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The effects of a low-energy, high frequency liquid optic interface femtosecond laser system on lens capsulotomy.

Williams GP, George BL, Wong YR, Seah XY, Ang HP, Loke MK, Tay SC, Mehta JS - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: The merits of using a laser instead of a manual approach include a potentially more circular, consistent, and stronger aperture.In this study we demonstrated for the first time in both a porcine and human experimental setting that with a low energy, high repetition FLACS system, that a circular, smooth and strong capsulotomy was achievable.The LDV Z8 system appeared to create circular, rupture-resistant and smooth capsulotomies in both porcine and more importantly human globes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tissue Engineering and Stem Cell Group, Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore, Singapore.

ABSTRACT
The introduction of femtosecond laser assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) is a paradigm changing approach in cataract surgery, the most commonly performed surgical procedure. FLACS has the potential to optimize the creation of an anterior lens capsulotomy, a critical step in accessing the cataractous lens. The merits of using a laser instead of a manual approach include a potentially more circular, consistent, and stronger aperture. In this study we demonstrated for the first time in both a porcine and human experimental setting that with a low energy, high repetition FLACS system, that a circular, smooth and strong capsulotomy was achievable. While there was no demonstrable difference in the resistance to rupture before or after the removal of the nucleus, larger capsulotomies had an increase in tensile strength. The LDV Z8 system appeared to create circular, rupture-resistant and smooth capsulotomies in both porcine and more importantly human globes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Capsule edge morphology at different magnification with the Z8 femtosecond laser capsulotomy.Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of capsule edge taken at low magnification (A) ×140, ×750 and ×4000 magnification for 4, 5 and 6 mm capsulotomy (n = 18) ((B) upper to lower rows). A micro-tag is highlighted with a hatched arrow and the capsule edges at high magnifications by straight arrows.
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f2: Capsule edge morphology at different magnification with the Z8 femtosecond laser capsulotomy.Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of capsule edge taken at low magnification (A) ×140, ×750 and ×4000 magnification for 4, 5 and 6 mm capsulotomy (n = 18) ((B) upper to lower rows). A micro-tag is highlighted with a hatched arrow and the capsule edges at high magnifications by straight arrows.

Mentions: A representative low magnification image of the membrane-mounted capsule is shown with overlying sutures (n = 18) (Fig. 2A). Removable non-significant micro-tags were evident on SEM in 2/18 cases but otherwise relatively smooth edges were observed and no anterior capsule tears occurred (Fig. 2B).


The effects of a low-energy, high frequency liquid optic interface femtosecond laser system on lens capsulotomy.

Williams GP, George BL, Wong YR, Seah XY, Ang HP, Loke MK, Tay SC, Mehta JS - Sci Rep (2016)

Capsule edge morphology at different magnification with the Z8 femtosecond laser capsulotomy.Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of capsule edge taken at low magnification (A) ×140, ×750 and ×4000 magnification for 4, 5 and 6 mm capsulotomy (n = 18) ((B) upper to lower rows). A micro-tag is highlighted with a hatched arrow and the capsule edges at high magnifications by straight arrows.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835735&req=5

f2: Capsule edge morphology at different magnification with the Z8 femtosecond laser capsulotomy.Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of capsule edge taken at low magnification (A) ×140, ×750 and ×4000 magnification for 4, 5 and 6 mm capsulotomy (n = 18) ((B) upper to lower rows). A micro-tag is highlighted with a hatched arrow and the capsule edges at high magnifications by straight arrows.
Mentions: A representative low magnification image of the membrane-mounted capsule is shown with overlying sutures (n = 18) (Fig. 2A). Removable non-significant micro-tags were evident on SEM in 2/18 cases but otherwise relatively smooth edges were observed and no anterior capsule tears occurred (Fig. 2B).

Bottom Line: The merits of using a laser instead of a manual approach include a potentially more circular, consistent, and stronger aperture.In this study we demonstrated for the first time in both a porcine and human experimental setting that with a low energy, high repetition FLACS system, that a circular, smooth and strong capsulotomy was achievable.The LDV Z8 system appeared to create circular, rupture-resistant and smooth capsulotomies in both porcine and more importantly human globes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tissue Engineering and Stem Cell Group, Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore, Singapore.

ABSTRACT
The introduction of femtosecond laser assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) is a paradigm changing approach in cataract surgery, the most commonly performed surgical procedure. FLACS has the potential to optimize the creation of an anterior lens capsulotomy, a critical step in accessing the cataractous lens. The merits of using a laser instead of a manual approach include a potentially more circular, consistent, and stronger aperture. In this study we demonstrated for the first time in both a porcine and human experimental setting that with a low energy, high repetition FLACS system, that a circular, smooth and strong capsulotomy was achievable. While there was no demonstrable difference in the resistance to rupture before or after the removal of the nucleus, larger capsulotomies had an increase in tensile strength. The LDV Z8 system appeared to create circular, rupture-resistant and smooth capsulotomies in both porcine and more importantly human globes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus