Limits...
Changing trends in the incidence (1999-2011) and mortality (1983-2013) of cervical cancer in the Republic of Korea.

Park Y, Vongdala C, Kim J, Ki M - Epidemiol Health (2015)

Bottom Line: Yearly age-standardized rates (ASR) per 100,000 were compared using two standards: the 2005 Korean population and the world standard population, based on Segi's world standard for incidence and the World Health Organization for mortality.Moreover, incidence and mortality rates in females aged 30 years or under have recently increased.It is necessary to develop effective policy to reduce both incidence and mortality, particularly in younger age groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cancer Control and Policy, Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Cervical cancer is a well-known preventable cancer worldwide. Many countries including Korea have pursued the positive endpoint of a reduction in mortality from cervical cancer. Our aim is to examine changing trends in cervical cancer incidence and mortality after the implementation of a national preventive effort in Korea. Cervical cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2011 and mortality data from 1983 to 2013 were collected from the Korean Statistical Information Service. Yearly age-standardized rates (ASR) per 100,000 were compared using two standards: the 2005 Korean population and the world standard population, based on Segi's world standard for incidence and the World Health Organization for mortality. In Korea, the age-standardized incidence of cervical cancer per 100,000 persons declined from 17.2 in 2000 to 11.8 in 2011. However, the group aged 25 to 29 showed a higher rate in 2011 (ASR, 6.5) than in 2000 (ASR, 3.6). The age-standardized mortality rate per 100,000 persons dropped from 2.81 in 2000 to 1.95 in 2013. In the worldwide comparison, the incidence rates remained close to the average incidence estimate of more developed regions (ASR, 9.9). The decreasing mortality trend in Korea approached the lower rate observed in Australia (ASR, 1.4) in 2010. Although the incidence rate of cervical cancer is continuously declining in Korea, it is still high relative to other countries. Moreover, incidence and mortality rates in females aged 30 years or under have recently increased. It is necessary to develop effective policy to reduce both incidence and mortality, particularly in younger age groups.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Trends of incidence rates of cervical cancer, worldwide, 1990-20122. Source from International Agency for Research on Cancer. GLOBOCAN 2012: estimated cancer incidence, mortality and prevalence worldwide in 2012; 2014 [17]; International Agency for Research on Cancer. Cancer incidence in five continents volume X(CI5X); 2013; 2014 [18]. SEER, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results. 1Age-adjusted to Segi ‘s world standard population; ASR, age-standardized rates. 2Estimated incidence rate in ASR (W), 2012: the estimates incidence rates in the year of 2012 are representable for each country as a whole while the data from CI-5 were collected selectively by cancer registry regions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835755&req=5

f3-epih-37-e2015024: Trends of incidence rates of cervical cancer, worldwide, 1990-20122. Source from International Agency for Research on Cancer. GLOBOCAN 2012: estimated cancer incidence, mortality and prevalence worldwide in 2012; 2014 [17]; International Agency for Research on Cancer. Cancer incidence in five continents volume X(CI5X); 2013; 2014 [18]. SEER, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results. 1Age-adjusted to Segi ‘s world standard population; ASR, age-standardized rates. 2Estimated incidence rate in ASR (W), 2012: the estimates incidence rates in the year of 2012 are representable for each country as a whole while the data from CI-5 were collected selectively by cancer registry regions.

Mentions: For the worldwide comparison, converted rates using Segi’s world population appear lower than the rates using the 2005 Korean population, such that incidence changes from 18.6 per 100,000 (ASR, K) to 16.3 per 100,000 (ASR, W) in 1999 and from 11.7 per 100,000 (ASR, K) to 10.1 per 100,000 (ASR, W) in 2011. Compared to more developed countries, incidence rates in Korea are relatively high (Figure 3). For instance, the ASR of 12.4 per 100,000 in 2005 is similar to that of New Zealand in 1990 (ASR, W: 12.65 per 100,000), which was the highest reported rate in 1990 among comparable countries. From the 1990s to 2007, all other countries compared showed lower incidence than Korea, and showed a steadily decreasing pattern during this time. The GLOBOCAN project estimated the cervical cancer incidence rates in 2012. Due to the different regional classifications used in the GLOBOCAN and CI-5, only two among eight countries could be compared in this study (Figure 3): an ASR of 9.5 per 100,000 in Korea and 5.3 per 100,000 in New Zealand.


Changing trends in the incidence (1999-2011) and mortality (1983-2013) of cervical cancer in the Republic of Korea.

Park Y, Vongdala C, Kim J, Ki M - Epidemiol Health (2015)

Trends of incidence rates of cervical cancer, worldwide, 1990-20122. Source from International Agency for Research on Cancer. GLOBOCAN 2012: estimated cancer incidence, mortality and prevalence worldwide in 2012; 2014 [17]; International Agency for Research on Cancer. Cancer incidence in five continents volume X(CI5X); 2013; 2014 [18]. SEER, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results. 1Age-adjusted to Segi ‘s world standard population; ASR, age-standardized rates. 2Estimated incidence rate in ASR (W), 2012: the estimates incidence rates in the year of 2012 are representable for each country as a whole while the data from CI-5 were collected selectively by cancer registry regions.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835755&req=5

f3-epih-37-e2015024: Trends of incidence rates of cervical cancer, worldwide, 1990-20122. Source from International Agency for Research on Cancer. GLOBOCAN 2012: estimated cancer incidence, mortality and prevalence worldwide in 2012; 2014 [17]; International Agency for Research on Cancer. Cancer incidence in five continents volume X(CI5X); 2013; 2014 [18]. SEER, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results. 1Age-adjusted to Segi ‘s world standard population; ASR, age-standardized rates. 2Estimated incidence rate in ASR (W), 2012: the estimates incidence rates in the year of 2012 are representable for each country as a whole while the data from CI-5 were collected selectively by cancer registry regions.
Mentions: For the worldwide comparison, converted rates using Segi’s world population appear lower than the rates using the 2005 Korean population, such that incidence changes from 18.6 per 100,000 (ASR, K) to 16.3 per 100,000 (ASR, W) in 1999 and from 11.7 per 100,000 (ASR, K) to 10.1 per 100,000 (ASR, W) in 2011. Compared to more developed countries, incidence rates in Korea are relatively high (Figure 3). For instance, the ASR of 12.4 per 100,000 in 2005 is similar to that of New Zealand in 1990 (ASR, W: 12.65 per 100,000), which was the highest reported rate in 1990 among comparable countries. From the 1990s to 2007, all other countries compared showed lower incidence than Korea, and showed a steadily decreasing pattern during this time. The GLOBOCAN project estimated the cervical cancer incidence rates in 2012. Due to the different regional classifications used in the GLOBOCAN and CI-5, only two among eight countries could be compared in this study (Figure 3): an ASR of 9.5 per 100,000 in Korea and 5.3 per 100,000 in New Zealand.

Bottom Line: Yearly age-standardized rates (ASR) per 100,000 were compared using two standards: the 2005 Korean population and the world standard population, based on Segi's world standard for incidence and the World Health Organization for mortality.Moreover, incidence and mortality rates in females aged 30 years or under have recently increased.It is necessary to develop effective policy to reduce both incidence and mortality, particularly in younger age groups.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cancer Control and Policy, Graduate School of Cancer Science and Policy, National Cancer Center, Goyang, Korea.

ABSTRACT
Cervical cancer is a well-known preventable cancer worldwide. Many countries including Korea have pursued the positive endpoint of a reduction in mortality from cervical cancer. Our aim is to examine changing trends in cervical cancer incidence and mortality after the implementation of a national preventive effort in Korea. Cervical cancer incidence data from 1999 to 2011 and mortality data from 1983 to 2013 were collected from the Korean Statistical Information Service. Yearly age-standardized rates (ASR) per 100,000 were compared using two standards: the 2005 Korean population and the world standard population, based on Segi's world standard for incidence and the World Health Organization for mortality. In Korea, the age-standardized incidence of cervical cancer per 100,000 persons declined from 17.2 in 2000 to 11.8 in 2011. However, the group aged 25 to 29 showed a higher rate in 2011 (ASR, 6.5) than in 2000 (ASR, 3.6). The age-standardized mortality rate per 100,000 persons dropped from 2.81 in 2000 to 1.95 in 2013. In the worldwide comparison, the incidence rates remained close to the average incidence estimate of more developed regions (ASR, 9.9). The decreasing mortality trend in Korea approached the lower rate observed in Australia (ASR, 1.4) in 2010. Although the incidence rate of cervical cancer is continuously declining in Korea, it is still high relative to other countries. Moreover, incidence and mortality rates in females aged 30 years or under have recently increased. It is necessary to develop effective policy to reduce both incidence and mortality, particularly in younger age groups.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus