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Three-dimensional multiway power dividers based on transformation optics.

Wu YL, Zhuang Z, Deng L, Liu YA - Sci Rep (2016)

Bottom Line: It comprises of several nonisotropic mediums and one isotropic medium without any lumped and distributed elements.In addition, the location of the split point can be employed to obtain unequal power dividers.The excellent simulated results verify the novel design method for power dividers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing Key Laboratory of Work Safety Intelligent Monitoring, School of Electronic Engineering, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box. 282, 100876, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
The two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) multiway power dividers based on transformation optical theory are proposed in this paper. It comprises of several nonisotropic mediums and one isotropic medium without any lumped and distributed elements. By using finite embedded coordinate transformations, the incident beam can be split and bent arbitrarily in order to achieve effective power division and transmission. In addition, the location of the split point can be employed to obtain unequal power dividers. Finally, several typical examples of the generalized power divider without limitation in 3D space are performed, which shows that the proposed power divider can implement required functions with arbitrary power division and arbitrary transmission paths. The excellent simulated results verify the novel design method for power dividers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Results of the proposed 2D-TWUPD.(a) Power flow distributions of the 2D-TWUPD with a = ±1 m, d = 0.03 m. (b) Power flow distributions of the 2D-TWUPD with a = ±1 m, d = 0.05 m. (c) Power flow distributions of the 2D-TWUPD with a = ±1 m, d = 0.07 m. The operating frequency of all simulations is 2.3 GHz. By changing the value of offset distance, unequal power division can be implemented in two output transmission paths. (d) S-parameters of two-way power dividers with different power division ratios. It can be seen that power division changes with offset distance variation. The power division ratio at 2.3 GHz is 0.65 with d = 0.03 m and the power division ratios at 2.3 GHz are 0.49 and 0.37 when d = 0.05 m and d = 0.07 m, respectively.
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f3: Results of the proposed 2D-TWUPD.(a) Power flow distributions of the 2D-TWUPD with a = ±1 m, d = 0.03 m. (b) Power flow distributions of the 2D-TWUPD with a = ±1 m, d = 0.05 m. (c) Power flow distributions of the 2D-TWUPD with a = ±1 m, d = 0.07 m. The operating frequency of all simulations is 2.3 GHz. By changing the value of offset distance, unequal power division can be implemented in two output transmission paths. (d) S-parameters of two-way power dividers with different power division ratios. It can be seen that power division changes with offset distance variation. The power division ratio at 2.3 GHz is 0.65 with d = 0.03 m and the power division ratios at 2.3 GHz are 0.49 and 0.37 when d = 0.05 m and d = 0.07 m, respectively.

Mentions: where d represents the offset distance of the split point and ‘±’ denotes left and right offset direction. The power flows of two-way unequal power dividers (TWUPDs) with different power division ratios are depicted in Fig. 3 and the corresponding S-parameters transformed from power division ratios are shown in Fig. 3d. From aforementioned simulated results, when the incident beam excited in the input port accesses to the two transformation optical mediums with different material parameters, it is split into two beams of different directions with lower power. Therefore, using transformation optics can implement the required function with power division and then the power in output ports can be controlled independently by the location of the split point. It is worth noting that the directions of the two split beams can be determined by the parameter a according to the demands in practical applications.


Three-dimensional multiway power dividers based on transformation optics.

Wu YL, Zhuang Z, Deng L, Liu YA - Sci Rep (2016)

Results of the proposed 2D-TWUPD.(a) Power flow distributions of the 2D-TWUPD with a = ±1 m, d = 0.03 m. (b) Power flow distributions of the 2D-TWUPD with a = ±1 m, d = 0.05 m. (c) Power flow distributions of the 2D-TWUPD with a = ±1 m, d = 0.07 m. The operating frequency of all simulations is 2.3 GHz. By changing the value of offset distance, unequal power division can be implemented in two output transmission paths. (d) S-parameters of two-way power dividers with different power division ratios. It can be seen that power division changes with offset distance variation. The power division ratio at 2.3 GHz is 0.65 with d = 0.03 m and the power division ratios at 2.3 GHz are 0.49 and 0.37 when d = 0.05 m and d = 0.07 m, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4835709&req=5

f3: Results of the proposed 2D-TWUPD.(a) Power flow distributions of the 2D-TWUPD with a = ±1 m, d = 0.03 m. (b) Power flow distributions of the 2D-TWUPD with a = ±1 m, d = 0.05 m. (c) Power flow distributions of the 2D-TWUPD with a = ±1 m, d = 0.07 m. The operating frequency of all simulations is 2.3 GHz. By changing the value of offset distance, unequal power division can be implemented in two output transmission paths. (d) S-parameters of two-way power dividers with different power division ratios. It can be seen that power division changes with offset distance variation. The power division ratio at 2.3 GHz is 0.65 with d = 0.03 m and the power division ratios at 2.3 GHz are 0.49 and 0.37 when d = 0.05 m and d = 0.07 m, respectively.
Mentions: where d represents the offset distance of the split point and ‘±’ denotes left and right offset direction. The power flows of two-way unequal power dividers (TWUPDs) with different power division ratios are depicted in Fig. 3 and the corresponding S-parameters transformed from power division ratios are shown in Fig. 3d. From aforementioned simulated results, when the incident beam excited in the input port accesses to the two transformation optical mediums with different material parameters, it is split into two beams of different directions with lower power. Therefore, using transformation optics can implement the required function with power division and then the power in output ports can be controlled independently by the location of the split point. It is worth noting that the directions of the two split beams can be determined by the parameter a according to the demands in practical applications.

Bottom Line: It comprises of several nonisotropic mediums and one isotropic medium without any lumped and distributed elements.In addition, the location of the split point can be employed to obtain unequal power dividers.The excellent simulated results verify the novel design method for power dividers.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Beijing Key Laboratory of Work Safety Intelligent Monitoring, School of Electronic Engineering, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box. 282, 100876, Beijing, China.

ABSTRACT
The two-dimensional (2D) or three-dimensional (3D) multiway power dividers based on transformation optical theory are proposed in this paper. It comprises of several nonisotropic mediums and one isotropic medium without any lumped and distributed elements. By using finite embedded coordinate transformations, the incident beam can be split and bent arbitrarily in order to achieve effective power division and transmission. In addition, the location of the split point can be employed to obtain unequal power dividers. Finally, several typical examples of the generalized power divider without limitation in 3D space are performed, which shows that the proposed power divider can implement required functions with arbitrary power division and arbitrary transmission paths. The excellent simulated results verify the novel design method for power dividers.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus