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Changing trends in the incidence (1999-2011) and mortality (1983-2013) of cervical cancer in the Republic of Korea.

Park Y, Vongdala C, Kim J, Ki M - Epidemiol Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Yearly age-standardized rates (ASR) per 100,000 were compared using two standards: the 2005 Korean population and the world standard population, based on Segi's world standard for incidence and the World Health Organization for mortality.Moreover, incidence and mortality rates in females aged 30 years or under have recently increased.It is necessary to develop effective policy to reduce both incidence and mortality, particularly in younger age groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cancer Control and Policy, Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Cervical cancer is a well-known preventable cancer worldwide. Many countries including Korea have pursued the positive endpoint of a reduction in mortality from cervical cancer. Our aim is to examine changing trends in cervical cancer incidence and mortality after the implementation of a national preventive effort in Korea. Cervical cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2011 and mortality data from 1983 to 2013 were collected from the Korean Statistical Information Service. Yearly age-standardized rates (ASR) per 100,000 were compared using two standards: the 2005 Korean population and the world standard population, based on Segi's world standard for incidence and the World Health Organization for mortality. In Korea, the age-standardized incidence of cervical cancer per 100,000 persons declined from 17.2 in 2000 to 11.8 in 2011. However, the group aged 25 to 29 showed a higher rate in 2011 (ASR, 6.5) than in 2000 (ASR, 3.6). The age-standardized mortality rate per 100,000 persons dropped from 2.81 in 2000 to 1.95 in 2013. In the worldwide comparison, the incidence rates remained close to the average incidence estimate of more developed regions (ASR, 9.9). The decreasing mortality trend in Korea approached the lower rate observed in Australia (ASR, 1.4) in 2010. Although the incidence rate of cervical cancer is continuously declining in Korea, it is still high relative to other countries. Moreover, incidence and mortality rates in females aged 30 years or under have recently increased. It is necessary to develop effective policy to reduce both incidence and mortality, particularly in younger age groups.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Age-specific mortality rates per 100,000 populations of cervical cancer in Korea, 2000 and 2011. Source from Korean Statistical Information Service. Death causes by 5-year age group and gender, mortality rates (1983-2013); 2014 [13].
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f4-epih-37-e2015024: Age-specific mortality rates per 100,000 populations of cervical cancer in Korea, 2000 and 2011. Source from Korean Statistical Information Service. Death causes by 5-year age group and gender, mortality rates (1983-2013); 2014 [13].

Mentions: Groups aged 50 and over generally had a higher proportion of overall mortality from cervical cancer. From the ages of the mid-30s to mid-40s, the mortality rates increased significantly. During the years from 2000 to 2011, mortality rates were not changed or improved in any age group except in the older groups aged in the mid-50s and above. In certain age groups, mortality rates were higher in the more recent year of 2011 than in 2000. The age groups of 30 to 34 and 50 to 54 showed significantly higher mortality rates in 2011, with 0.13 per 100,000 and 0.36 per 100,000, respectively, compared to 0.06 per 100,000 and 0.30 per 100,000 in 2000 (Figure 4).


Changing trends in the incidence (1999-2011) and mortality (1983-2013) of cervical cancer in the Republic of Korea.

Park Y, Vongdala C, Kim J, Ki M - Epidemiol Health (2015)

Age-specific mortality rates per 100,000 populations of cervical cancer in Korea, 2000 and 2011. Source from Korean Statistical Information Service. Death causes by 5-year age group and gender, mortality rates (1983-2013); 2014 [13].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835755&req=5

f4-epih-37-e2015024: Age-specific mortality rates per 100,000 populations of cervical cancer in Korea, 2000 and 2011. Source from Korean Statistical Information Service. Death causes by 5-year age group and gender, mortality rates (1983-2013); 2014 [13].
Mentions: Groups aged 50 and over generally had a higher proportion of overall mortality from cervical cancer. From the ages of the mid-30s to mid-40s, the mortality rates increased significantly. During the years from 2000 to 2011, mortality rates were not changed or improved in any age group except in the older groups aged in the mid-50s and above. In certain age groups, mortality rates were higher in the more recent year of 2011 than in 2000. The age groups of 30 to 34 and 50 to 54 showed significantly higher mortality rates in 2011, with 0.13 per 100,000 and 0.36 per 100,000, respectively, compared to 0.06 per 100,000 and 0.30 per 100,000 in 2000 (Figure 4).

Bottom Line: Yearly age-standardized rates (ASR) per 100,000 were compared using two standards: the 2005 Korean population and the world standard population, based on Segi's world standard for incidence and the World Health Organization for mortality.Moreover, incidence and mortality rates in females aged 30 years or under have recently increased.It is necessary to develop effective policy to reduce both incidence and mortality, particularly in younger age groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cancer Control and Policy, Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Cervical cancer is a well-known preventable cancer worldwide. Many countries including Korea have pursued the positive endpoint of a reduction in mortality from cervical cancer. Our aim is to examine changing trends in cervical cancer incidence and mortality after the implementation of a national preventive effort in Korea. Cervical cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2011 and mortality data from 1983 to 2013 were collected from the Korean Statistical Information Service. Yearly age-standardized rates (ASR) per 100,000 were compared using two standards: the 2005 Korean population and the world standard population, based on Segi's world standard for incidence and the World Health Organization for mortality. In Korea, the age-standardized incidence of cervical cancer per 100,000 persons declined from 17.2 in 2000 to 11.8 in 2011. However, the group aged 25 to 29 showed a higher rate in 2011 (ASR, 6.5) than in 2000 (ASR, 3.6). The age-standardized mortality rate per 100,000 persons dropped from 2.81 in 2000 to 1.95 in 2013. In the worldwide comparison, the incidence rates remained close to the average incidence estimate of more developed regions (ASR, 9.9). The decreasing mortality trend in Korea approached the lower rate observed in Australia (ASR, 1.4) in 2010. Although the incidence rate of cervical cancer is continuously declining in Korea, it is still high relative to other countries. Moreover, incidence and mortality rates in females aged 30 years or under have recently increased. It is necessary to develop effective policy to reduce both incidence and mortality, particularly in younger age groups.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus