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Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray.

Cai Y, Coyle TW, Azimi G, Mostaghimi J - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS).The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature.The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, ON, M5S 3G8, Canada.

ABSTRACT
This work presents a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The effects of various spraying conditions including standoff distance, torch power, number of torch passes, types of solvent and plasma velocity were investigated. The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature. The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

An overview of the SPPS process and the wetting behavior of the coated surface.(a) Schematic of the SPPS deposition system. (b) Water droplets of different sizes on the coated surface (Condition 1). The reflection at the bottom of the water droplets shows an air gap exists in between the droplet and the coating. Sample size is 25.4 mm in diameter.
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f1: An overview of the SPPS process and the wetting behavior of the coated surface.(a) Schematic of the SPPS deposition system. (b) Water droplets of different sizes on the coated surface (Condition 1). The reflection at the bottom of the water droplets shows an air gap exists in between the droplet and the coating. Sample size is 25.4 mm in diameter.

Mentions: In SPPS spraying conditions can be controlled in order to achieve the desired coating microstructure and functionality. The effect of each spraying parameter on the coating microstructure is often nonlinear. Here, we presented an extensive examination of the effects of different plasma spraying conditions on the coating microstructure and hydrophobicity. The solution used in the experiment was prepared by dissolving 99.999% ytterbium nitrate pentahydrate (Pangea International, Shanghai, China) in distilled water or a distilled water and ethanol mixture. The solution was deposited using an Axial III Series 600 plasma torch (Northwest Mettech Corp., BC, Canada) on stainless steel substrates (see Methods). Figure 1a is a schematic diagram of the spraying system, and Fig. 1b shows non-wetting water droplets on the coated surface. Twelve different spraying conditions were examined (Table 1). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Hitachi SU 3500, see Methods) was used to characterize the cross-sectional microstructures of the coatings. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was performed to determine the phase composition of the coating material (see Supplementary Fig. S1) using a Miniflex600 (Rigaku, MI, USA). The coating thickness, porosity, surface roughness, water contact angle and contact angle hysteresis for all spraying conditions were measured (see Supplementary Table S1).


Superhydrophobic Ceramic Coatings by Solution Precursor Plasma Spray.

Cai Y, Coyle TW, Azimi G, Mostaghimi J - Sci Rep (2016)

An overview of the SPPS process and the wetting behavior of the coated surface.(a) Schematic of the SPPS deposition system. (b) Water droplets of different sizes on the coated surface (Condition 1). The reflection at the bottom of the water droplets shows an air gap exists in between the droplet and the coating. Sample size is 25.4 mm in diameter.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835754&req=5

f1: An overview of the SPPS process and the wetting behavior of the coated surface.(a) Schematic of the SPPS deposition system. (b) Water droplets of different sizes on the coated surface (Condition 1). The reflection at the bottom of the water droplets shows an air gap exists in between the droplet and the coating. Sample size is 25.4 mm in diameter.
Mentions: In SPPS spraying conditions can be controlled in order to achieve the desired coating microstructure and functionality. The effect of each spraying parameter on the coating microstructure is often nonlinear. Here, we presented an extensive examination of the effects of different plasma spraying conditions on the coating microstructure and hydrophobicity. The solution used in the experiment was prepared by dissolving 99.999% ytterbium nitrate pentahydrate (Pangea International, Shanghai, China) in distilled water or a distilled water and ethanol mixture. The solution was deposited using an Axial III Series 600 plasma torch (Northwest Mettech Corp., BC, Canada) on stainless steel substrates (see Methods). Figure 1a is a schematic diagram of the spraying system, and Fig. 1b shows non-wetting water droplets on the coated surface. Twelve different spraying conditions were examined (Table 1). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Hitachi SU 3500, see Methods) was used to characterize the cross-sectional microstructures of the coatings. X-ray diffraction (XRD) was performed to determine the phase composition of the coating material (see Supplementary Fig. S1) using a Miniflex600 (Rigaku, MI, USA). The coating thickness, porosity, surface roughness, water contact angle and contact angle hysteresis for all spraying conditions were measured (see Supplementary Table S1).

Bottom Line: A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS).The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature.The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King's College Road, Toronto, ON, M5S 3G8, Canada.

ABSTRACT
This work presents a novel coating technique to manufacture ceramic superhydrophobic coatings rapidly and economically. A rare earth oxide (REO) was selected as the coating material due to its hydrophobic nature, chemical inertness, high temperature stability, and good mechanical properties, and deposited on stainless steel substrates by solution precursor plasma spray (SPPS). The effects of various spraying conditions including standoff distance, torch power, number of torch passes, types of solvent and plasma velocity were investigated. The as-sprayed coating demonstrated a hierarchically structured surface topography, which closely resembles superhydrophobic surfaces found in nature. The water contact angle on the SPPS superhydrophobic coating was up to 65% higher than on smooth REO surfaces.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus