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Medical students' satisfaction with the Applied Basic Clinical Seminar with Scenarios for Students, a novel simulation-based learning method in Greece.

Pantelidis P, Staikoglou N, Paparoidamis G, Drosos C, Karamaroudis S, Samara A, Keskinis C, Sideris M, Giannakoulas G, Tsoulfas G, Karagiannis A - J Educ Eval Health Prof (2016)

Bottom Line: The mean overall feedback score was 4.12 (±0.56) out of 5.Students scored significantly higher on the post-test than on the pre-test (P<0.001).The ABCS3 was found to be an effective SBL program, as medical students reported positive opinions about their experiences and exhibited improvements in their clinical knowledge and skills.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The integration of simulation-based learning (SBL) methods holds promise for improving the medical education system in Greece. The Applied Basic Clinical Seminar with Scenarios for Students (ABCS3) is a novel two-day SBL course that was designed by the Scientific Society of Hellenic Medical Students. The ABCS3 targeted undergraduate medical students and consisted of three core components: the case-based lectures, the ABCDE hands-on station, and the simulation-based clinical scenarios. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the general educational environment of the course, as well as the skills and knowledge acquired by the participants.

Methods: Two sets of questions were distributed to the participants: the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaire and an internally designed feedback questionnaire (InEv). A multiple-choice examination was also distributed prior to the course and following its completion. A total of 176 participants answered the DREEM questionnaire, 56 the InEv, and 60 the MCQs.

Results: The overall DREEM score was 144.61 (±28.05) out of 200. Delegates who participated in both the case-based lectures and the interactive scenarios core components scored higher than those who only completed the case-based lecture session (P=0.038). The mean overall feedback score was 4.12 (±0.56) out of 5. Students scored significantly higher on the post-test than on the pre-test (P<0.001).

Conclusion: The ABCS3 was found to be an effective SBL program, as medical students reported positive opinions about their experiences and exhibited improvements in their clinical knowledge and skills.

No MeSH data available.


Simulation-based clinical scenarios Sc10 and Sc5 achieved the highest general satisfaction score on the InEv inventory, while Sc2 received the lowest.
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f2-jeehp-13-13: Simulation-based clinical scenarios Sc10 and Sc5 achieved the highest general satisfaction score on the InEv inventory, while Sc2 received the lowest.

Mentions: A total of 56 out of 60 participants (31 males and 25 females) in the full category answered the questionnaire. The reliability of the InEv inventory was tested with Cronbach’s alpha test and found to be acceptable (>0.8 for the entire inventory and the TrS, FaS, and TiS subsets, but not for SatS[0.781]). With 5 as the maximum score, the results were: TrS=4.24 (±0.55), FaS=4.21 (±0.70), TiS=3.94 (±0.82), SatS=4.08 (±0.53), ICl=4.16 (±0.73) and OvS=4.12 (±0.56) (Table 2). No statistically significant differences were found according to gender, years of study, and school (P>0.05). The independent-samples Kruskal-Wallis test revealed statistically significant differences (P<0.001) in general satisfaction among Sc1 through Sc10: Sc2 scored significantly lower than all the other scenarios, except Sc3 and Sc4 (not significantly lower). Sc10 had the highest score, and differed significantly from all the other scenarios, except Sc1, Sc5, and Sc9. Finally, Sc5 had the second highest score, scoring significantly higher than Sc2, Sc3, and Sc5 (Fig. 2).


Medical students' satisfaction with the Applied Basic Clinical Seminar with Scenarios for Students, a novel simulation-based learning method in Greece.

Pantelidis P, Staikoglou N, Paparoidamis G, Drosos C, Karamaroudis S, Samara A, Keskinis C, Sideris M, Giannakoulas G, Tsoulfas G, Karagiannis A - J Educ Eval Health Prof (2016)

Simulation-based clinical scenarios Sc10 and Sc5 achieved the highest general satisfaction score on the InEv inventory, while Sc2 received the lowest.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835742&req=5

f2-jeehp-13-13: Simulation-based clinical scenarios Sc10 and Sc5 achieved the highest general satisfaction score on the InEv inventory, while Sc2 received the lowest.
Mentions: A total of 56 out of 60 participants (31 males and 25 females) in the full category answered the questionnaire. The reliability of the InEv inventory was tested with Cronbach’s alpha test and found to be acceptable (>0.8 for the entire inventory and the TrS, FaS, and TiS subsets, but not for SatS[0.781]). With 5 as the maximum score, the results were: TrS=4.24 (±0.55), FaS=4.21 (±0.70), TiS=3.94 (±0.82), SatS=4.08 (±0.53), ICl=4.16 (±0.73) and OvS=4.12 (±0.56) (Table 2). No statistically significant differences were found according to gender, years of study, and school (P>0.05). The independent-samples Kruskal-Wallis test revealed statistically significant differences (P<0.001) in general satisfaction among Sc1 through Sc10: Sc2 scored significantly lower than all the other scenarios, except Sc3 and Sc4 (not significantly lower). Sc10 had the highest score, and differed significantly from all the other scenarios, except Sc1, Sc5, and Sc9. Finally, Sc5 had the second highest score, scoring significantly higher than Sc2, Sc3, and Sc5 (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: The mean overall feedback score was 4.12 (±0.56) out of 5.Students scored significantly higher on the post-test than on the pre-test (P<0.001).The ABCS3 was found to be an effective SBL program, as medical students reported positive opinions about their experiences and exhibited improvements in their clinical knowledge and skills.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Medical Department, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The integration of simulation-based learning (SBL) methods holds promise for improving the medical education system in Greece. The Applied Basic Clinical Seminar with Scenarios for Students (ABCS3) is a novel two-day SBL course that was designed by the Scientific Society of Hellenic Medical Students. The ABCS3 targeted undergraduate medical students and consisted of three core components: the case-based lectures, the ABCDE hands-on station, and the simulation-based clinical scenarios. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the general educational environment of the course, as well as the skills and knowledge acquired by the participants.

Methods: Two sets of questions were distributed to the participants: the Dundee Ready Educational Environment Measure (DREEM) questionnaire and an internally designed feedback questionnaire (InEv). A multiple-choice examination was also distributed prior to the course and following its completion. A total of 176 participants answered the DREEM questionnaire, 56 the InEv, and 60 the MCQs.

Results: The overall DREEM score was 144.61 (±28.05) out of 200. Delegates who participated in both the case-based lectures and the interactive scenarios core components scored higher than those who only completed the case-based lecture session (P=0.038). The mean overall feedback score was 4.12 (±0.56) out of 5. Students scored significantly higher on the post-test than on the pre-test (P<0.001).

Conclusion: The ABCS3 was found to be an effective SBL program, as medical students reported positive opinions about their experiences and exhibited improvements in their clinical knowledge and skills.

No MeSH data available.