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Altered Intrinsic Regional Activity and Interregional Functional Connectivity in Post-stroke Aphasia.

Yang M, Li J, Li Y, Li R, Pang Y, Yao D, Liao W, Chen H - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: In addition, intrinsic regional activity in the contralesional HIP/ParaHIP was negatively correlated with construction score.These findings suggested that the intrinsic regional brain dysfunctions in aphasia were related to interregional functional connectivity.Changes in the intrinsic regional brain activity and associated remote functional connectivity pattern would provide valuable information to enhance the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of aphasia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Information in BioMedicine, Key Laboratory for Neuroinformation of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China.

ABSTRACT
Several neuroimaging studies have examined cerebral function in patients who suffer from aphasia, but the mechanism underlying this disorder remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined alterations in the local regional and remote interregional network cerebral functions in aphasia combined with amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and interregional functional connectivity (FC) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 17 post-stroke aphasic patients, all having suffered a stroke in the left hemisphere, as well as 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, were enrolled in this study. The aphasic patients showed significantly increased intrinsic regional activity mainly in the contralesional mesial temporal (hippocampus/parahippocampus, [HIP/ParaHIP]) and lateral temporal cortices. In addition, intrinsic regional activity in the contralesional HIP/ParaHIP was negatively correlated with construction score. Aphasic patients showed increased remote interregional FC between the contralesional HIP/ParaHIP and fusiform gyrus, but reduced FC in the ipsilesional occipital and parietal cortices. These findings suggested that the intrinsic regional brain dysfunctions in aphasia were related to interregional functional connectivity. Changes in the intrinsic regional brain activity and associated remote functional connectivity pattern would provide valuable information to enhance the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of aphasia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Distribution of the lesion areas for all aphasic patients.The lesion area overlap across patients was rendered on the brain. Colors represent the number of patients with a lesion to a specific voxel. Numbers below each axial map and sagittal map refer to the z-plane and x-plane coordinates of the MNI space, respectively. Letters L and R correspond to the left and right sides of the brain, respectively.
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f1: Distribution of the lesion areas for all aphasic patients.The lesion area overlap across patients was rendered on the brain. Colors represent the number of patients with a lesion to a specific voxel. Numbers below each axial map and sagittal map refer to the z-plane and x-plane coordinates of the MNI space, respectively. Letters L and R correspond to the left and right sides of the brain, respectively.

Mentions: Post-stroke aphasic patients and healthy controls (HC) did not significantly differ in age (two sample t-test, P = 0.98), gender (χ2-test, P = 0.90), or years of education (Mann Whitney U-test, P = 0.58) (Table 1). Stroke-related clinical characteristics of the patients were tested using the Aphasia Battery of Chinese (ABC)1213. The ABC provides the following information: aphasia quotient (AQ), which includes spontaneous speech, auditory comprehension, repetition, and naming scores; performance quotient (PQ), which includes reading/writing, praxis, and construction (drawing, block design, numerical calculation, and Reven’s colored matrices scores) scores1415; and cortical quotient (CQ)16 (Table 1). All patients had an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke in the left hemisphere (Table 2). Lesion overlap images for all aphasic patients are shown in Fig. 1.


Altered Intrinsic Regional Activity and Interregional Functional Connectivity in Post-stroke Aphasia.

Yang M, Li J, Li Y, Li R, Pang Y, Yao D, Liao W, Chen H - Sci Rep (2016)

Distribution of the lesion areas for all aphasic patients.The lesion area overlap across patients was rendered on the brain. Colors represent the number of patients with a lesion to a specific voxel. Numbers below each axial map and sagittal map refer to the z-plane and x-plane coordinates of the MNI space, respectively. Letters L and R correspond to the left and right sides of the brain, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835729&req=5

f1: Distribution of the lesion areas for all aphasic patients.The lesion area overlap across patients was rendered on the brain. Colors represent the number of patients with a lesion to a specific voxel. Numbers below each axial map and sagittal map refer to the z-plane and x-plane coordinates of the MNI space, respectively. Letters L and R correspond to the left and right sides of the brain, respectively.
Mentions: Post-stroke aphasic patients and healthy controls (HC) did not significantly differ in age (two sample t-test, P = 0.98), gender (χ2-test, P = 0.90), or years of education (Mann Whitney U-test, P = 0.58) (Table 1). Stroke-related clinical characteristics of the patients were tested using the Aphasia Battery of Chinese (ABC)1213. The ABC provides the following information: aphasia quotient (AQ), which includes spontaneous speech, auditory comprehension, repetition, and naming scores; performance quotient (PQ), which includes reading/writing, praxis, and construction (drawing, block design, numerical calculation, and Reven’s colored matrices scores) scores1415; and cortical quotient (CQ)16 (Table 1). All patients had an ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke in the left hemisphere (Table 2). Lesion overlap images for all aphasic patients are shown in Fig. 1.

Bottom Line: In addition, intrinsic regional activity in the contralesional HIP/ParaHIP was negatively correlated with construction score.These findings suggested that the intrinsic regional brain dysfunctions in aphasia were related to interregional functional connectivity.Changes in the intrinsic regional brain activity and associated remote functional connectivity pattern would provide valuable information to enhance the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of aphasia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Information in BioMedicine, Key Laboratory for Neuroinformation of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054, China.

ABSTRACT
Several neuroimaging studies have examined cerebral function in patients who suffer from aphasia, but the mechanism underlying this disorder remains poorly understood. In this study, we examined alterations in the local regional and remote interregional network cerebral functions in aphasia combined with amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations and interregional functional connectivity (FC) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. A total of 17 post-stroke aphasic patients, all having suffered a stroke in the left hemisphere, as well as 20 age- and sex-matched healthy controls, were enrolled in this study. The aphasic patients showed significantly increased intrinsic regional activity mainly in the contralesional mesial temporal (hippocampus/parahippocampus, [HIP/ParaHIP]) and lateral temporal cortices. In addition, intrinsic regional activity in the contralesional HIP/ParaHIP was negatively correlated with construction score. Aphasic patients showed increased remote interregional FC between the contralesional HIP/ParaHIP and fusiform gyrus, but reduced FC in the ipsilesional occipital and parietal cortices. These findings suggested that the intrinsic regional brain dysfunctions in aphasia were related to interregional functional connectivity. Changes in the intrinsic regional brain activity and associated remote functional connectivity pattern would provide valuable information to enhance the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of aphasia.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus