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Solution-Processed Donor-Acceptor Polymer Nanowire Network Semiconductors For High-Performance Field-Effect Transistors.

Lei Y, Deng P, Li J, Lin M, Zhu F, Ng TW, Lee CS, Ong BS - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) represent a low-cost transistor technology for creating next-generation large-area, flexible and ultra-low-cost electronics.Conversely, the readily soluble, low-MW D-A polymers give low mobility.With the help of cooperative shifting motion of polystyrene chain segments, (I) readily self-assembled and crystallized out in the polystyrene matrix as an interpenetrating, nanowire semiconductor network, providing significantly enhanced mobility (over 8 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1)), on/off ratio (10(7)), and other desirable field-effect properties that meet impactful OFET application requirements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics and Institute of Advanced Materials, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) represent a low-cost transistor technology for creating next-generation large-area, flexible and ultra-low-cost electronics. Conjugated electron donor-acceptor (D-A) polymers have surfaced as ideal channel semiconductor candidates for OFETs. However, high-molecular weight (MW) D-A polymer semiconductors, which offer high field-effect mobility, generally suffer from processing complications due to limited solubility. Conversely, the readily soluble, low-MW D-A polymers give low mobility. We report herein a facile solution process which transformed a lower-MW, low-mobility diketopyrrolopyrrole-dithienylthieno[3,2-b]thiophene (I) into a high crystalline order and high-mobility semiconductor for OFETs applications. The process involved solution fabrication of a channel semiconductor film from a lower-MW (I) and polystyrene blends. With the help of cooperative shifting motion of polystyrene chain segments, (I) readily self-assembled and crystallized out in the polystyrene matrix as an interpenetrating, nanowire semiconductor network, providing significantly enhanced mobility (over 8 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1)), on/off ratio (10(7)), and other desirable field-effect properties that meet impactful OFET application requirements.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiles of neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene (40/60 wt%) films.(a,b) are depth profiles of elements (C, S, O and Si) in respectively neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene film; (c) relative concentrations of carbon as a function of film depth in neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene film; and (d) relative concentrations of sulfur as a function of film depth in neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene film.
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f3: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiles of neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene (40/60 wt%) films.(a,b) are depth profiles of elements (C, S, O and Si) in respectively neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene film; (c) relative concentrations of carbon as a function of film depth in neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene film; and (d) relative concentrations of sulfur as a function of film depth in neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene film.

Mentions: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling analysis revealed a relatively uniform distribution of (I) in the (I)/polystyrene blend film. Figure 3a,b showed the relative ratios of carbon, sulfur, oxygen and silicon elements as a function of the film depth for neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene (40/60 wt%) films. The carbon signals came from both (I) and polystyrene, while the sulfur signal was from (I). The oxygen and silicon signals were primarily from the silicon wafer substrate with a very minor contribution from (I). In both cases, the carbon signals were present across the film thicknesses and decreased gradually and disappeared towards the bottom of the films (Fig. 3c), indicating that both polystyrene and (I) were present throughout the bulk of the films. Likewise, the blown-up figure (Fig. 3d) displayed relatively uniform distribution of sulfur signal across the thickness of the film, affirming relatively uniform distribution of nanowire network of (I) in the (I)/polystyrene blend film. This was distinctively different from vertical phase separation where a dual-layer film structure resulted28293031. In particular, vertical phase separation of a polymer semiconductor from the polymer blend did not afford higher structural orders of the semiconductor31.


Solution-Processed Donor-Acceptor Polymer Nanowire Network Semiconductors For High-Performance Field-Effect Transistors.

Lei Y, Deng P, Li J, Lin M, Zhu F, Ng TW, Lee CS, Ong BS - Sci Rep (2016)

X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiles of neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene (40/60 wt%) films.(a,b) are depth profiles of elements (C, S, O and Si) in respectively neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene film; (c) relative concentrations of carbon as a function of film depth in neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene film; and (d) relative concentrations of sulfur as a function of film depth in neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene film.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835732&req=5

f3: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiles of neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene (40/60 wt%) films.(a,b) are depth profiles of elements (C, S, O and Si) in respectively neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene film; (c) relative concentrations of carbon as a function of film depth in neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene film; and (d) relative concentrations of sulfur as a function of film depth in neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene film.
Mentions: X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling analysis revealed a relatively uniform distribution of (I) in the (I)/polystyrene blend film. Figure 3a,b showed the relative ratios of carbon, sulfur, oxygen and silicon elements as a function of the film depth for neat (I) and (I)/polystyrene (40/60 wt%) films. The carbon signals came from both (I) and polystyrene, while the sulfur signal was from (I). The oxygen and silicon signals were primarily from the silicon wafer substrate with a very minor contribution from (I). In both cases, the carbon signals were present across the film thicknesses and decreased gradually and disappeared towards the bottom of the films (Fig. 3c), indicating that both polystyrene and (I) were present throughout the bulk of the films. Likewise, the blown-up figure (Fig. 3d) displayed relatively uniform distribution of sulfur signal across the thickness of the film, affirming relatively uniform distribution of nanowire network of (I) in the (I)/polystyrene blend film. This was distinctively different from vertical phase separation where a dual-layer film structure resulted28293031. In particular, vertical phase separation of a polymer semiconductor from the polymer blend did not afford higher structural orders of the semiconductor31.

Bottom Line: Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) represent a low-cost transistor technology for creating next-generation large-area, flexible and ultra-low-cost electronics.Conversely, the readily soluble, low-MW D-A polymers give low mobility.With the help of cooperative shifting motion of polystyrene chain segments, (I) readily self-assembled and crystallized out in the polystyrene matrix as an interpenetrating, nanowire semiconductor network, providing significantly enhanced mobility (over 8 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1)), on/off ratio (10(7)), and other desirable field-effect properties that meet impactful OFET application requirements.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Physics and Institute of Advanced Materials, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, P. R. China.

ABSTRACT
Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) represent a low-cost transistor technology for creating next-generation large-area, flexible and ultra-low-cost electronics. Conjugated electron donor-acceptor (D-A) polymers have surfaced as ideal channel semiconductor candidates for OFETs. However, high-molecular weight (MW) D-A polymer semiconductors, which offer high field-effect mobility, generally suffer from processing complications due to limited solubility. Conversely, the readily soluble, low-MW D-A polymers give low mobility. We report herein a facile solution process which transformed a lower-MW, low-mobility diketopyrrolopyrrole-dithienylthieno[3,2-b]thiophene (I) into a high crystalline order and high-mobility semiconductor for OFETs applications. The process involved solution fabrication of a channel semiconductor film from a lower-MW (I) and polystyrene blends. With the help of cooperative shifting motion of polystyrene chain segments, (I) readily self-assembled and crystallized out in the polystyrene matrix as an interpenetrating, nanowire semiconductor network, providing significantly enhanced mobility (over 8 cm(2)V(-1)s(-1)), on/off ratio (10(7)), and other desirable field-effect properties that meet impactful OFET application requirements.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus