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Affective and Motivational Factors Mediate the Relation between Math Skills and Use of Math in Everyday Life.

Jansen BR, Schmitz EA, van der Maas HL - Front Psychol (2016)

Bottom Line: This study focused on the use of math in everyday life (the propensity to recognize and solve quantitative issues in real life situations).Women's skills were estimated at a lower level than men's.For both women and men, higher skills were associated with higher perceived math competence, which in turn was associated with more use of math in everyday life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Developmental Psychology, University of AmsterdamAmsterdam, Netherlands; ABC Amsterdam Brain, and Cognition, University of AmsterdamAmsterdam, Netherlands; Yield, Research Institute of Child Development and Education, University of AmsterdamAmsterdam, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
This study focused on the use of math in everyday life (the propensity to recognize and solve quantitative issues in real life situations). Data from a Dutch nation-wide research on math among adults (N = 521) were used to investigate the question whether math anxiety and perceived math competence mediated the relationship between math skills and use of math in everyday life, taken gender differences into account. Results showed that women reported higher math anxiety, lower perceived math competence, and lower use of math in everyday life, compared to men. Women's skills were estimated at a lower level than men's. For both women and men, higher skills were associated with higher perceived math competence, which in turn was associated with more use of math in everyday life. Only for women, math anxiety also mediated the relation between math skills and use of math in everyday life.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Multigroup mediation model with relation between perceived math competence and use of math in everyday life restricted to be equal across genders. All other parameters were estimated freely. *p < 0.05; ***p < 0.001.
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Figure 1: Multigroup mediation model with relation between perceived math competence and use of math in everyday life restricted to be equal across genders. All other parameters were estimated freely. *p < 0.05; ***p < 0.001.

Mentions: Next, multigroup mediation analyses were performed. A model with all parameters restricted to be equal across genders deteriorated the model significantly, χ, p < 0.001, compared to a model where all parameters were estimated freely. The results of the hierarchical regression models suggested that the parameter that reflected the relation between perceived math competence and use of math in everyday life could be restricted to be equal across genders and this indeed did not deteriorate the model significantly, χ, p = 0.094. This multigroup mediation model is shown in Figure 1. For men only the indirect path through perceived math competence, and not math anxiety, had significant relations. The indirect effect of perceived math competence was indeed significant for men (bootstrapped confidence interval: 0.08–0.27; determined using scripts by Selig and Preacher, 2008), supporting the hypothesis that perceived math competence mediated the relationship between addition skills and use of math in everyday life for men. For women, indirect paths through both math anxiety and perceived math competence showed significant relations. Both indirect effects turned out to be significant for women (bootstrapped confidence interval for math anxiety: 0.14–0.45; bootstrapped confidence interval for perceived math competence: 0.08–0.26).


Affective and Motivational Factors Mediate the Relation between Math Skills and Use of Math in Everyday Life.

Jansen BR, Schmitz EA, van der Maas HL - Front Psychol (2016)

Multigroup mediation model with relation between perceived math competence and use of math in everyday life restricted to be equal across genders. All other parameters were estimated freely. *p < 0.05; ***p < 0.001.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835718&req=5

Figure 1: Multigroup mediation model with relation between perceived math competence and use of math in everyday life restricted to be equal across genders. All other parameters were estimated freely. *p < 0.05; ***p < 0.001.
Mentions: Next, multigroup mediation analyses were performed. A model with all parameters restricted to be equal across genders deteriorated the model significantly, χ, p < 0.001, compared to a model where all parameters were estimated freely. The results of the hierarchical regression models suggested that the parameter that reflected the relation between perceived math competence and use of math in everyday life could be restricted to be equal across genders and this indeed did not deteriorate the model significantly, χ, p = 0.094. This multigroup mediation model is shown in Figure 1. For men only the indirect path through perceived math competence, and not math anxiety, had significant relations. The indirect effect of perceived math competence was indeed significant for men (bootstrapped confidence interval: 0.08–0.27; determined using scripts by Selig and Preacher, 2008), supporting the hypothesis that perceived math competence mediated the relationship between addition skills and use of math in everyday life for men. For women, indirect paths through both math anxiety and perceived math competence showed significant relations. Both indirect effects turned out to be significant for women (bootstrapped confidence interval for math anxiety: 0.14–0.45; bootstrapped confidence interval for perceived math competence: 0.08–0.26).

Bottom Line: This study focused on the use of math in everyday life (the propensity to recognize and solve quantitative issues in real life situations).Women's skills were estimated at a lower level than men's.For both women and men, higher skills were associated with higher perceived math competence, which in turn was associated with more use of math in everyday life.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Developmental Psychology, University of AmsterdamAmsterdam, Netherlands; ABC Amsterdam Brain, and Cognition, University of AmsterdamAmsterdam, Netherlands; Yield, Research Institute of Child Development and Education, University of AmsterdamAmsterdam, Netherlands.

ABSTRACT
This study focused on the use of math in everyday life (the propensity to recognize and solve quantitative issues in real life situations). Data from a Dutch nation-wide research on math among adults (N = 521) were used to investigate the question whether math anxiety and perceived math competence mediated the relationship between math skills and use of math in everyday life, taken gender differences into account. Results showed that women reported higher math anxiety, lower perceived math competence, and lower use of math in everyday life, compared to men. Women's skills were estimated at a lower level than men's. For both women and men, higher skills were associated with higher perceived math competence, which in turn was associated with more use of math in everyday life. Only for women, math anxiety also mediated the relation between math skills and use of math in everyday life.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus