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Flow directionality, mountain barriers and functional traits determine diatom metacommunity structuring of high mountain streams.

Dong X, Li B, He F, Gu Y, Sun M, Zhang H, Tan L, Xiao W, Liu S, Cai Q - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Our results indicated that both environmental filtering and dispersal processes influenced metacommunity structuring, with dispersal contributing more than environmental processes.Our results highlighted that directional processes had prevailing effects on metacommunity structuring in high mountain streams.Flow directionality, mountain barriers and ecological guilds contributed to a better understanding of the roles that mountains played in structuring metacommunity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.

ABSTRACT
Stream metacommunities are structured by a combination of local (environmental filtering) and regional (dispersal) processes. The unique characters of high mountain streams could potentially determine metacommunity structuring, which is currently poorly understood. Aiming at understanding how these characters influenced metacommunity structuring, we explored the relative importance of local environmental conditions and various dispersal processes, including through geographical (overland), topographical (across mountain barriers) and network (along flow direction) pathways in shaping benthic diatom communities. From a trait perspective, diatoms were categorized into high-profile, low-profile and motile guild to examine the roles of functional traits. Our results indicated that both environmental filtering and dispersal processes influenced metacommunity structuring, with dispersal contributing more than environmental processes. Among the three pathways, stream corridors were primary pathway. Deconstructive analysis suggested different responses to environmental and spatial factors for each of three ecological guilds. However, regardless of traits, dispersal among streams was limited by mountain barriers, while dispersal along stream was promoted by rushing flow in high mountain stream. Our results highlighted that directional processes had prevailing effects on metacommunity structuring in high mountain streams. Flow directionality, mountain barriers and ecological guilds contributed to a better understanding of the roles that mountains played in structuring metacommunity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Hypothetical pathways of organisms’ dispersal among sites along or among streams in high mountains.(a) Geographical pathway (overland dispersal); (b) topographical pathway (across mountain barriers); (c) network pathway (along flow direction). The locations of communities are shown as green dots, streams are depicted by blue lines and red lines represent dispersal pathways between locations. The schematic diagrams were created with ArcGIS 10.0 (http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis) and modified with Adobe Photoshop CS6.
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f2: Hypothetical pathways of organisms’ dispersal among sites along or among streams in high mountains.(a) Geographical pathway (overland dispersal); (b) topographical pathway (across mountain barriers); (c) network pathway (along flow direction). The locations of communities are shown as green dots, streams are depicted by blue lines and red lines represent dispersal pathways between locations. The schematic diagrams were created with ArcGIS 10.0 (http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis) and modified with Adobe Photoshop CS6.

Mentions: The aim of our study was to understand diatom metacommunity structuring in high mountain streams. To cover the unique characters of high mountain streams, geographical distance, topographic distance and network distance along flow direction were applied to model all pathways of dispersal (Fig. 2). Relative contributions of these three dispersal processes were then assessed to understand how high mountains restricted dispersal processes. Afterwards, we analyzed the relative influences of environmental vs. dispersal processes to explore the mechanism of community assembly. For a better understanding, benthic diatoms were categorized into three ecological guilds (namely high-profile, low-profile and motile guild44) to further examine the roles of functional traits. We proposed three hypotheses based on the unique characters of high mountain streams and species traits of benthic diatoms:


Flow directionality, mountain barriers and functional traits determine diatom metacommunity structuring of high mountain streams.

Dong X, Li B, He F, Gu Y, Sun M, Zhang H, Tan L, Xiao W, Liu S, Cai Q - Sci Rep (2016)

Hypothetical pathways of organisms’ dispersal among sites along or among streams in high mountains.(a) Geographical pathway (overland dispersal); (b) topographical pathway (across mountain barriers); (c) network pathway (along flow direction). The locations of communities are shown as green dots, streams are depicted by blue lines and red lines represent dispersal pathways between locations. The schematic diagrams were created with ArcGIS 10.0 (http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis) and modified with Adobe Photoshop CS6.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835781&req=5

f2: Hypothetical pathways of organisms’ dispersal among sites along or among streams in high mountains.(a) Geographical pathway (overland dispersal); (b) topographical pathway (across mountain barriers); (c) network pathway (along flow direction). The locations of communities are shown as green dots, streams are depicted by blue lines and red lines represent dispersal pathways between locations. The schematic diagrams were created with ArcGIS 10.0 (http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis) and modified with Adobe Photoshop CS6.
Mentions: The aim of our study was to understand diatom metacommunity structuring in high mountain streams. To cover the unique characters of high mountain streams, geographical distance, topographic distance and network distance along flow direction were applied to model all pathways of dispersal (Fig. 2). Relative contributions of these three dispersal processes were then assessed to understand how high mountains restricted dispersal processes. Afterwards, we analyzed the relative influences of environmental vs. dispersal processes to explore the mechanism of community assembly. For a better understanding, benthic diatoms were categorized into three ecological guilds (namely high-profile, low-profile and motile guild44) to further examine the roles of functional traits. We proposed three hypotheses based on the unique characters of high mountain streams and species traits of benthic diatoms:

Bottom Line: Our results indicated that both environmental filtering and dispersal processes influenced metacommunity structuring, with dispersal contributing more than environmental processes.Our results highlighted that directional processes had prevailing effects on metacommunity structuring in high mountain streams.Flow directionality, mountain barriers and ecological guilds contributed to a better understanding of the roles that mountains played in structuring metacommunity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: State Key Laboratory of Freshwater Ecology and Biotechnology, Institute of Hydrobiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan, China.

ABSTRACT
Stream metacommunities are structured by a combination of local (environmental filtering) and regional (dispersal) processes. The unique characters of high mountain streams could potentially determine metacommunity structuring, which is currently poorly understood. Aiming at understanding how these characters influenced metacommunity structuring, we explored the relative importance of local environmental conditions and various dispersal processes, including through geographical (overland), topographical (across mountain barriers) and network (along flow direction) pathways in shaping benthic diatom communities. From a trait perspective, diatoms were categorized into high-profile, low-profile and motile guild to examine the roles of functional traits. Our results indicated that both environmental filtering and dispersal processes influenced metacommunity structuring, with dispersal contributing more than environmental processes. Among the three pathways, stream corridors were primary pathway. Deconstructive analysis suggested different responses to environmental and spatial factors for each of three ecological guilds. However, regardless of traits, dispersal among streams was limited by mountain barriers, while dispersal along stream was promoted by rushing flow in high mountain stream. Our results highlighted that directional processes had prevailing effects on metacommunity structuring in high mountain streams. Flow directionality, mountain barriers and ecological guilds contributed to a better understanding of the roles that mountains played in structuring metacommunity.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus