]) in comparison with the high-frequency effects during the button-press (Participants were only required to press a button by using similar stimuli presentation program to the ball-toss runs except graphical user interface) runs (ball-toss [high-frequency – normal-frequency] > button-press [high-frequency – normal-frequency]) (Table 1 and Figs 3, 4, 5).


Increased frequency of social interaction is associated with enjoyment enhancement and reward system activation.

Kawamichi H, Sugawara SK, Hamano YH, Makita K, Kochiyama T, Sadato N - Sci Rep (2016)

Significant cluster in the precuneus.(A) The significant cluster in the precuneus is shown. The activation was thresholded at a voxel-level uncorrected p < 0.005 and a cluster level family-wise error (FWE) corrected p < 0.05. (B) Average beta values in the significant cluster related to the high-frequency effects (high-frequency – normal-frequency) during the ball-toss run (“Toss”) and the button-press run (“Press”) are shown. a.u., arbitrary units.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835785&req=5

f4: Significant cluster in the precuneus.(A) The significant cluster in the precuneus is shown. The activation was thresholded at a voxel-level uncorrected p < 0.005 and a cluster level family-wise error (FWE) corrected p < 0.05. (B) Average beta values in the significant cluster related to the high-frequency effects (high-frequency – normal-frequency) during the ball-toss run (“Toss”) and the button-press run (“Press”) are shown. a.u., arbitrary units.
Mentions: During the ball-toss runs, there were significant high-frequency effects in the precuneus (cluster peak = [6, −44, 42], partly overlapping with occipital cortex and cingulate cortex) and right ventral striatum (cluster peak = [22, 0, −8]) in comparison with the high-frequency effects during the button-press (Participants were only required to press a button by using similar stimuli presentation program to the ball-toss runs except graphical user interface) runs (ball-toss [high-frequency – normal-frequency] > button-press [high-frequency – normal-frequency]) (Table 1 and Figs 3, 4, 5).

Bottom Line: Enjoyment of feelings associated through social interaction motivates humans to build social connections according to their personal preferences.Furthermore, ventral striatal activation covaried with individual participants' preference for interactions with others.These findings suggest that an elevated frequency of social interaction is represented as a social reward, which might motivate individuals to promote social interaction in a manner that is modulated by personal preference.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Graduate School of Human Health Sciences, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Tokyo, 116-8551 Japan.

ABSTRACT
Positive social interactions contribute to the sense that one's life has meaning. Enjoyment of feelings associated through social interaction motivates humans to build social connections according to their personal preferences. Therefore, we hypothesized that social interaction itself activates the reward system in a manner that depends upon individual interaction preferences. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study in which 38 participants played a virtual ball-toss game in which the number of ball tosses to the participant was either similar to (normal-frequency condition) or higher than (high-frequency condition) the number of tosses to the other players. Participants reported greater-than-anticipated enjoyment during the high-frequency condition, suggesting that receiving a social reward led to unexpected positive feelings. Consistent with this, the high-frequency condition produced stronger activation in the ventral striatum, which is part of the reward system, and the precuneus, representing positive self-image, which might be translated to social reward. Furthermore, ventral striatal activation covaried with individual participants' preference for interactions with others. These findings suggest that an elevated frequency of social interaction is represented as a social reward, which might motivate individuals to promote social interaction in a manner that is modulated by personal preference.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus