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Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice.

François A, Grebert D, Rhimi M, Mariadassou M, Naudon L, Rabot S, Meunier N - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes.Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium.As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NBO, UVSQ, INRA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-78350 Jouy-en-Josas, France.

ABSTRACT
Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Taxonomic diversity of the microbiota associated with the mouse olfactory epithelium.Analysis was based on 16S rDNA sequencing. Bar graphs show the relative distribution of phyla (A) and of families within the most abundant phyla (B–E) in the olfactory epithelium samples collected from conventional, specific-pathogen free, mice (n = 12).
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f1: Taxonomic diversity of the microbiota associated with the mouse olfactory epithelium.Analysis was based on 16S rDNA sequencing. Bar graphs show the relative distribution of phyla (A) and of families within the most abundant phyla (B–E) in the olfactory epithelium samples collected from conventional, specific-pathogen free, mice (n = 12).

Mentions: Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed the existence of a microbial community associated with the olfactory epithelium and gave an indication of its taxonomic structure. The olfactory epithelium microbial community of the conventional, specific pathogen free, mice was mainly dominated by 4 phyla: Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes accounted for 15% to 60% and 30% to 70% of the overall community, respectively; Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria accounted for 5% to 25% and less than 10%, respectively; other phyla were below 1% (Fig. 1A). The variability across individuals at the phylum level was also found at the family level, although a few number of families were dominant within each phylum, regardless of the individual (Fig. 1B–E). Bacteroidaceae markedly dominated the Bacteroidetes phylum; Enterococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae were the major Firmicutes families; and Enterobacteriaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae dominated the Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria phyla, respectively.


Olfactory epithelium changes in germfree mice.

François A, Grebert D, Rhimi M, Mariadassou M, Naudon L, Rabot S, Meunier N - Sci Rep (2016)

Taxonomic diversity of the microbiota associated with the mouse olfactory epithelium.Analysis was based on 16S rDNA sequencing. Bar graphs show the relative distribution of phyla (A) and of families within the most abundant phyla (B–E) in the olfactory epithelium samples collected from conventional, specific-pathogen free, mice (n = 12).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835764&req=5

f1: Taxonomic diversity of the microbiota associated with the mouse olfactory epithelium.Analysis was based on 16S rDNA sequencing. Bar graphs show the relative distribution of phyla (A) and of families within the most abundant phyla (B–E) in the olfactory epithelium samples collected from conventional, specific-pathogen free, mice (n = 12).
Mentions: Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene revealed the existence of a microbial community associated with the olfactory epithelium and gave an indication of its taxonomic structure. The olfactory epithelium microbial community of the conventional, specific pathogen free, mice was mainly dominated by 4 phyla: Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes accounted for 15% to 60% and 30% to 70% of the overall community, respectively; Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria accounted for 5% to 25% and less than 10%, respectively; other phyla were below 1% (Fig. 1A). The variability across individuals at the phylum level was also found at the family level, although a few number of families were dominant within each phylum, regardless of the individual (Fig. 1B–E). Bacteroidaceae markedly dominated the Bacteroidetes phylum; Enterococcaceae, Lachnospiraceae and Ruminococcaceae were the major Firmicutes families; and Enterobacteriaceae and Bifidobacteriaceae dominated the Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria phyla, respectively.

Bottom Line: These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes.Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium.As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: NBO, UVSQ, INRA, Université Paris-Saclay, F-78350 Jouy-en-Josas, France.

ABSTRACT
Intestinal epithelium development is dramatically impaired in germfree rodents, but the consequences of the absence of microbiota have been overlooked in other epithelia. In the present study, we present the first description of the bacterial communities associated with the olfactory epithelium and explored differences in olfactory epithelium characteristics between germfree and conventional, specific pathogen-free, mice. While the anatomy of the olfactory epithelium was not significantly different, we observed a thinner olfactory cilia layer along with a decreased cellular turn-over in germfree mice. Using electro-olfactogram, we recorded the responses of olfactory sensitive neuronal populations to various odorant stimulations. We observed a global increase in the amplitude of responses to odorants in germfree mice as well as altered responses kinetics. These changes were associated with a decreased transcription of most olfactory transduction actors and of olfactory xenobiotic metabolising enzymes. Overall, we present here the first evidence that the microbiota modulates the physiology of olfactory epithelium. As olfaction is a major sensory modality for most animal species, the microbiota may have an important impact on animal physiology and behaviour through olfaction alteration.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus