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Mitigating methane emission from paddy soil with rice-straw biochar amendment under projected climate change.

Han X, Sun X, Wang C, Wu M, Dong D, Zhong T, Thies JE, Wu W - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Elevated global temperatures and increased concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere associated with climate change will exert profound effects on rice cropping systems, particularly on their greenhouse gas emitting potential.We examined the ability of rice straw-derived biochar to reduce CH4 emission from paddy soil under elevated temperature and CO2 concentrations expected in the future.Reduced CH4 release was mainly attributable to the decreased activity of methanogens along with the increased CH4 oxidation activity and pmoA gene abundance of methanotrophs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, PR China.

ABSTRACT
Elevated global temperatures and increased concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere associated with climate change will exert profound effects on rice cropping systems, particularly on their greenhouse gas emitting potential. Incorporating biochar into paddy soil has been shown previously to reduce methane (CH4) emission from paddy rice under ambient temperature and CO2. We examined the ability of rice straw-derived biochar to reduce CH4 emission from paddy soil under elevated temperature and CO2 concentrations expected in the future. Adding biochar to paddy soil reduced CH4 emission under ambient conditions and significantly reduced emissions by 39.5% (ranging from 185.4 mg kg(-1) dry weight soil, dws season(-1) to 112.2 mg kg(-1) dws season(-1)) under simultaneously elevated temperature and CO2. Reduced CH4 release was mainly attributable to the decreased activity of methanogens along with the increased CH4 oxidation activity and pmoA gene abundance of methanotrophs. Our findings highlight the valuable services of biochar amendment for CH4 control from paddy soil in a future that will be shaped by climate change.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Abundance of methanogenic 16 S rRNA genes (a) and methanotrophic pmoA genes (b) in the rhizosphere soil at the tillering and heading stages in different treatments. Different letters indicate significant differences between the eight treatments at the same rice stage (p < 0.05). Treatment legend is given in Fig. 1.
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f4: Abundance of methanogenic 16 S rRNA genes (a) and methanotrophic pmoA genes (b) in the rhizosphere soil at the tillering and heading stages in different treatments. Different letters indicate significant differences between the eight treatments at the same rice stage (p < 0.05). Treatment legend is given in Fig. 1.

Mentions: Responses of the copy numbers of methanogenic archaeal 16 S rRNA genes in paddy soil to biochar addition, elevated temperature, elevated CO2, and simultaneously elevated temperature and CO2 are shown in Fig. 4a. At the tillering stage, methanogenic archaeal 16 S rRNA genes abundance from tCK, cCK or tcCK was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than that from CK. Biochar amendment significantly (p < 0.05) increased the copy numbers of 16 S rRNA genes for methanogens at the tilling stage, with the exception of elevated CO2. There were no significant differences in methanogenic archaeal 16 S rRNA genes abundance among paddy soils between BC addition and non-amended treatments at the heading stage.


Mitigating methane emission from paddy soil with rice-straw biochar amendment under projected climate change.

Han X, Sun X, Wang C, Wu M, Dong D, Zhong T, Thies JE, Wu W - Sci Rep (2016)

Abundance of methanogenic 16 S rRNA genes (a) and methanotrophic pmoA genes (b) in the rhizosphere soil at the tillering and heading stages in different treatments. Different letters indicate significant differences between the eight treatments at the same rice stage (p < 0.05). Treatment legend is given in Fig. 1.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835783&req=5

f4: Abundance of methanogenic 16 S rRNA genes (a) and methanotrophic pmoA genes (b) in the rhizosphere soil at the tillering and heading stages in different treatments. Different letters indicate significant differences between the eight treatments at the same rice stage (p < 0.05). Treatment legend is given in Fig. 1.
Mentions: Responses of the copy numbers of methanogenic archaeal 16 S rRNA genes in paddy soil to biochar addition, elevated temperature, elevated CO2, and simultaneously elevated temperature and CO2 are shown in Fig. 4a. At the tillering stage, methanogenic archaeal 16 S rRNA genes abundance from tCK, cCK or tcCK was significantly (p < 0.05) higher than that from CK. Biochar amendment significantly (p < 0.05) increased the copy numbers of 16 S rRNA genes for methanogens at the tilling stage, with the exception of elevated CO2. There were no significant differences in methanogenic archaeal 16 S rRNA genes abundance among paddy soils between BC addition and non-amended treatments at the heading stage.

Bottom Line: Elevated global temperatures and increased concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere associated with climate change will exert profound effects on rice cropping systems, particularly on their greenhouse gas emitting potential.We examined the ability of rice straw-derived biochar to reduce CH4 emission from paddy soil under elevated temperature and CO2 concentrations expected in the future.Reduced CH4 release was mainly attributable to the decreased activity of methanogens along with the increased CH4 oxidation activity and pmoA gene abundance of methanotrophs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Environmental Science and Technology, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058, PR China.

ABSTRACT
Elevated global temperatures and increased concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere associated with climate change will exert profound effects on rice cropping systems, particularly on their greenhouse gas emitting potential. Incorporating biochar into paddy soil has been shown previously to reduce methane (CH4) emission from paddy rice under ambient temperature and CO2. We examined the ability of rice straw-derived biochar to reduce CH4 emission from paddy soil under elevated temperature and CO2 concentrations expected in the future. Adding biochar to paddy soil reduced CH4 emission under ambient conditions and significantly reduced emissions by 39.5% (ranging from 185.4 mg kg(-1) dry weight soil, dws season(-1) to 112.2 mg kg(-1) dws season(-1)) under simultaneously elevated temperature and CO2. Reduced CH4 release was mainly attributable to the decreased activity of methanogens along with the increased CH4 oxidation activity and pmoA gene abundance of methanotrophs. Our findings highlight the valuable services of biochar amendment for CH4 control from paddy soil in a future that will be shaped by climate change.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus