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Solution-Processed Donor-Acceptor Polymer Nanowire Network Semiconductors For High-Performance Field-Effect Transistors.

Lei Y, Deng P, Li J, Lin M, Zhu F, Ng TW, Lee CS, Ong BS - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) represent a low-cost transistor technology for creating next-generation large-area, flexible and ultra-low-cost electronics.Conversely, the readily soluble, low-MW D-A polymers give low mobility.With the help of cooperative shifting motion of polystyrene chain segments, (I) readily self-assembled and crystallized out in the polystyrene matrix as an interpenetrating, nanowire semiconductor network, providing significantly enhanced mobility (over 8 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1)), on/off ratio (10(7)), and other desirable field-effect properties that meet impactful OFET application requirements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics and Institute of Advanced Materials, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) represent a low-cost transistor technology for creating next-generation large-area, flexible and ultra-low-cost electronics. Conjugated electron donor-acceptor (D-A) polymers have surfaced as ideal channel semiconductor candidates for OFETs. However, high-molecular weight (MW) D-A polymer semiconductors, which offer high field-effect mobility, generally suffer from processing complications due to limited solubility. Conversely, the readily soluble, low-MW D-A polymers give low mobility. We report herein a facile solution process which transformed a lower-MW, low-mobility diketopyrrolopyrrole-dithienylthieno[3,2-b]thiophene (I) into a high crystalline order and high-mobility semiconductor for OFETs applications. The process involved solution fabrication of a channel semiconductor film from a lower-MW (I) and polystyrene blends. With the help of cooperative shifting motion of polystyrene chain segments, (I) readily self-assembled and crystallized out in the polystyrene matrix as an interpenetrating, nanowire semiconductor network, providing significantly enhanced mobility (over 8 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1)), on/off ratio (10(7)), and other desirable field-effect properties that meet impactful OFET application requirements.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images and EDX analysis of (I) from a thermally annealed (I)/polystyrene (40/60 wt%) film after polystyrene removal and Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD) of (I) and its polystyrene blends.(a) TEM image of a nanowire fragment of (I) showing aggregate of nanodomain structures; insert displaying AFM topographic image of portion of corresponding nanowire network; (b) crystalline domains within nanodomain structure of (I); (c) visually distinctive π-π stacking structures of the crystalline domains of (I); (d) EDX analysis showing presence of sulfur element in the nanowire network of (I); and (e) GIXRD diffraction patterns of (I) as a function of polystyrene loading, showing appearance of (200) diffraction as polystyrene loading increased; insert: increase in (100)α phase intensity and concomitant decrease in (100)β phase intensity with increased polystyrene loading.
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f4: Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images and EDX analysis of (I) from a thermally annealed (I)/polystyrene (40/60 wt%) film after polystyrene removal and Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD) of (I) and its polystyrene blends.(a) TEM image of a nanowire fragment of (I) showing aggregate of nanodomain structures; insert displaying AFM topographic image of portion of corresponding nanowire network; (b) crystalline domains within nanodomain structure of (I); (c) visually distinctive π-π stacking structures of the crystalline domains of (I); (d) EDX analysis showing presence of sulfur element in the nanowire network of (I); and (e) GIXRD diffraction patterns of (I) as a function of polystyrene loading, showing appearance of (200) diffraction as polystyrene loading increased; insert: increase in (100)α phase intensity and concomitant decrease in (100)β phase intensity with increased polystyrene loading.

Mentions: Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis of nanowire network of (I) was carried out to gain an insight into the nanowire structure of (I). The thermally annealed (I)/polystyrene (40/60 wt%) film on OTS-18-modified silicon wafer substrate was first soaked in toluene for 2 minutes to remove the polystyrene. The remaining nanowire network film of (I) was carefully removed and placed on a lacey carbon coated Cu grid and subject to TEM examination. Figure 4a showed a low-magnification TEM image of a segment of a nanowire composed of an aggregate of irregular nanodomain structures of 30–80 nm in size, and a portion of the corresponding intertwined nanowire network of (I) could be seen in the AFM topographic image provided in Fig. 4a insert. Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy (Fig. 4d) of the film revealed presence of sulfur element in these nanodomain structures, confirming the identity of (I) for the nanowire network10. A high-definition TEM image of one of nanodomain structures showed highly crystalline domains within the structure (Fig. 4b) with visually discernable π-π stacking features having a π-π distance ranging from about 0.355–0.375 nm (Fig. 4c). No particular preferential orientations in the plane normal to the π-π stacking were adopted by these π-π stacking domains. Accordingly, this polycrystalline nanowire structure was quite different from the single-crystal nanowires where polymer chains were arranged along the length of the wire with preferential π-π stacking direction normal to the length of the nanowire20.


Solution-Processed Donor-Acceptor Polymer Nanowire Network Semiconductors For High-Performance Field-Effect Transistors.

Lei Y, Deng P, Li J, Lin M, Zhu F, Ng TW, Lee CS, Ong BS - Sci Rep (2016)

Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images and EDX analysis of (I) from a thermally annealed (I)/polystyrene (40/60 wt%) film after polystyrene removal and Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD) of (I) and its polystyrene blends.(a) TEM image of a nanowire fragment of (I) showing aggregate of nanodomain structures; insert displaying AFM topographic image of portion of corresponding nanowire network; (b) crystalline domains within nanodomain structure of (I); (c) visually distinctive π-π stacking structures of the crystalline domains of (I); (d) EDX analysis showing presence of sulfur element in the nanowire network of (I); and (e) GIXRD diffraction patterns of (I) as a function of polystyrene loading, showing appearance of (200) diffraction as polystyrene loading increased; insert: increase in (100)α phase intensity and concomitant decrease in (100)β phase intensity with increased polystyrene loading.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835732&req=5

f4: Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) images and EDX analysis of (I) from a thermally annealed (I)/polystyrene (40/60 wt%) film after polystyrene removal and Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD) of (I) and its polystyrene blends.(a) TEM image of a nanowire fragment of (I) showing aggregate of nanodomain structures; insert displaying AFM topographic image of portion of corresponding nanowire network; (b) crystalline domains within nanodomain structure of (I); (c) visually distinctive π-π stacking structures of the crystalline domains of (I); (d) EDX analysis showing presence of sulfur element in the nanowire network of (I); and (e) GIXRD diffraction patterns of (I) as a function of polystyrene loading, showing appearance of (200) diffraction as polystyrene loading increased; insert: increase in (100)α phase intensity and concomitant decrease in (100)β phase intensity with increased polystyrene loading.
Mentions: Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis of nanowire network of (I) was carried out to gain an insight into the nanowire structure of (I). The thermally annealed (I)/polystyrene (40/60 wt%) film on OTS-18-modified silicon wafer substrate was first soaked in toluene for 2 minutes to remove the polystyrene. The remaining nanowire network film of (I) was carefully removed and placed on a lacey carbon coated Cu grid and subject to TEM examination. Figure 4a showed a low-magnification TEM image of a segment of a nanowire composed of an aggregate of irregular nanodomain structures of 30–80 nm in size, and a portion of the corresponding intertwined nanowire network of (I) could be seen in the AFM topographic image provided in Fig. 4a insert. Energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy (Fig. 4d) of the film revealed presence of sulfur element in these nanodomain structures, confirming the identity of (I) for the nanowire network10. A high-definition TEM image of one of nanodomain structures showed highly crystalline domains within the structure (Fig. 4b) with visually discernable π-π stacking features having a π-π distance ranging from about 0.355–0.375 nm (Fig. 4c). No particular preferential orientations in the plane normal to the π-π stacking were adopted by these π-π stacking domains. Accordingly, this polycrystalline nanowire structure was quite different from the single-crystal nanowires where polymer chains were arranged along the length of the wire with preferential π-π stacking direction normal to the length of the nanowire20.

Bottom Line: Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) represent a low-cost transistor technology for creating next-generation large-area, flexible and ultra-low-cost electronics.Conversely, the readily soluble, low-MW D-A polymers give low mobility.With the help of cooperative shifting motion of polystyrene chain segments, (I) readily self-assembled and crystallized out in the polystyrene matrix as an interpenetrating, nanowire semiconductor network, providing significantly enhanced mobility (over 8 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1)), on/off ratio (10(7)), and other desirable field-effect properties that meet impactful OFET application requirements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics and Institute of Advanced Materials, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) represent a low-cost transistor technology for creating next-generation large-area, flexible and ultra-low-cost electronics. Conjugated electron donor-acceptor (D-A) polymers have surfaced as ideal channel semiconductor candidates for OFETs. However, high-molecular weight (MW) D-A polymer semiconductors, which offer high field-effect mobility, generally suffer from processing complications due to limited solubility. Conversely, the readily soluble, low-MW D-A polymers give low mobility. We report herein a facile solution process which transformed a lower-MW, low-mobility diketopyrrolopyrrole-dithienylthieno[3,2-b]thiophene (I) into a high crystalline order and high-mobility semiconductor for OFETs applications. The process involved solution fabrication of a channel semiconductor film from a lower-MW (I) and polystyrene blends. With the help of cooperative shifting motion of polystyrene chain segments, (I) readily self-assembled and crystallized out in the polystyrene matrix as an interpenetrating, nanowire semiconductor network, providing significantly enhanced mobility (over 8 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1)), on/off ratio (10(7)), and other desirable field-effect properties that meet impactful OFET application requirements.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus