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Randomized study of effectiveness of computerized ultrasound simulators for an introductory course for residents in Brazil.

Silva JP, Plescia T, Molina N, Tonelli AC, Langdorf M, Fox JC - J Educ Eval Health Prof (2016)

Bottom Line: Both participated in lecture and hands-on training, but experimental group received an hour of computerized simulator training instead of a second hour of hands-on training.For the 30-item written exam, mean score of the experimental group was 23.1±3.4 (n=21) vs. 21.8±4.8 (n=19), (P>0 .05).For the practical exam, mean score for both groups was 8.7 out of 16 (P>0 .05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study aimed to assess the impact of ultrasound simulation (SonoSim) on educational outcomes of an introductory point-of-care ultrasound course compared to hands-on training with live models alone.

Methods: Fifty-three internal medicine residents without ultrasound experience were randomly assigned to control or experimental groups. They participated in an introductory point-of-care ultrasound course covering eight topics in eight sessions from June 23, 2014 until July 18, 2014. Both participated in lecture and hands-on training, but experimental group received an hour of computerized simulator training instead of a second hour of hands-on training. We assessed clinical knowledge and image acquisition with written multiple-choice and practical exams, respectively. Of the 53 enrolled, 40 participants (75.5%) completed the course and all testing.

Results: For the 30-item written exam, mean score of the experimental group was 23.1±3.4 (n=21) vs. 21.8±4.8 (n=19), (P>0 .05). For the practical exam, mean score for both groups was 8.7 out of 16 (P>0 .05).

Conclusion: The substitution of eight hours of ultrasound simulation training for live model scanning in a 24 hour training course did not enhance performance on written and image acquisition tests in an introductory ultrasound course for residents. This result suggests that ultrasound simulation technology used as a substitute for live model training on an hour-for-hour basis, did not improve learning outcomes. Further investigation into simulation as a total replacement for live model training will provide a clearer picture of the efficacy of ultrasound simulators in medical education.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Ultrasound images used as an answer key for the practical exam. (A) Right upper quadrant view. (B) Parasternal long axis view. (C) Parasternal short axis view. (D) Visceral-parietal pleural interface with M-mode. (E) Carotid/internal jugular vein with color Doppler.
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f1-jeehp-13-16: Ultrasound images used as an answer key for the practical exam. (A) Right upper quadrant view. (B) Parasternal long axis view. (C) Parasternal short axis view. (D) Visceral-parietal pleural interface with M-mode. (E) Carotid/internal jugular vein with color Doppler.

Mentions: The 16-point practical exam was designed to assess the subjects’ ability to operate the ultrasound device, properly insonate key POC ultrasound structures, and utilize advanced imaging functions (Appendix 1). Subjects were allowed six minutes to scan a live model and save five images (Fig. 1): (1) right upper quadrant organs and landmarks; (2) parasternal long axis view of the heart; (3) parasternal short axis view of the heart; (4) visceral-parietal pleural interface (VPPI) on M-mode (for detection of pneumothorax); and (5) right carotid artery/internal jugular vein of the neck with color Doppler.


Randomized study of effectiveness of computerized ultrasound simulators for an introductory course for residents in Brazil.

Silva JP, Plescia T, Molina N, Tonelli AC, Langdorf M, Fox JC - J Educ Eval Health Prof (2016)

Ultrasound images used as an answer key for the practical exam. (A) Right upper quadrant view. (B) Parasternal long axis view. (C) Parasternal short axis view. (D) Visceral-parietal pleural interface with M-mode. (E) Carotid/internal jugular vein with color Doppler.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835743&req=5

f1-jeehp-13-16: Ultrasound images used as an answer key for the practical exam. (A) Right upper quadrant view. (B) Parasternal long axis view. (C) Parasternal short axis view. (D) Visceral-parietal pleural interface with M-mode. (E) Carotid/internal jugular vein with color Doppler.
Mentions: The 16-point practical exam was designed to assess the subjects’ ability to operate the ultrasound device, properly insonate key POC ultrasound structures, and utilize advanced imaging functions (Appendix 1). Subjects were allowed six minutes to scan a live model and save five images (Fig. 1): (1) right upper quadrant organs and landmarks; (2) parasternal long axis view of the heart; (3) parasternal short axis view of the heart; (4) visceral-parietal pleural interface (VPPI) on M-mode (for detection of pneumothorax); and (5) right carotid artery/internal jugular vein of the neck with color Doppler.

Bottom Line: Both participated in lecture and hands-on training, but experimental group received an hour of computerized simulator training instead of a second hour of hands-on training.For the 30-item written exam, mean score of the experimental group was 23.1±3.4 (n=21) vs. 21.8±4.8 (n=19), (P>0 .05).For the practical exam, mean score for both groups was 8.7 out of 16 (P>0 .05).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medicine, University of California Irvine School of Medicine, Irvine, CA, USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study aimed to assess the impact of ultrasound simulation (SonoSim) on educational outcomes of an introductory point-of-care ultrasound course compared to hands-on training with live models alone.

Methods: Fifty-three internal medicine residents without ultrasound experience were randomly assigned to control or experimental groups. They participated in an introductory point-of-care ultrasound course covering eight topics in eight sessions from June 23, 2014 until July 18, 2014. Both participated in lecture and hands-on training, but experimental group received an hour of computerized simulator training instead of a second hour of hands-on training. We assessed clinical knowledge and image acquisition with written multiple-choice and practical exams, respectively. Of the 53 enrolled, 40 participants (75.5%) completed the course and all testing.

Results: For the 30-item written exam, mean score of the experimental group was 23.1±3.4 (n=21) vs. 21.8±4.8 (n=19), (P>0 .05). For the practical exam, mean score for both groups was 8.7 out of 16 (P>0 .05).

Conclusion: The substitution of eight hours of ultrasound simulation training for live model scanning in a 24 hour training course did not enhance performance on written and image acquisition tests in an introductory ultrasound course for residents. This result suggests that ultrasound simulation technology used as a substitute for live model training on an hour-for-hour basis, did not improve learning outcomes. Further investigation into simulation as a total replacement for live model training will provide a clearer picture of the efficacy of ultrasound simulators in medical education.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus